Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Explorers & Workers
  Astronaut Clay Anderson's post-NASA career

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Astronaut Clay Anderson's post-NASA career
Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2206
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 11-10-2011 04:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In an interview with the Des Moines Register, Clayton Anderson says he doesn't think he will fly again.
He had some choice words for Mission Control about space station procedures and life, and the bosses didn't want to hear it, he said.

"They told me I was too candid and blunt with Mission Control and others, and that my skill set did not match long-term space missions," Anderson said...

He has logged 167 days in space, including 38 hours outside the space station on six space walks.

Now, Anderson is helping other astronauts prepare for missions, with one eye on other jobs. He isn't sure whether he'll stay at NASA.

"I've been taken off active status," said Anderson, an Omaha native who considers Ashland, Neb., his hometown. "I've been made a management astronaut," supporting other astronauts' missions, he said.

chappy
Member

Posts: 217
From: Cardiff, S. Wales, UK
Registered: Apr 2006

posted 11-10-2011 06:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for chappy   Click Here to Email chappy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Its seems that NASA is not listening to the astronauts on safety, health, etc. Whenever the astronauts criticise anything then they (the astronauts) are removed off the active status by the management. I think it's being harsh by these so-called management, because they don't like being told do they?

I believe astronauts do have rights to say something if they are not happy about it. They (the astronauts) are the ones that fly the machine, not the management! Clayton being removed off the active status is being harsh. Do you think this is right or wrong?

Delta7
Member

Posts: 1177
From: Ossian IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 11-10-2011 06:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's typical government Modus Operandi. Rule #! of self-preservation: do NOT make waves. Sad, but fact.

AJ
Member

Posts: 510
From: Plattsburgh, NY, United States
Registered: Feb 2009

posted 11-10-2011 07:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ   Click Here to Email AJ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Seems like we've seen this repeatedly over the years, sad to say. You'd think management would actually want to take into account the opinions of the astronauts. But old habits die hard and alas, we've seen that in many cases management doesn't want to change unless it absolutely has to.

dtemple
Member

Posts: 605
From: Longview, Texas, USA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted 11-10-2011 10:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dtemple   Click Here to Email dtemple     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If management is truly that unreasonable about the opinions of the astronauts then there will almost certainly be another horrific accident like Challenger and Columbia - both of which were entirely preventable.

moorouge
Member

Posts: 1536
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 11-11-2011 01:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any accident is preventable - with 20/20 hindsight. Unfortunately the real world doesn't work with this ability. Very sad, but true.

issman1
Member

Posts: 892
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 11-11-2011 02:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One need only read the book "Dragonfly" to know that if NASA astronauts are too blunt that is effectively the end of their flying careers.

Having watched recent pre-flight, in-flight and post-flight press conferences you hear the same dull answer to reporters questions as if NASA astronauts are too afraid to be candid.

It could explain why some astronauts have never flown or just once or twice before retiring (Charles Camarda comes to mind). I sympathize with Mr. Anderson, but at least he has options with commercial companies if NASA is too cumbersome and restrictive.

Skylon
Member

Posts: 146
From:
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 11-11-2011 09:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skylon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I seem to recall some observing he was rather blunt on the air-to-ground loop during his ISS flight. At least he still had a shuttle flight after flying an ISS expedition (STS-131), so whatever he said, it didn't totally ruin his shot at going up again.

His comments also have me wondering about the large number of "management" astronauts, with, at the moment, no clearly defined role. Are these just the astronauts who are not eligible or not interested to fly ISS missions? If short duration missions became available could they suddenly find themselves "active" again?

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3594
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 11-14-2011 05:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did Clay Anderson ever say if his disagreements with Mission Control were over issues of flight safety? For all we know, he may have disgreed with them over more mundane issues such as when the crew ate their breakfast.

