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Author Topic:   Future of the NASA astronaut corps
mjanovec
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posted 02-03-2010 02:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We've had discussions in other threads about the cancellation of Constellation, but have only briefly touched on the impact to the astronauts at NASA. I think it would be interesting to discuss the future of the astronaut corps, assuming the president's proposed plan for privatization is carried through. For the sake of argument, let's assume the plan does work and commercial interests ultimately develop rockets and manned spacecraft. Where will the pool of astronauts originate that fly these missions?

I see a couple of different possibilities:

  • The astronaut corps will remain essentially the same. NASA will hire commercial spacecraft and rockets to undertake their planned missions... and will use their own force of highly trained astronauts to carry out those missions.

  • NASA and the commercial sector will each have their own ranks of astronauts, much like the government and the private sector have their own ranks of pilots to fly aircraft. NASA will use their astronauts to fly certain exploration missions, while the private sector will use their own astronauts to fly missions more routine in nature (re-supply missions, space tourist flights, etc.). Perhaps some sharing of talent from both pools will also occur, with private sector pilot-astronauts manning the controls and NASA sector scientist-astronauts conducting experiments and overseeing payload operations.

  • NASA will get out of the astronaut business altogether and contract flight crews from the private sector in the same manner that they hire private firms to design and build spacecraft. Astronauts will be hired to complete missions on an as-needed basis.
I suspect the eventual reality will probably be the second option listed above. But it's interesting to ponder the possibilities and realize that there might be career "astronauts" that eventually encompass a larger pool of men and women that operate for both the public and private sector. (I suppose one could argue that the payload specialists from the 80s and 90s were the first step in that direction.)

What do others think? And again, for the sake of argument, let's just assume the proposed commercialization of spacecraft and rockets is undertaken... if not sooner, then most likely eventually. Please... no doom and gloom assessments for the future of manned spaceflight.

jimsz
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posted 02-03-2010 05:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for jimsz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think those that wish to travel to space will move to whomever is actually going into space.

NASA using private contractors to bus people to the ISS is not as close as they make it seem.

It will either be using the jump seat aboard a Russian craft as a NASA Astronaut or wait years and possibly their whole life to fly aboard a NASA manned craft.

Either way I am sure there are many discussions about career moves taking place.

Delta7
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posted 02-03-2010 09:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If private companies wind up ferrying astronauts to the ISS, do they drop off the crew members and go home, or do they remain docked for 6 months? If they drop and go, how do you meet the emergency return requirement? That would probably require development of a separate vehicle dedicated to that purpose and left docked to the ISS, or Soyuz taxi missions dedicated to swapping out vehicles.

Any company intending to use it's own astronaut corps would have to develop it's own training program and facilities, including simulators. I suspect if that turns out to be the case, they would look to hire astronauts and other experienced people from NASA.

Whether NASA maintains it's astronaut corps as is, pares it down significantly and/or contracts those roles to private companies, I think there will be employment opportunities for current astronauts regardless. A private company could even employ someone who has already retired from NASA. Throw in a few corporate sponsors, and in a few years we may see Pam Melroy walking out to the pad wearing a suit with a McDonald's Golden Arch on the back!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-03-2010 09:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delta7:
...Soyuz taxi missions dedicated to swapping out vehicles.
Regardless of what happens with the U.S. commercial crew services, it is expected (at least as of now) that Soyuz will remain the emergency crew return vehicle for the ISS. Russia's provision of the Soyuz as a lifeboat is part of their partnership in the ISS.

Delta7
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posted 02-03-2010 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Which means that if half the ISS crew is flying up and back in a U.S. commercial vehicle, there would have to be dedicated Soyuz swap missions, which also likely means one or two seats for space tourists on such flights.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-06-2010 10:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Today, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden held a press conference at the Kennedy Space Center, where I was able to raise the question about the future of the NASA astronaut corps. Here is a transcript of that exchange.
collectSPACE.com:

A couple of weeks ago when you were in Israel, you made the comment that the question might be coming 'Do we need astronauts?', so if I can adapt that question a little bit, there are currently 80 astronauts in the Astronaut Office, 14 more training, what have you told them -- if you have talked to the Astronaut Office -- about the need of an office that size, and what have they given you as feedback to the announcement of this new plan?

NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden:

"I've had a number of conversations with friends in the Astronaut Office, but definitely with their leadership and I am going to Houston right after the launch because I am going to take some time to go and visit with the folks in the Astronaut Office, just to talk to them and get some feedback from them.

"So I haven't fully done what you've said, but in past conversations, the Astronaut Office is going down in number for a variety of reasons.

"Some of the people who were there for shuttle, like me, that wanted to go to space and love living and working in space but can't exactly rationalize with themselves that 'I want to spend six months in space?'. Six months, when shuttle leaves, will be the short time to stay in space and there are a number of people in the Astronaut Office that just to date have not brought themselves to say that that is something they want to do.

"I can pick on my own service for example, up until now, for those of you who pay any attention to the service representation on the International Space Station, up until now there has never been a United States Marine who has done a six month tour on the International Space Station. My reason is, after you go to Afghanistan and Iraq and other places, why would you want to spend six months on the International Space Station? Now I say that in jest... but I am told that now we have Marines in the Astronaut Office who are starting to say, 'You know, we really want to be a part of this and we want to do a tour of six months on the International Space Station.

"Those are reasons you are going to see the numbers dwindle, I think, because everybody doesn't want to spend six months in space.

"Some people will stay around because they want to be a part of the development of the next generation spacecraft and the next generation capability. Those are discussions that I need to have with the Astronaut Office.

"The other discussion that we all need to have, and this is one that needs to be had at among the inter-agencies and also among those who push commercial spaceflight, because you know I'm not stupid, and I know that while most of you idolize astronauts, there is a small contingent of people on the outside that really have a great disdain for astronauts. Because they feel because there is this elite astronaut corps that we have stopped others from being able to go into space. And so if they can just get rid of the elite astronaut corps, then everybody else can go fly. That's a discussion that we need to have.

"When we start using commercial capabilities to get people into low Earth orbit, does that mean that the Astronaut Office goes and says, 'I want to rent or I want to...', we're not going to buy, 'I want to rent a spacecraft to take a crew of six to the International Space Station? Or I want to rent a crew to go the International Space Station to do six months of work?' There is a distinct difference between that operational mode and that's the discussion that we need to have and we've already started having.

"And that is the discussion that I intended to have with people in the Astronaut Office. Because they are the experts.

"You know, they are probably some of you sitting out there that, you know, anybody can do what Peggy Whitson can do on the International Space Station given a week or two. I beg to differ. Peggy Whitson, who is the Chief of the Astronaut Office, has spent her life preparing for space exploration. She's lived on NEEMO under the water, she has lived on the International Space Station, she's commanded the International Space Station, she's flown on multiple spaceflights, she's trained in Russia. I contend that I can't go out here and pick 'Joe Schmuck' up off the street and send them to Johnson Space Center or here to the Kennedy Space Center for six weeks and they are going to be a Peggy Whitson. Ain't going to happen.

"So we need to have the discussion of what the future, the next generation of astronauts will be like. And our international partners have a lot to say about that, because they happen to like the elite astronaut corps. So we need to have the discussion of how important it is to have a career astronaut contingent as opposed to none, but you know, we'll do whatever the American public wants."

space4u
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posted 02-06-2010 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for space4u   Click Here to Email space4u     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great question Robert! You're about the only one that elicited some sort of an answer to their question.

Kel
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posted 02-06-2010 02:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kel   Click Here to Email Kel     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another question: since many astronauts are also currently "on loan" to NASA from various branches of the military, would they still be able to pursue employment with a private company while still on active duty in the military?

Michael Davis
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posted 02-06-2010 02:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Michael Davis   Click Here to Email Michael Davis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Interesting answer. I had not considered long duration flight versus a two week trip as a differentiator for staying in the Astronaut service or not. But it makes sense. I wonder how many of the Mercury thru Apollo astronauts would have had an interest in a six month stay in LEO.

