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Author Topic:   KSC Visitor Complex: Shuttle Launch Experience
Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-26-2007 03:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex release
NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex Set to Unveil 'Shuttle Launch Experience,' Capturing Mankind's Greatest Adventure

Countdown Begins: Unprecedented $60 Million Orlando Experience Blasts Off May 25, 2007

NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex has announced the opening of Shuttle Launch Experience, slated for May 25, 2007. This authentic $60 million launch simulation will take visitors on their own journey with the sights, sounds and sensations of the space shuttle's voyage to Earth's orbit. Designed in consultation with NASA and space shuttle astronauts, this unprecedented experience inspires visitors' spirit of adventure and exploration of our final frontier.

Shuttle Launch Experience will take visitors from around the world through the sensations of blasting into Earth's orbit from the birthplace of U.S. space exploration — Kennedy Space Center. A team of astronauts, NASA experts and renowned attraction designers conceived this authentic ride experience, deploying sophisticated motion-based platforms, special effects seats and high fidelity visual and audio presentations.

"Shuttle Launch Experience will forge a lasting impression for everyone, especially those who have ever imagined the adventure of space travel," said Daniel LeBlanc, Chief Operating Officer of Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Not only will guests experience the thrill of launching into space, they will marvel at the view of Earth from space, through state-of-the art technology.

Three years in the making, Shuttle Launch Experience combines the perspective of detailed astronaut experiences with the expertise of premiere ride engineers to produce a ride that rivals leading theme parks around the world. Nearing completion, the attraction's technical highlights include authentic simulation of the space shuttle's launch into orbit, custom-designed motion platforms with unprecedented vertical range, high-definition audiovisual effects, and advanced seating effects to maximize the reality of the experience.

The journey begins as visitors enter the Shuttle Launch Simulation Facility, architecturally inspired by space shuttle facilities at Kennedy Space Center. As visitors rise along the gantry, astronaut testimonials set the stage for what is to come. Visitors enter the heart of shuttle operations for the pre-launch briefing, guided by veteran Shuttle Commander Charlie Bolden. He leads the process, going step-by-step through the launch sequence soon to be witnessed first hand. Passengers enter the crew pod in the shuttle's cargo bay and strap in for launch. For the next five minutes, the pod's 44 passengers feel, see and live the trip to 17,500 mph. What follows, as the shuttle bay doors open, is a breathtaking view of Earth seldom seen in the first person.

For collectSPACE's earlier coverage of the SLE announcement, see: 'Shuttle Experience' to launch tourists

Moonpaws
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posted 02-26-2007 04:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moonpaws   Click Here to Email Moonpaws     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For the riding enjoyment of your fellow occupants, eat a big breakfast.

KSCartist
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posted 02-27-2007 06:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steak and eggs, right? And don't forget the five cups of coffee.

lunarrv15
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posted 03-01-2007 11:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunarrv15   Click Here to Email lunarrv15     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is this as the same ride at Disney or similar to Astronaut Hall of Fame shuttle ride?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-01-2007 11:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Neither, the ride system is unlike any of the existing space-themed simulators, based on an early walk through and an interview with the president of the company building the Shuttle Launch Experience. We are planning a preview and review of the SLE as its opening approaches.

Rizz
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posted 03-01-2007 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rizz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How about on a scale of 1 through 10?

At the Astronaut Hall of Fame, where you sit in a mock up shuttle and watch a big screen, as a "1" and Disney, where you can hurl your guts, as a "10."

MarylandSpace
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posted 03-01-2007 04:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
After doing the Disney centrifuge with fellow cS'er Bryan McKay, I don't know... but I will. Don't we all dream of space?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2007 09:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
KSC Visitor Complex release
Guests 'Go Vertical' on Memorial Day Weekend...
Shuttle Launch Experience: Unprecedented Attraction Premiers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex

NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex unveils the first interactive visitor experience of its kind — Shuttle Launch Experience — lifting off this Memorial Day weekend. This premier attraction officially opens Friday, May 25; the culmination of three years of development by veteran Space Shuttle astronauts, under the guidance of NASA. Shuttle Launch Experience will send visitors through the sensations of launching into Earth's orbit from Kennedy Space Center, the birthplace of American space exploration, just east of Orlando.