Sometimes being blunt isn't a good thing, if one doesn't pick their battles very wisely. And let's face it, some astronauts may simply be difficult to work with.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27686
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-14-2011 06:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Des Moines Register interview describes Anderson's objections as follows:
He had some choice words for Mission Control about space station procedures and life, and the bosses didn't want to hear it, he said.
From what I recall listening to him during his time aboard the station, his contested exchanges with the ground were about logistics and scheduling.

dogcrew5369
Member

Posts: 557
From: Statesville, NC
Registered: Mar 2009

posted 01-13-2012 05:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Skylon:
His comments also have me wondering about the large number of "management" astronauts, with, at the moment, no clearly defined role.
Could the larger number of "management" astronauts coincide with the height limitations of the Soyuz? I haven't looked into anyone's height, but there is a height limitation. I know Massimino would be out of luck.

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2223
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 01-15-2012 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've had some talks with Clay. A few of them were interview related and some are private. As such, I am NOT going to reveal the contents here. I have no knowledge of what he said to Mission Control either and honestly I had no idea about his Des Moines Register interview either until now (even if I did, I couldn't say much anyway).

I got the feeling though that from just after 131, Clay likely knew it was going to be his last flight just looking at the numbers. His own path to becoming an astronaut was a classic example of "never give up" as he sent his application in a record number of times before being accepted and was in the process of looking for a new job when he got an interview for the 1996 class. He didn't get the job in 96, but he knew his shot at the 98 class was excellent and the rest was history. As it is, he has treated ALL his time as an astronaut at NASA as a priviledge and an honor (as do the rest of the candidates for the most part who joined up). If he had a blunt fiery nature, I doubt he would have gotten a flight. Maybe such a nature properly channeled would have gotten him a flight sooner. But his ISS expedition was delayed when one of the Russian cosmonauts assigned to his crew had a heart attack and got medically discharged from the program (meaning the crew got re-assigned) and Columbia didn't help matters either. He did a great job on orbit though and his accomplishments speak well of his career, from flying with two Russians with whom he had hardly trained with and the three of them getting along quite well to performing a staged EVA with Fyodr.

With having no knowledge on what he discussed with mission control, I do not believe it was anything safety related. So I would stow speculation on that avenue right now. I also do not believe it was anything on the grand scale of an Apollo 7 mutiny either, for those who might think it was something THAT big to warrant a grounding.

It "may" (and using may in quotes because as I said, I have NO knowledge on what was discussed) have been in regards to the training cycle for an ISS long duration mission as the current cycle has it at three years typically with about half of that taking place in Russia (and Clay was in that cycle longer due to the crew shakeup and Columbia). To my knowledge, it remains that way for both first time flyers and veterans. One might think if the vets have been through it before that their cycle might be cut back a little. But nope, all that training has to be done again, whether it soaked in last time or not and regardless of the mission goals. This can put a strain on families as typically the wives and kids can't move to Russia when an astronaut heads over there, except for maybe a two week vacation trip.

From that standpoint, with Clay likely thinking in the back of his head that two missions was going to be it for him, he likely approached certain topics in discussions with Mission Control with typical midwestern Nebraskan bluntness. People in my part of the country respect honesty on certain matters and with Clay being raised here, he has that trait. So he brought up what he felt he needed to bring up rather than trying to hold back and hope for a flight that would likely never come anyway. So, if "hypothetically" he were to say he would consider training for an ISS flight if the training cycle were shorter, than you of course know what the response would be when they have plenty of astronauts who have not flown yet itching to do what they can to get a seat.

Knowing Clay, he probably doesn't consider this a setback though and even though he now knows he won't fly again, he will throw everything behind his training responsibilities until retirement. Don't forget he was a NASA employee out of college (and he did internships before that), so he has seen a lot from 1982 onwards. He can retire with a full civil servant pension in a couple years and his wife has been at NASA a long time as well. He knows the NASA system at JSC as well as anybody and he isn't an outsider who has been brought into the astronaut corps.

Whatever comes after NASA, I know Clay will be successful at what he does. In this state, he has the noteriety of being the first Nebraska native to become an astronaut (which in this state makes him a bit of a celebrity). But, knowing Clay, he isn't going to take a job just on name recognition. He'll find something where he can use his talents to their fullest.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2206
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 01-17-2013 05:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is Clay Anderson retiring? Saw on Twitter he had a cake for his "last spacewalk" in the NBL, as well as lots of well wishes.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27686
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-24-2013 07:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Clay Anderson on Twitter:
Calling all Tweeps. Guess you know now that I have decided to retire after 30 years with NASA. It's been an awesome ride!