I also wonder how many of the military pilots that joined just to have a shot at mission command will reconsider. As long as they launch with the Russians, they are probably not going to get their hand anywhere near a control stick or an abort handle. That's probably not what they signed-up for.

SpaceAholic
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posted 02-06-2010 03:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kel:
...would they still be able to pursue employment with a private company while still on active duty in the military?
Active duty members cannot be assigned under the cognizance of a contracting organization. They can support government activities in the role of liaison (in this capacity the military astronauts would continue to report to DOD/NASA and draw federal pay).

Jay Chladek
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posted 02-06-2010 11:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The way it has also been in the past is that a member of the military can also be assigned to work with a contractor. But again they would draw federal pay and not be employed by the company. The company would be their duty station in a sense. This happened during Apollo as astronauts would spend long periods with the contractors during equipment design and fabrication to provide their input. As I recall, Frank Borman spent a long period at North American to help with the hatch re-design after the Apollo 1 fire.

This wouldn't really be any different with a civilian astronaut getting a federal paycheck through NASA either. They can be assigned to work with a contractor once a contract is awarded, but they don't work FOR the contractor. If they want to pursue employment with that private company, they have to leave NASA due to a potential conflict of interest.

I recently had a discussion with Andy Thomas on a matter related to this. He (at last check) was working at NASA on the Altair lunar lander. As such, I asked him if he had any discussions with either Pam Melroy or Brian Duffey on Altair as both of them work for Lockheed now on various elements of Constellation out of the Houston offices. He said he hadn't had any discussions with them. Since the Altair contract wasn't assigned yet, he couldn't discuss anything about NASA's Altair work as that would give one potential contractor an unfair advantage over others.

As such, when an astronaut leaves the corps to become employed by a private firm or contractor, they no longer have access to certain proprietary information from their old employer (NASA and/or the DoD).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-22-2010 11:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the NASA FY2011 budget estimates:
NASA will enlist the National Research Council (NRC) to conduct an independent study of the activities funded within NASA's Human Space Flight Operations program. The study will focus on the role and size of the human spaceflight office in the post Space Shuttle retirement and Space Station assembly environment; the crew-related facility, aircraft and training requirements to support the astronaut corps' for the requirements of NASA's new human spaceflight program, and the more cost- effective means of meeting these requirements. Initiation of the study will commence as soon as possible, with the goal of being completed in time to inform the FY 2013 budget process.

WAWalsh
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posted 02-22-2010 04:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for WAWalsh   Click Here to Email WAWalsh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Admittedly, the very brief conversation yesterday did not give much of an opportunity for a discussion, but Charles Camarda did not immediately disagree that the budget decision will result in my suggestion that the astronaut corps would end up being reduced by 2/3.

Personally, I would not be surprised if 5 to 10 years from now, that there would not be an active astronaut corps at NASA. By then, if it is still in operation, the crew of the ISS will be a quasi-privatized group and it is possible that by the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, NASA will not have a single active astronaut.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-04-2010 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Watch has obtained a memo from the Astronaut Office providing their thoughts on commercial crew launch services. They do not reject the idea but stress NASA-involvement in passing along lessons learned.
The following paper provides recommendations for the transition to a commercial-crew vehicle to the ISS which leverages the experience gained in the operation of the Space Shuttle, the ISS, and in the design of Constellation.

Delta7
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posted 05-30-2010 09:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm curious about NASA's current plans for the Astronaut Office post-Shuttle/ pre-whatever. Surely NASA will be in a situation of having many more astronauts than current needs require with the number of astronauts it now has, and not enough for all of them to do.

Does NASA plan to reduce the size of it's astronaut corps purely by voluntary attrition, or is there a provision for forced cuts in staff? If so, what would be the criteria (length of service; number of missions flown)?

Will the branches of the military see less reason to "loan" their personnel to NASA and recall more back to active duty? The only available flight slots for the foreseeable future are Soyuz/ISS Expedition ones; the earliest unfilled and available start in 2013, and there will be only 4-5 per year until our as-yet-undetermined Shuttle successor is ready to fly, whenever that might be.