The design team, veteran NASA astronauts and renowned attraction experts created this authentic experience, deploying sophisticated motion technology, special effects seats and high fidelity visual and audio presentations. This unique-in-the-world experience immerses visitors in the sights, sounds and sensations of launching into space fully vertical.

The launch begins at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, May 25, 2007 with a colorful and patriotic parade of American and Space Shuttle mission flags carried proudly by young people from Florida and across the country. Distinguished speakers include Florida Lt. Governor Jeff Kottkamp, Kennedy Space Center Director Bill Parsons and Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex Chief Operating Officer Daniel LeBlanc. First Space Shuttle Commander John Young and Pilot Robert Crippen will cut the ribbon and lead the way for 44 astronauts to take the inaugural launch of Shuttle Launch Experience. Visitors then embark on Shuttle Launch Experience at noon, becoming the first guests to experience the thrill of a Space Shuttle's rush to Earth's orbit.

On Saturday, May 26, the launch culminates with Mannheim Steamroller live in concert onsite at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex at 9:00 p.m. The Grammy Award-winning band, founded by Chip Davis in the early 70s, has sold more than 18 million albums worldwide.

"We're thrilled to celebrate the culmination of this phenomenal $60 million project by unveiling Shuttle Launch Experience to the public, and inviting them to feel what the astronauts have felt, and see what they've seen — first-hand," remarked Daniel LeBlanc, Chief Operating Officer of Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. "Not only will they experience the thrill of launching into space, they will marvel at the spectacular view of Earth from space, through state-of-the-art digital technology."

Shuttle Launch Experience combines the detailed accounts of astronaut experiences with the expertise of premier design engineers to produce a true-to-life experience unique to visitor attractions around the world. The technical highlights include an amazingly realistic simulation of the space shuttle's eight and a half-minute ascent into orbit, custom-designed crew cabins with unprecedented vertical range, high-definition audiovisual effects, and advanced seating effects to maximize the sense of realism.

Along with the NASA and Delaware North Parks & Resorts team, operators of Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, attraction experts have designed and engineered Shuttle Launch Experience into the most realistic launch simulation ever created. Shuttle Launch Experience is designed by BRC Imagination Arts, who also designed the Apollo/Saturn V Center which opened in 1997 at the Visitor Complex. BRPH Companies Inc. serves as the architect and construction manager. The crew cabin simulator fabrication is by Oceaneering and the crew cabin concept designer and engineer is The Wheel Thing, Inc. Technomedia Solutions is providing audio, visual and show control. HW Davis Construction is the general contractor of the facility.

Shuttle Launch Experience is financed in part through a Bank of America loan arranged and managed by Space Florida, the principal organization charged with fostering the growth of Florida's Space industry by the State of Florida.

For more, see our exclusive preview: Shuttle launch ride enters final countdown[/b]

Blackarrow
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posted 05-22-2007 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As a matter of interest, are there any health restrictions?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-22-2007 05:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a shot of the caution and warning sign:

KSCartist
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posted 05-24-2007 07:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
OUTSTANDING!

My family and I attended the preview for annual pass holders last night. There was a good size crowd but everyone moved easily through the turnstiles and security.

Due to the size of the crowd, attendees were given either a pink or green bracelet. The pink ones let you ride between 7pm and 8pm and the pink ones between 8pm and 9pm. Between 9 and 10pm anyone could ride.

Dinner was offered free of charge and was catered by Sonny's Bar-B-Que Restaurant. We elected to eat before we rode.

When we approached the "simulator" (do not call it a "ride"- "rides" are what they have in Orlando) we were instructed to place our items into a locker. They don't want F.O.D. to injure anyone. For those unaware of this acronym it stands for Foreign Object Debris. Things like hats, sunglasses, purses, etc. We then started up the gangway of the "gantry" that wound back and forth until we got inside. There are TV monitors with comments from shuttle astronauts speaking about their experiences.