Ask you continue to follow and be part of my next adventure; whatever it turns out to be. Will be speaking and finishing my book! Stay tuned...and thanks!

Realized today after 30 years; 15 as an astronaut, 15 as an engineer. Symmetry is kind of cool! Last day is January 31, 2013.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2206
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 01-25-2013 05:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, he will retire:

"Anything is a possibility," the 53-year-old Anderson said. "No doors are closed."

He and his family will remain in Houston for now, he said, but they could move back to Nebraska. He's looking forward to finishing a book he's been writing for several years, and he will do some more public speaking.

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2223
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 01-27-2013 08:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, he will retire as the story made it into the Omaha World Herald yesterday. The Federal Government has authorized NASA to offer early retirement as an option for some who qualify and Clay decided to take that option.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27686
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-04-2013 04:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Astronaut Clayton C. Anderson Leaves Agency

NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson has retired from the space agency. Anderson flew in space twice, first in 2007 as a flight engineer for Expeditions 15 and 16 aboard the International Space Station, and finally as a mission specialist on STS-131 in 2010.

Anderson began his 30-year NASA career in 1983 as an engineer in the Mission Planning and Analysis Division at Johnson Space Center. He was selected as an astronaut in 1998. He trained as a backup crew member for Expeditions 12, 13 and 14. He most recently served in management and as space station Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM). Anderson conducted six spacewalks and has more than 167 days of spaceflight experience.

"Clay will certainly be missed in the Astronaut Office, especially for his technical expertise. His combination of shuttle, station long duration, and spacewalk experience was extremely valuable to us," said Bob Behnken, chief of the Astronaut Office. "We wish him continued success in future endeavors, and know he will continue to captivate whenever and wherever he shares his spaceflight experiences."

Anderson holds a Master of Science in aerospace engineering from Iowa State University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in physics from Hastings College.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2206
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 09-11-2013 07:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anderson is going to Iowa State University as an aerospace engineering faculty fellow.
Anderson will work with freshmen aerospace engineering students and help design research projects for the department’s students and faculty. Anderson begins his new job in October.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27686
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-11-2013 07:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Iowa State University release
Astronaut Clayton Anderson joins Iowa State engineering faculty

Clayton Anderson, an Iowa State University graduate and former NASA astronaut, will join the university as a distinguished faculty fellow in aerospace engineering.

Anderson, a native of Nebraska, received his master's degree in aerospace engineering from Iowa State in 1983. He joined NASA's Johnson Space Center that same year, working in the Mission Planning and Analysis Division, Mission Operations Directorate, and managing the center's emergency operations center before being selected as an astronaut candidate in 1998.

"It's not every day that we get an opportunity to hire an 'astronaut in residence,'" noted Iowa State University President Steven Leath. "I am thrilled our students will learn from Clayton's knowledge and experiences as they foster their own dreams for careers in science and even space travel."

A veteran of two space flights, Anderson has logged 167 days in space, and more than 38 hours of Extravehicular Activity (spacewalks) at the International Space Station.

On his first trip in 2007, Anderson launched with the crew of STS-117 and spent five months aboard the ISS, performing three spacewalks and using the station's robotic arm to position equipment for a new docking port.

Anderson's second mission to the International Space Station (STS-131) in April 2010 was a resupply mission that dropped off 27,000 pounds of supplies and equipment. During the trip he performed three additional spacewalks, spending 20 hours outside the station.

"I am honored and excited that Iowa State University would consider me worthy of the position of Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Aerospace Engineering," said Anderson. "I look forward to doing whatever I can to help the students and faculty of the engineering college, and the entire university, move into the future!"

In his new position, Anderson will work with freshmen aerospace engineering students, engaging them in hands-on problem solving, and helping design cutting-edge research projects for the aerospace department's students and faculty.

"Iowa State's students and faculty will benefit from this appointment in many ways," said Rich Wlezien, chair of the university's Department of Aerospace Engineering. "In addition to his career as an astronaut, Clayton also has experience in all aspects of human space flight that will be highly relevant to our students as the era of commercial space access emerges."

Anderson will begin his service at Iowa State in October.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement