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Author Topic:   Johnson Space Center Rocket Park: Saturn V
Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-11-2007 06:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Sets Grand Opening July 20 for Restored Saturn V Rocket

NASA's Johnson Space Center will host the grand opening of a restored Houston landmark and national treasure, the immense Saturn V rocket resting at the space center gate, on July 20, 38 years to the day after men first walked on the moon.

The 30-story tall rocket is part of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum collection and one of only three such rockets in existence. Media are invited to attend a ribbon cutting for the facility at 11:30 a.m.

Speakers at the event will include astronauts and moonwalkers John Young and Alan Bean as well as astronauts Walt Cunningham, who flew on the Apollo 7 flight in earth orbit, and Joe Kerwin, who flew in an Apollo spacecraft to the Skylab space station. Apollo-era flight director Chris Kraft, National Air and Space Museum curator Allen Needell, and JSC Center Director Mike Coats also will participate.

The Saturn V facility will open to the public July 21. On that day, NASA representatives will be on hand from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about the Saturn V as well as NASA's Constellation Program to return humans to the moon. Beginning July 22, the facility will be open daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The Saturn V is one of the largest and most significant artifacts in the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum collection. It has been on loan to Johnson since 1977. The Saturn V remains the most powerful rocket ever built, and it was launched 13 times from 1967 to 1973. Eight of the missions it launched traveled to the moon, and six landed there. The final Saturn V launch in 1973 put Skylab, America's first space station, in orbit.

The Saturn V at Johnson had been exposed to the elements for more than 20 years while on display. The exposure had caused extensive corrosion and degradation. In 1999, the National Air and Space Museum applied for a grant to preserve the rocket through the Save America's Treasures Program, the centerpiece of the White House National Millennium Commemoration. For the preservation, the museum received funds from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Houston Endowment, Halliburton and other sources. Matching funds were provided by the National Park Service.

The goal was to return the rocket to a condition matching as closely as possible the way it would have appeared on the launch pad. The project team erected a climate-controlled building to house the rocket, designed and executed a testing program to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning and repair treatments, developed a data management system for recording and retrieving information gathered, and stabilized and conserved the Saturn V to arrest its deterioration and make it suitable for display. The restoration ensures the Saturn V will remain on exhibit to inform and inspire many generations of visitors to come. The preservation work was performed by Conservation Solutions, Inc. of Washington, D.C.

For more information about the Saturn V and its restoration, see: Full Coverage: JSC Saturn V Restoration.

capoetc
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From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 07-11-2007 11:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm sure I must have missed something ... was it just the temporary facility that opened to the public last summer? Is there a new building in place to exhibit the Houston Saturn V?

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 07-11-2007 11:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's the same building but in the interim since it opened to public tours last summer, NASA's exhibits department at Johnson Space Center has been working to install signs, mission banners, and flat screen displays, among other improvements. The July 20 grand opening marks the completion of this work and formally recognizes the restoration of the Saturn V.

MCroft04
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From: Smithfield, Me, USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 07-11-2007 08:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The restoration is fantastic! I often take visitors and they are amazed at the size of the Saturn V.

I've seen it three or four times since the restoration and am always stunned by the size and technology. Wish I could be there July 20.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-18-2007 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Florida Today:
Another of the mammoth Saturn 5 rockets from the U.S. moon-shot program has been rescued from a rusty demise and restored to museum standards for tourists visiting Johnson Space Center.

Three of the gargantuan launchers, which were used to blast crew and cargo from Kennedy Space Center to the moon, remained when the lunar-landing program was cut short in the 1970s. The one at NASA's center in Houston, Texas, had been sitting on display outdoors, its condition degrading as it sat exposed to both visitors and the elements of the weather.

This week, as part of the celebration of Friday's 38th anniversary of the first manned moon landing in 1969, NASA will unveil the restored version of one of the relics and open the now-indoor exhibit to tourists.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 07-20-2007 04:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
'Houston, we have a restored moon rocket'

With managers, moonwalkers and the media watching, NASA's Johnson Space Center opened Friday a facility designed to protect and display the last remaining 363-foot Saturn V rocket to be assembled from parts once capable of launching astronauts to the Moon.

"I think there is no more appropriate time to celebrate this historic spacecraft than on July 20, which is the 38th anniversary of the first footprints on the Moon," said Mike Coats, the director of Johnson Space Center and a former shuttle astronaut, in his welcoming remarks.

E2M Lem Man
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From: Los Angeles CA. USA
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posted 07-24-2007 03:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wonderful news, but that isn't the same command module that was there before. Which CM is it?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-24-2007 03:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It is the same command module, but with its damaging white paint removed:
"The command module will not be painted when its put back on its display stand. I think this will be the biggest shock to everybody that the command module will not be white. The white paint did not hold up well, the phenolic resin also expands and contracts, holding moisture in. There is a possibility that the Smithsonian will get a boost protective skirt made for it and then it will appear white," explained [Conservation Solutions' Project Manager Jee] Skavdahl.
It is Command Module No. 115.

E2M Lem Man
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posted 07-24-2007 07:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The retirees here in Downey are guessing that she was pulled off the line here before she got her coatings — which maybe why they painted her white. S/C 115 never flew but was a real Apollo, never finished, but could have gone to the moon if Apollo continued.

MrSpace86
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From: Gardner, KS, USA
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 06-10-2013 01:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was at the Saturn V Center at JSC two years and it was awesome. Not quite as interactive as KSC but sometimes simple is better.

I do recall that the building was due to last about ten years and I think we are coming up on that or have surpassed that. Are there any plans on building a better building for it (similar to the KSC display) or if upgrades will be performed to the existing building.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 06-10-2013 01:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At this time, I do not believe there are plans for either an upgrade or replacement. Sequester cutbacks have limited the extent to which Johnson Space Center's Exhibits Program can undertake new projects.

p51
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From: Olympia, WA, USA
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posted 06-10-2013 03:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Such a shame, as the Kennedy Space Center and U.S. Space & Rocket Center Saturns are each in climate-controlled buildings with concrete floors. Had I not seen the JSC Saturn back when it was still outside, I would have been seriously disappointed.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-10-2013 03:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Johnson Space Center Saturn V building is climate controlled and does have a concrete floor. The Saturn V itself sits on its original grassy knoll (though the grass is now astroturf) because it cannot be physically moved.

Even after the restoration, the stages are so fragile, that any attempt to move the booster was deemed threatening to its structure.

MrSpace86
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From: Gardner, KS, USA
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posted 06-13-2013 07:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Air & Space Magazine had an article about the Saturn V Kennedy Space Center restoration and it was insanely awesome. They did show photos of the stages being moved around... so does that mean that structurally the JSC Saturn V was (or I guess still is) in a far worse condition that the KSC rocket?

And I guess that answered my next question as to whether or not a new building could be built with the stages being moved.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-13-2013 08:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, the Saturn V in Houston was in poorer condition when its conversation began. From one of our updates at the time:
"I realized [that the Saturn V] is the most magnificent example of disposable technology," said Jee Skavdahl, Project Manager for Conservation Solutions, Inc., the company retained by the Smithsonian to conduct the restoration.

"Disposable technology does not hold up well outside in a Houston climate and atmosphere with everything you have going on out there, between humidity, pollution and ozone. I tried to find the date that the styrofoam cup was made to see where it compares with the development of the Saturn V rocket and I couldn't find it, but I actually think the styrofoam cup, in some ways, would hold up better then what's happened to the rocket over the years."

sev8n
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From: Dallas TX USA
Registered: Jul 2012

posted 06-14-2013 06:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for sev8n     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From The History of Styrofoam Cups:
Foam cups trace their roots to the Koppers Company, which in 1970 filed a patent for a plastic foam cup with walls that do not exceed twice the diameter of the foamed beads used to compose it. This foam had excellent insulation properties, and it was adopted as the material of choice for dispensing hot drinks.

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