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  Deputy Administrator Lori Garver departs NASA

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Author Topic:   Deputy Administrator Lori Garver departs NASA
Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 08-06-2013 08:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A personal note (via NASA) from Deputy Administrator Lori Garver regarding her announced departure from NASA.
I just announced that I will be joining the Air Line Pilots Association next month as the organization's general manager.

As you can imagine, leaving the team of incredibly talented professionals at NASA isn't easy to do. NASA is a very special place and what we do helps make the world a better place. Over the last four years, we’ve worked to advance the transformation of NASA into a 21st century agency of innovation. I'm so proud of the team that has helped create NASA's growing space technology effort, increased innovation in Earth science, broadened international cooperation and forged new private sector partnerships in areas such as sub-orbital science, hosted payloads, lunar robotics, asteroid detection and space transportation.

Thank you all who are helping make this progress possible. I appreciate your warm wishes and look forward to my next challenge!

NASA release

Statements on NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver's Announced Departure

The following are statements from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren about NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver's announced departure from the agency, effective Sept. 6.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden:

"I have had the pleasure and honor of working side by side with Lori for the past four years, as we sought to position the agency for 21st century spaceflight, scientific discovery and deep space exploration. She has been an indispensable partner in our efforts to keep NASA on a trajectory of progress and innovation. In a time of great change and challenge, she has been a remarkable leader who has consistently shown great vision and commitment to NASA and the aerospace industry.

"Lori has led the way on so many of the Obama Administration's space priorities, including our commercial crew and cargo program, the re-establishment of a space technology mission directorate, our use of challenges and prizes, and our unwavering commitment to diversity and inclusion. As one of only a few top women leaders in the aerospace industry, she has been an extraordinary role model for young girls, inspiring them to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and pursue their dreams in space and here on Earth.

"Lori will always be a great friend to me and to our agency."

Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren:

"Lori Garver has worked tirelessly in support of this administration’s aerospace priorities, from human space exploration and technology development to Earth science and aeronautics research. She ensured that U.S. taxpayers were getting the most for their money from NASA with innovative public-private partnerships in space and on Earth, and her focus on getting more women and other underrepresented groups engaged in science, technology, engineering, and math was just as important.

"On behalf of President Obama, as well as myself, I want to thank Lori for her leadership, dedication, and work on behalf of the American people, and wish her all the best in future endeavors."

Headshot
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Posts: 201
From: Streamwood, IL USA
Registered: Feb 2012

posted 08-06-2013 09:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good!

Now, hopefully, Bolden will leave too.

Just maybe we can get someone who will stand up for strong space and science programs, like Michael Griffin did before he got canned. We need strong people who believe in NASA and aren't unequivocal "yes" men like Bolden/Garver.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-06-2013 09:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Michael Griffin "stood up" for strong engineering programs, but sacrificed science along the way. He attempted to compensate for the congressionally-underfunded Constellation by shuttering human research and life sciences, not to mention the International Space Station itself.

It is patently wrong to suggest that Lori Garver didn't believe in NASA — the truth is quite the opposite — nor was she (or Bolden) "yes" men. You may disagree with the policies they supported, but to suggest they didn't believe in the programs they put forth is demonstrating a lack of knowledge about both individuals.

Frankly, there is no need here or justification to vilify anyone — Griffin, Garver and Bolden included.

Jim Behling
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From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-06-2013 10:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Headshot:
We need strong people who believe in NASA and aren't unequivocal "yes" men like Bolden/Garver.
NASA administrators serve at the pleasure of the President and are part of his administration. The NASA administrator can not operate independently of the President. NASA programs are a direct reflection of the people's wishes since they vote for the president. NASA would not be much different with Griffin in place as part of the Obama administration.

issman1
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Posts: 892
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 08-06-2013 12:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Headshot:
... hopefully, Bolden will leave too.

To be fair, Bolden might have been a great shuttle pilot and commander but as NASA administrator is at the beck-and-call of powerful individuals and lobbies.

What makes you so sure his successor will fair any better?

The only way NASA will get of out its present diabolical situation is if American public opinion sways the politicians. Space travel is not a priority in most peoples lives and until this changes the head of any space agency is a tool.

dabolton
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From: Round Lake, IL, US
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 08-06-2013 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton   Click Here to Email dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bolden was on the shortlist for NASA administrator just before 9/11. Who knows where we would be if he had been chosen 12 years ago.

Jim Behling
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From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-06-2013 01:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by issman1:
...powerful individuals and lobbies.
Who are these? Congress people from states with NASA centers? Musk? Far from it.

Commercial Spaceflight Federation? Many of its members are also members of the Aerospace Industries Association.

randy
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From: West Jordan, Utah USA
Registered: Dec 1999

posted 08-06-2013 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for randy   Click Here to Email randy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am sorry to see her leave. Best of luck in the future.

Cozmosis22
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From: Texas * Earth
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posted 08-06-2013 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
She will be remembered as the woman who was second in command as NASA squandered it's position of manned spaceflight superiority. And one can only wonder, if she was supposedly such an advocate for space travel why is she now going for a cushy job at the "Air Line Pilots Association"?

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 08-06-2013 03:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Cozmosis22:
...squandered it's position of manned spaceflight superiority.
The United States leads the world in manned spaceflight. The International Space Station is the largest human spaceflight project in history and the U.S. is its leader — as has been reaffirmed by the international partners.