Note: There are 4 crew modules that hold 44 people each. Although only two were being used last night. One is being finished and another was due to be put into service NLT June 4th. So lines will move pretty quickly.

When you enter the building you are in a briefing area. Charlie Bolden is the "simulator" host. Broadcast on two large video monitors which are attached to two "RMS" arms Charlie explains what the flight crew goes through before launch, how the ET and SRB's work and what the countdown is like. The lighting and fog venting off of the vehicle create excellent effects. At the end of the briefing you enter the area where the simulators are located. Two to the left and two to the right. There are 7 doors along each. Door number 1 is for the front row of the simulator. My son-in-law and I were in row 2. There is a VIP Viewing Room where folks who cannot experience the simulator or those who opt out at the last minute go into to watch. My wife and daughter went in there.

Just as we are about to enter the module, we are told that it is out of service. We found out later there was an issue with the payload bay doors. The "crew" to our left entered their module and we were put into their line as next to go.

When it is your turn you enter the module and take your seat. (A low and very shallow seat for those of us with generous backsides.) You are instructed to strap in with your seat belt and each row is checked to ensure they are all latched. Then the fun begins.

Charlie is back on the screen and explains how this is a special crew module for the payload bay. He says your orbiter is already on the pad, fueled up and ready to go and now you have to get vertical too. An illustration of the module tilting up to 90 degrees is shown as you are tilted back. Now the shallow seat doesn't matter much as you are on your back. There are grab bars available to use and as the main engines light and you feel the "twang" you find yourself using them.

At liftoff you honestly feel what we've all seen on the onboard cameras of the flight deck crew shaking and being jolted in their seats. The engineering of this simulator is incredible. A hint: raise your head off the seat head rest so you don't get too blurry a vision.

The seats are specially engineered so that when you throttle back to pass through Max-Q and then throttle up - you feel it. When MECO happens you pitch forward (you're actually lowering back don slowly) and you feel that flushed -light-headed feeling like you've just become weightless. The view of Earth when the payload bay doors open is as breathtaking as "The Dream Is Alive" IMAX film.

When you descend to exit you are walking down a spiraling ramp with a star field above and a view of Earth as if you were looking through the big window in the Destiny Lab. Along the handrails are placques marking each of the crews and missions of the shuttle program. Then of course you exit through the gift shop.

Now some notes of constructive criticism.

If they want people to shop remind them to take out their credit cards or money from their purses when they have to place them in the lockers prior to entering.

I know DNPS just conducted a job fair to be ready for the summer season. But train your people. The cashier couldn't answer my question about the availability of a Shuttle Launch Experience patch. He looked at me like he didn't know what I was talking about. This kind of lack of knowledge has happened in the main gift shop as well. The employees have a responsibility to know what they have even if they can't take the time to learn about the difference between Shuttle and ISS crew patches. They are there to assist the public.

And I know they are going to be busy for the foreseeable future- they are going to work a lot of hours - so do not bring your bad mood to work. You are there to make your guests feel welcome.

All in all a fantastic experience and I look forward to going back again and again.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-25-2007 08:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Last night's media preview was, pardon the pun, a blast! I plan to compose my experience on the Experience (including comments from astronauts Rick Searfoss and Charlie Bolden, both of whom had a role in the simulator's creation) for a review/article on the main site, but here are some photographs until then...

(This same stage will be used to host the Manheim Steamroller concert on Saturday.)

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-25-2007 08:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Arriving on orbit, the payload bay doors open to a stunning reveal.

Ben
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posted 05-25-2007 09:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The ride will do a great job of teaching the public more about the job of getting the shuttle into orbit. The only thing I disliked: I wished the ride lasted longer!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-25-2007 04:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pictures from today's grand opening ceremony:

Astronauts attending: John Young, Bob Crippen, Jack Lousma, Hank Hartsfield, Story Musgrave, John Fabian, Norm Thagard, Guy Bluford, Hoot Gibson, Bruce McCandless, Mike Mullane, Jon McBride, Loren Shriver, Don Williams, Jeff Hoffman, John Creighton, John-David Bartoe, Charlie Bolden, Bob Cenker, Bob Springer, Mark Lee, John Blaha, Pierre Thuot, Sam Gemar, Roy Bridges, Bruce Melnick, Andy Allen, Rich Clifford, Rick Searfoss, Bill Gregory, Sam Durrance, Kevin Kregel, Fred Leslie, Roger Crouch, Winston Scott, Greg Linteris, Buzz Aldrin and Al Worden.

Before cutting (or more accurately, pulling apart) the ribbon that opened the Experience, Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex Chief Operating Officer Dan LeBlanc led a ceremony that included remarks by Kennedy Space Center Director Bill Parsons, Lt. Governor of Florida Jeff Kottkamp and the crew of STS-1, Young and Crippen.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-25-2007 05:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
After the ribbon cutting, the astronauts proceeded inside to experience the Experience:

From inside the Observation Station, the view inside the simulator as the astronauts watch the payload bay doors open.

MarylandSpace
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posted 05-25-2007 11:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great photography Rob. I felt as if I were there. Thanks for sharing.

tegwilym
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posted 05-26-2007 02:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So did that group say it was realistic feeling?

Rob Joyner
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posted 05-26-2007 10:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great photos! I can't wait until June 8th! T-minus 13 days and counting! Were there any astronauts conducting autograph signings after the 'landing'?

BobbyA
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posted 05-26-2007 10:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BobbyA   Click Here to Email BobbyA     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Didn't they invite any female astronauts? It looks like the old boys club.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-26-2007 09:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BobbyA:
Didn't they invite any female astronauts?
Invitations were extended to many more astronauts — including female astronauts — but only those listed above were available to attend.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-26-2007 09:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tegwilym:
So did that group say it was realistic feeling?
Yes, with a few exceptions. I still need to transcribe my interviews with Rick Searfoss, Charlie Bolden and Bob Crippen, who all answered this question in detail...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-27-2007 06:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Joyner:
Were there any astronauts conducting autograph signings after the 'landing'?
I didn't see any organized, sit-down signings however from across the way from where a press conference was being organized, I did watch as a good number of the astronauts (with the usual exceptions) paused to sign autographs for those waiting outside the attraction.

Blackarrow
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posted 05-28-2007 09:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Would a truly accurate simulation of a shuttle launch not have to involve high G-forces (at least 3G) and wouldn't that have to involve a centrifuge?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-28-2007 10:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
Would a truly accurate simulation of a shuttle launch not have to involve high G-forces (at least 3G) and wouldn't that have to involve a centrifuge?
The technology employed by the Shuttle Launch Experience, although not a centrifuge, does create the sensation of increased g-forces, complete with the feeling that the skin on your face is being pulled back and that you are being pressed into your seat. And that's to say nothing of the experience following MECO...

lewarren
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posted 05-28-2007 03:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lewarren   Click Here to Email lewarren     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
Would a truly accurate simulation of a shuttle launch not have to involve high G-forces (at least 3G) and wouldn't that have to involve a centrifuge?

Not necessarily a centrifuge. Linear acceleration could be used, provided a dedicated railway or a very tall building with a very high speed elevator!

Blackarrow
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posted 05-28-2007 08:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
The technology employed by the Shuttle Launch Experience, although not a centrifuge, does create the sensation of increased g-forces, complete with the feeling that the skin on your face is being pulled back and that you are being pressed into your seat. And that's to say nothing of the experience following MECO...
"Creating the sensation" suggests a fooling of the senses. How is this achieved? Either there is a genuine increase in G-force (which can ONLY be caused by acceleration, either linear [hardly practicable in a simulator] or circular [i.e. a centrifuge]) or there is a PERCEPTION of increased G-force, which is not real. How do you make people think they are being subjected to increased G-forces if they aren't? And even if you can fool the brain, how do you fool the skin? Sorry for sounding a bit negative - I just want to know how they do it!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-28-2007 08:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
And even if you can fool the brain, how do you fool the skin? Sorry for sounding a bit negative - I just want to know how they do it!
Well, for those who do not want to know, a fair warning...

