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  Astronaut Garrett Reisman's post-NASA career

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Author Topic:   Astronaut Garrett Reisman's post-NASA career
Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-04-2011 07:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Astronaut Garrett Reisman Leaves Agency

NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman has left the agency to return to private industry. Reisman is a veteran of two spaceflight missions, including a long-duration mission on the International Space Station.

"I had the pleasure of working with Garrett in space during Expedition 16," said Peggy Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "He is an incredibly accomplished professional and well-known for his great sense of humor. We wish him the best in this new phase of his career, but we will miss him greatly."

Reisman, who holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering, joined NASA in 1998. Before flying in space, he served in multiple technical roles including work supporting robotics and the advanced vehicles branch of the Astronaut Office.

Reisman's first spaceflight mission was as flight engineer during Expeditions 16 and 17 on the station in 2008. During his three months aboard, he performed a seven-hour spacewalk, conducted numerous robotics activities and participated in the installation of the Japanese Kibo laboratory and its logistics module.

Reisman visited the station again during his second spaceflight, STS-132 in May 2010. He conducted two additional spacewalks during the mission, logging 14 more hours outside.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 03-04-2011 07:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX release
Astronaut Garrett Reisman Joins SpaceX

Joining Astronaut Safety and Mission Assurance Team as SpaceX Prepares to Carry Astronauts

Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) is proud to announce that NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman is joining the company as a senior engineer working on astronaut safety and mission assurance.

"We're excited about the great team that we are building. Our talent is the key to our success. Garrett's experience designing and using spaceflight hardware will be invaluable as we prepare the spacecraft that will carry the next generation of explorers," said Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO and Chief Technology Officer.

Dr. Reisman will join former NASA astronaut Ken Bowersox's team in preparing SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft to carry astronauts. In December, Dragon became the first commercial spacecraft to successfully return from orbit. In the coming years, NASA will use Dragon for at least 12 cargo missions to the International Space Station, creating strong flight experience before the first manned mission.

"I am excited to help SpaceX because I care deeply about the future of human spaceflight," said Dr. Reisman. "I see commercial spaceflight as our country's best option for a robust and sustainable human spaceflight future."

Beyond safety, Dr. Reisman's experience as an operator of both American and Russian spaceflight hardware will help SpaceX in the development of human interfaces including controls, displays, seats, suits and environmental control systems.

"After the Space Shuttle's last flight later this year, America will be dependent on our Russian partners for getting NASA astronauts to space. NASA's commercial crew development program is our only hope for a quick, safe and affordable alternative, and SpaceX is well-positioned to lead this effort given the strength of their performance during the NASA COTS program," said Reisman.

Both the Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft have been designed from the start to one day carry astronauts.

Dr. Reisman comes to SpaceX from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration where he has served since 1998. He has flown on two Space Shuttle missions, which include launching with STS-123 and returning with the STS-124 crew, as well as flying on STS-132. During these two missions, he logged over 3 months in space including over 21 hours of extravehicular activity (EVA) in 3 spacewalks. Dr. Reisman served with both the Expedition-16 and the Expedition-17 crews as a Flight Engineer aboard the International Space Station. Early in his time at NASA he was assigned to the Astronaut Office Robotics Branch, worked in the Astronaut Office Advanced Vehicles Branch, and was a crewmember on NEEMO V in 2003, living on the bottom of the sea in the Aquarius habitat for two weeks.

Dr. Reisman holds a B.S. in Economics and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics from the University of Pennsylvania, a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology. He is an FAA Certified Flight Instructor. Dr. Reisman is from Parsippany, New Jersey.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-14-2011 05:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space.com has published an interview with Garrett Reisman about his new position at SpaceX.
Congratulations on your new gig! What prompted the move?

That's the big question. It's hard to give you a succinct answer to that. 'Cause being an astronaut, I'll be totally honest with you, is the coolest thing ever and a very, very difficult thing to walk away from voluntarily.

After my last flight I kind of sat back and thought, I could stay at NASA and fly again, it would just be a matter of waiting my turn which could take a while. But you know we have a lot of new astronauts that are waiting for their first chance to fly, and I felt like, well, I'm 43 years old and I'm at the age where, if I was going to start a second career, it was time to get one with it.

And I saw what was going on in the commercial space area and I really believe strongly that this is the future of human spaceflight, and I had a strong desire to get involved with that.

So that's really what led me to make this decision, which was not an easy one to make.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 03-15-2011 09:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In addition to Garrett welcoming a baby boy to his family, Garrett also pointed out that in order to fly again - or for any NASA astronaut to fly to ISS - requires a 2-1/2 year commitment at Star City, and that he didn't want to undergo such a separation from his family again.

Add to that crews have been selected as far as late 2013/early 2014, and realistically the earliest anyone can expect to fly if they're at the bottom of the queue is 2015. So if you've been as astronut for 10 or more years and flown one flight, and are in your forties, do you stay or not?

issman1
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posted 03-15-2011 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
So if you've been as astronaut for 10 or more years and flown one flight, and are in your forties, do you stay or not?

NASA astronauts selected in 2000, 2004 and of course 2009 stand the best chance of being assigned to ISS expedition crews than those from earlier classes. So most will likely stay active after the final shuttle mission (I would).

And with Dr. Reisman joining SpaceX, a clear NASA connection exists. NASA pilot-astronauts should be on the initial Dragon crews.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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From: Toms River, NJ,USA
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posted 03-15-2011 02:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Garrett, to the best of my recollection, did not indicate to me he would be flying on Dragon. He did state why he took the job was not because of any perceived flight opportunities with SpaceX (e.g., he didn't take the job because he thought he would be flying. Garrett's not like Searfoss, who is a test pilot with Xcor.)

issman1
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posted 03-15-2011 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I didn't think Dr. Reisman joined SpaceX in the hope of flying on the Dragon. But his input, and that of Mr. Bowersox, will be invaluable when Mr. Musk touts for business with NASA.

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