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  Roscosmos cosmonaut detachment (2018)

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Author Topic:   Roscosmos cosmonaut detachment (2018)
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39141
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-07-2018 05:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
To mark the anniversary of the creation of its cosmonaut corps, Roscosmos and the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center has released a poster picturing the 26 current members of the cosmonaut detachment.
On this day, 58 years ago, the cosmonaut detachment was officially created. However, the first significant date can be considered 1958, when the Institute of Aviation Medicine began preparatory work on the selection of candidates for the first space flight. In the same year, Sergei Pavlovich Korolev presented to the government a note on the prospect of creating a heavy satellite, within which a person can be on Earth's orbit.

At the moment, there are 26 people in the cosmonaut detachment. "Today the cosmonaut detachment is a good fusion of youth and experience," said the commander of the cosmonaut corps, Hero of the Russian Federation, the pilot-cosmonaut of the Russian Federation, Oleg Kononenko.

David C
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Posts: 736
From: Pasadena, CA
Registered: Apr 2012

posted 03-07-2018 05:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An entire one solitary woman!

Nice poster though.

SkyMan1958
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Posts: 744
From: CA.
Registered: Jan 2011

posted 03-07-2018 08:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David C:
An entire one solitary woman!
My thoughts exactly.

Neil DC
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Posts: 103
From: Middletown, NJ, USA
Registered: May 2010

posted 03-07-2018 09:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Neil DC   Click Here to Email Neil DC     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As ever the cosmonaut group selections are tough, picking more candidates then they can really afford to fly and a relatively high drop out rate. Candidates almost forced to drop out. Now made tougher by selling third seats to NASA, etc.

It is always great to see their rookies finally fly. Seems tougher to achieve then their NASA counterparts.

issman1
Member

Posts: 1000
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 03-08-2018 02:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David C:
An entire one solitary woman!

CSA and ESA both have one solitary woman while JAXA none. Flight opportunities are also severely limited until the new American crew capsules come on-line.

Delta7
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Posts: 1397
From: Bluffton IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 03-08-2018 10:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
True. However neither JAXA, the ESA or the CSA have their own human spaceflight launch capability and depend on joint programs with NASA and the Russians. Their astronaut corps have always been small.

The fact that only four female cosmonauts have flown since 1961 stands out percentage-wise. The United States has flown more women than the total of ESA, JAXA and CSA astronaut selectees (male and female) combined.

David C
Member

Posts: 736
From: Pasadena, CA
Registered: Apr 2012

posted 03-08-2018 01:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by issman1:
CSA and ESA both have one solitary woman while JAXA none.
I would say that the current sizes of the astronaut corps of Canada (2, no females) and JAXA (7, no females) make them statistically irrelevant (nothing personal).

ESA has an active corps of 14 with one female. I'm uncertain of the active Taikonaut group composition. NASA has an assignable pool of 44 including 14 females.

As mentioned earlier, it's not just about the current sizes of the various professional pools but also about historical flight statistics. Using my preferred 50 statute mile definition:

  • USSR/Russia 3% of cosmonauts were female
  • USA 13%
  • ESA nations (difficult because not all were ESA astronauts when they flew, but lumping them all together for convenience) 7%
  • Canada 22%
  • Japan 17%
  • China 18%
Of all the nations there, the USSR/Russia has both the lowest percentage and in my opinion the least reason. Unlike the USA the USSR human spacecraft philosophy was highly automated from the very start. This allowed them to crew vehicles with personnel that did not have to be a self limiting pool of test pilots — something many of their engineers were very keen to make use of.

After Tereshkova there was a gap of 19 years before Savitskaya, despite having several trained female cosmonauts. Regardless of Savitskaya's qualifications, it appears that her first flight was prompted solely by a desire to make another propaganda point against the USA.

Nearly three times as many foreign females have flown aboard Soviet/ Russian spacecraft as their own women! Plainly the USSR/Russia has no problems flying females of other nations aboard their ships — they just don't fly their own very often.

I find this very disappointing from the nation that gave birth to human spaceflight but hardly very surprising. Last year's relaxation of Russian law regarding domestic violence caps off their attitude to women pretty clearly I'd say.

I make no apologies for bringing politics into it. There are no longer any engineering or biological question marks. It's all about social attitudes, which is very much part of politics.

dcfowler1
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Posts: 64
From: Eugene, OR
Registered: May 2006

posted 03-09-2018 01:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dcfowler1   Click Here to Email dcfowler1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Canada has four astronauts, one female.

David C
Member

Posts: 736
From: Pasadena, CA
Registered: Apr 2012

posted 03-09-2018 04:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No it doesn't. It currently has two qualified astronauts and two astronaut candidates. Sidey is still a candidate. I've only listed qualified and available astronauts, so no NASA management astronauts for example.

BMckay
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Posts: 2836
From: MA, USA
Registered: Sep 2002

posted 03-31-2018 04:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMckay   Click Here to Email BMckay     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I met one of the new cosmonauts the other day and jokingly asked if he could sign the 8x10 photo I did of the detachment but he said no. I knew that going in but it was worth the effort. I did give him my copies.

All times are CT (US)

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