SPOILER ALERT

The Shuttle Launch Experience uses the combination of a motion simulator platform that can pitch forward and back with seats that can kick, rumble and that feature air bladders that inflate and deflate. Acoustic energy is also employed to deliver the full launch experience.

To recreate the sensation of increased g's, SLE riders are pitched on their backs (at increasing angles but never at a true 90 degrees, part of the mind fooling the body) while the chairs rapidly kick forward and back, creating the sense of acceleration (and the reaction of one's skin being taught back). The air bladders gradually deflate, giving riders the feeling that they are being pressed back into their seat, while acoustic and lighting effects trick the mind into perceiving forward motion.

To create the feeling of weightlessness, the platform pitches further back just before MECO and then rapidly pitches forward to a negative angle as the bladders in the seat inflate. The end effect is the rider sliding forward in their seat, while the blood that has pooled in their head (while on their backs) now is pulled back down by gravity, giving a similar lightheaded sensation that astronauts describe upon reaching orbit. The effect is further enhanced by the platform rocking back and forth, extending the sense that the rider is floating.

END SPOILER ALERT

Some of the same techniques are employed by NASA's own simulators for training shuttle astronauts.

I should stress though that even having known in advance how the ride worked I was greatly surprised at how effective the experience was upon riding it. Having ridden centrifuges and having flown aboard a parabolic flight, I was really impressed by the SLE. In comparison with Disney's Mission: Space, which was built upon a real centrifuge, I found the Shuttle Launch Experience to be a more effective simulator.

tegwilym
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posted 05-29-2007 03:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How does this compare with Epcot's Mission Space ride?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-29-2007 05:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As mentioned above, I found SLE to be a more effective simulation than M:S, though the latter does deliver real g-forces. A lot of this has to do with the theming and story telling, which if you go back and read my review of M:S when it opened, I described as weak at times. To the contrary, SLE is not only clear from the start but keeps you engaged in the experience from the moment you approach the building.

In regards to the ride-component of each, SLE is a more violent experience, in the sense that it rattles and rumbles with much more force than does M:S. On the other hand, M:S has the tendency to effect the inner ear and balance system more so than SLE, due to the fact that it actually spins. SLE seems longer in duration though both have roughly the same ride time.

I would recommend both SLE and M:S to hopeful, healthy-astronauts, as if either leaves you with a decidedly negative experience, space travel may not be for you (though NASA astronauts have expressed in the past that some became ill on the simulators and parabolic flights while still being perfectly fine in space).

Blackarrow
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posted 05-29-2007 06:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Robert! As always, you are a mine of information!

It occurs to me that there is one way in our everyday lives we can simulate an increase in g-force without acceleration. If you lie in a bath which has enough water to support your weight without actually allowing you to float, and if you pull out the plug, there is a definite feeling of increased gravity as the supporting water drains away. Sadly, it's hardly an option for a shuttle simulator.

lewarren
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posted 05-30-2007 02:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lewarren   Click Here to Email lewarren     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Laying in a bath or shower is also good practice for learning how to urinate in a supine position (i.e., on the launch pad).

Blackarrow
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posted 05-30-2007 05:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Too much information...

Ken Havekotte
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posted 05-30-2007 05:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed!

mdmyer
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posted 05-30-2007 09:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is there an extra fee for the Shuttle Launch Experience or is it included in the admission fee?

capoetc
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posted 05-30-2007 09:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My understanding is that it is included with your KSC admission.

Ben
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posted 05-30-2007 09:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yea, it is included.

capcom9
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posted 05-31-2007 05:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for capcom9   Click Here to Email capcom9     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can you do the simulator as many times as you like while you're there, or are you limited to one launch only per admission ticket?

tncmaxq
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posted 05-31-2007 07:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for tncmaxq   Click Here to Email tncmaxq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am so eager to go on the ride. I hope it does not make me dizzy, as some of the Disney rides have done in recent years. Must happen with age.

So next weekend I hope to see a real launch, and then experience what it must feel like to be inside the vehicle.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-31-2007 08:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by capcom9:
Can you do the simulator as many times as you like while you're there, or are you limited to one launch only per admission ticket?
You can ride as many times as you desire.


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Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





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