Besides, the decision to create the gap in U.S. human launches was made five years before Lori Garver took office.

quote:
...why is she now going for a cushy job at the "Air Line Pilots Association"?
There may be ethical considerations based on the restrictions placed on executive branch employees, but whatever Garver's reasons, they in no way invalidate her long history advocating for human spaceflight.

Delta7
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From: Ossian IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 08-06-2013 03:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Cozmosis22:
She will be remembered as the woman who was second in command as NASA squandered it's position of manned spaceflight superiority.
So if we had a "better" deputy administrator we'd be on our way to Mars now?

NASA is a bureaucracy plain and simple. It's leadership positions are bureaucrat positions no matter who fills them. They don't make government policy, they implement it. Winston Churchill couldn't have made a difference if he were in that post, lofty speeches about "exploring the heavens in the rilles and craters and boulder covered plains of distant worlds through blood, sweat, toil and bloody big budgets .." nonwithstanding ...

Linda Voss
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From: Arlington, VA
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 08-06-2013 11:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Linda Voss   Click Here to Email Linda Voss     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA may be bureaucratic, but it's not bureaucratic enough to have the momentum to enable us to stay any given course for more than 5 years. We're on Mars. We've accomplished the most incredible interplanetary missions in the last decade known to man. We're in the midst of a renaissance in knowledge of the Red Planet. The problems with humans to Mars are a lot bigger than Bolden or Garver. America is not yet big enough to step up to them. I think one of the most crucial steps we've taken recently is the mission to the Van Allen Belts. Without more direct knowledge of the nature of the cosmic radiation outside those belts, we can't begin to address one of the most confounding issues--how to protect organic life from radiation damage in manned space flight. There are some questions you can only get a chance to answer by working for the Government.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 08-07-2013 12:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Behling:
NASA programs are a direct reflection of the people's wishes since they vote for the president.

And what the people is something that is immediate - whether it's in the space program or a new road. Tell them they'll see a benefit soon, the people will support it. Tell them the benefits are five, 10 or 20 years down the road, and see what your support base is.

That, and the NASA budget has never been "sold" to the people. Given present circumstances in the world, it is easier to sell the Defense Department budget than NASA's. If there was more of a threat from asteroids and gamma rays and the like than from terrorists, things would be different.

Tykeanaut
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From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-07-2013 02:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When will governments realise that investing in the space industry creates employment here on the ground and inspires future generations?

Jim Behling
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From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 08-07-2013 07:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Inspiring future generations is not goal of a space program. There are many other easier and cheaper ways to do that.

Fra Mauro
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From: Maspeth, NY
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posted 08-08-2013 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Her leaving is what usually happens in a President's second term. Appointees who can find better, more permanent, and even less stressful jobs do so. Good Luck to Ms. Garver, a sincere person who has a vision for space exploration. However, it is not my hopes for NASA, so I am not sad to see her go.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-06-2013 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Message from NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver

NASA's Deputy Administrator sent this message to NASA employees on leaving the agency.

Farewell Message to the NASA Workforce

t has been a great privilege to serve as your Deputy Administrator. As I close out this term of service, I want to express my gratitude to the entire NASA family for your efforts and achievements. Together we have undergone a transformation that is already building a more sustainable and beneficial 21st Century space agency. We've worked to align NASA with the critical national objectives of economic growth, technology innovation, environmental stewardship, cutting edge science and global leadership.

Throughout my career, I have been honored to serve NASA in several different positions. When I arrived in early November, 2008 as the lead for the Obama transition, we were facing many critical issues as an agency. Transitions are hard, and NASA's was no exception. Thankfully, there were many of you who reached out to help us understand this amazing institution and worked with us to advance the agency.

We were able to immediately extend Space Shuttle flights for two additional missions in order to gain the knowledge from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and to fully outfit the International Space Station until we would again be transporting cargo and crew with U.S. vehicles from U.S. soil. We created NASA's growing space technology effort, increased innovation in aeronautics Earth and space science, launched carried out the Mars Science Lab mission, broadened international cooperation and forged new private sector partnerships in areas such as sub-orbital science, hosted payloads, lunar robotics, asteroid detection and space transportation.

These changes have allowed NASA to deliver better science, and more advanced technologies to sustain its global leadership position now and for the future.

Internally, we worked to spearhead critical initiatives in the areas of early career hiring, more productive relationships with our labor unions, diversity and transparency. Our priority for NASA has been to continually deliver cutting edge, cost efficient, successful, relevant missions that will keep the United States at the forefront of aeronautics, environmental monitoring, space science, and exploration.

On Monday, I start my new job as General Manager of the Air Line Pilots Association. As I take on this new challenge of assisting pilots and advancing the nation's critical aviation industry, I take with me the inspiration and spirit that is embodied in NASA.

Thank you for the opportunity to be a part of the family.

Space Shuttle Endeavour
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posted 09-25-2013 10:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Space Shuttle Endeavour     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone know who is going to be the new deputy administrator?

Robert Pearlman
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Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-26-2013 12:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No replacement has been named. (As the position needs to be confirmed by the Senate, given the larger issues currently facing the legislative branch, NASA may go without a deputy administrator for a while.)

All times are CT (US)

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