Presumably the Gulfstream II Shuttle Training Aircraft will be retired (or converted for other use), but what about the T-38s? With the inevitable attrition of the astronaut corps, plus an undetermined future role for pilot-astronauts, what will be the rationale for keeping them flight proficient, and how many airplanes will be required? I would expect at least some kind of reduction of the fleet size.

Any thoughts or scuttlebutt?

ambrous
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posted 09-02-2010 06:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ambrous     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There were Apollo era astronauts still flying to the mid-1980s. How long will the shuttle astronauts continue to fly after the shuttle is done? 10-15 years til 2025? Also who will be the last?

Editor's note: Threads merged.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 09-02-2010 08:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On talking with a couple of astronauts, it seems to depend on a few things:

Probably most important is how old they are. If they're in their 40s, with one, perhaps two flights under their belts - and if those two flights consist of both a long duration ISS mission as well as a short shuttle flight - the time for a career change is now. In 10 or 15 years they're going to be thinking of retirement.

If they've just completed a mission, they have to get back into rotation. That's 2015 at the earliest before they can expect to fly again. Some of them have waited 10 years or more to get a flight.

Do they have a family and have young children or do they want to start a family? Spending time in Star City may not be where they want to raise kids or see them grow up.

Coupled with that is, how much Russian do they know? In order to serve on ISS, they need to know the language, which is different than post-Apollo astronauts transitioning to Shuttle.

There have been a few who have said they're thinking about going to Star City; one said he's in it for the long haul, to serve his country and whatever happens, happens. But at the end of the day, away from the crowds, it's a decision which all their family members as well as the astronaut needs to think long and hard about.

issman1
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posted 09-15-2010 10:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The announcement of the STS-335/135 crew probably means the end of the road for Anna Fisher, Yvonne Cagle and many others listed active in the Astronaut Corps.

Editor's note: Threads merged.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 09-15-2010 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
By the time the TFNG had been announced, just 27 astronauts remained as active astronauts...

issman1
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posted 09-15-2010 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The way things are panning out for NASA's long-term future, many astronauts will be lucky to get multiple flights.

For instance, by the time Canada's Chris Hadfield takes command of the ISS in 2013 it will have been 12 years since his previous flight!

For recently flown US astronauts, like Randy Bresnik and Terry Virts, their best opportunity for another flight is probably as crewmembers on a commercial vehicle.

Delta7
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posted 09-15-2010 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would expect the pace of astronaut retirements to pick up at this point.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 09-15-2010 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Even more so now. Look at Bjarni Tryggvason; selected in '83, flew in '97, and selected in '98 as a NASA mission specialist but never flew again.

Delta7
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posted 09-15-2010 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Probably some will stay on to help with the development of whatever new course the program takes, even without the prospect of another flight. Kind of like some did between Apollo and the Shuttle.

issman1
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posted 09-15-2010 11:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Doesn't it also present a dilemma for Russian cosmonauts as well, with more and more Soyuz seats being allocated to foreign astronauts?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-14-2010 02:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Aviation Week: Astronaut Corps Shrinks As Shuttles Retire
With the final crews in training for NASA's last three space shuttle missions, the number of astronauts in the corps is down to 65 - a 25% drop since last year.

NASA plans to keep its roster of astronauts at 65 to support spaces station operations and other programs, including the development of the agency's Orion deep space capsule and planned commercial crew vehicles, said Jerry Ross, a seven-time shuttle veteran who heads the agency's Vehicle Integration Test Office, an engineering support team for the Astronaut Office.

The 65-member corps does not include nine astronaut-candidates selected last year who are still in training, Ross told AVIATION WEEK. Those newcomers, however, may not fully offset the number of astronauts like Ross who plan to leave NASA upon the shuttle program's completion next year.

Delta7
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posted 10-20-2010 12:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've noticed an increasing trend lately of military astronauts retiring from active duty and remaining on the job as civilians. Frick, Hobaugh, Walheim, Ferguson, Foreman, Johnson, Zamka, Drew, Ford, Garan, Good, Sturckow, Burbank, Coleman in the past year or two.

Byeman
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posted 10-20-2010 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Byeman   Click Here to Email Byeman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Chladek:
The way it has also been in the past is that a member of the military can also be assigned to work with a contractor.
This happens all the time. They are called contractor resident offices. It is not that the personnel are assigned to "work" with the contractor, they are assigned to represent the project office to the contractor. Instead of being at JSC and trying to interface with NAA via phone and letters, Borman just set up office at Downey.

Byeman
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posted 10-20-2010 01:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Byeman   Click Here to Email Byeman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delta7:
I've noticed an increasing trend lately of military astronauts retiring from active duty and remaining on the job as civilians.
That is so they can double dip - draw their military retirement pay while receiving civil servant pay vs just receiving their military pay. Has nothing to do with the current state of affairs of NASA.

kr4mula
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posted 10-21-2010 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Byeman:
That is so they can double dip - draw their military retirement pay while receiving civil servant pay vs just receiving their military pay. Has nothing to do with the current state of affairs of NASA.

I don't think this is the case. I seem to remember seeing in my civil service paperwork somewhere that the receipt of your military pension is suspended if you return to work as a civilian government employee. But a retired military person may very well make much more in an equivalent civilian slot and earn more torward a retirement package than if they stayed in the military or used their military retirement alone.

None of this applies, of course, to going to work for a private company, which either retired military or civilian employees may do and continue to receive their pensions.

Delta7
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posted 10-21-2010 11:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While this is nothing new, it just seems that the number of astronauts switching from military to civilian has increased significantly during the past year or two. Several in the past few months. It used to be that simultaneous retirement from the military AND the Astronaut Office was the norm. Just curious if the recent "rash" of shifts is due to something unique to the present time or not due to any particular rhyme or reason.

Delta7
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posted 10-21-2010 12:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Also I've noticed that the % of active astronauts who are also active military officers is significantly down from the past.

By my count, there are:

  • Navy: 10 active; 2 candidates;
  • Air Force: 6 active; 2 candidates;
  • Army: 4 active; 1 candidate;
  • Marine Corps: 2 active.
That's a total of 22 active and 5 candidates out of a total of about 90, or slightly less than 1/3. Is this an all-time low? Just curious, and wondering if this is an indication of the future trend with regards to the composition of the astronaut corps.

Byeman
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posted 10-21-2010 03:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Byeman   Click Here to Email Byeman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kr4mula:
I don't think this is the case.
It is the case. I work with many retired military. They never lose their military retirement. What happens is that they start with no gov't time as far as vacation and CS retirement.

kr4mula
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posted 10-22-2010 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Afetr chatting with a Personnel friend down the hall, it turns out we're both correct. Military retirees have the option of foregoing their military retirement during/after civil service employment and instead applying their military service to their CS time, and thus retire on civil service benefits alone, as I said. Or they can do as you say and receive their military retirement during/after civil service employment, but they start with zero time accrued for leave and retirement computation as a civil servant.
Cheers!

Byeman
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posted 10-22-2010 11:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Byeman   Click Here to Email Byeman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kr4mula:
Or they can do as you say and receive their military retirement during/after civil service employment, but they start with zero time accrued for leave and retirement computation as a civil servant.
I am a former military who got out after 9 years. I was able to buy 9 years of CS time by contributing 3% of what I earned in the military.

Byeman
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posted 10-22-2010 11:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Byeman   Click Here to Email Byeman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kr4mula:
Military retirees have the option of foregoing their military retirement during/after civil service employment and instead applying their military service to their CS time, and thus retire on civil service benefits alone, as I said.
The reason that they almost never forgo their military retirement is because it is 2.5% per year vs CS of 1.1%.

brianjbradley
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posted 01-06-2011 03:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for brianjbradley   Click Here to Email brianjbradley     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As indicated by many in the press and on space enthusiast message boards like this one, the retirement of a long-serving astronaut like Marsha Ivins is indicative that this season of change in human spaceflight is going to result in changes to the Astronaut Office ranks and particularly retirements of some of the big names we have become accustomed to.

What is the buzz out there for astronauts who may be moving on? I noticed in a recent article about Piers Sellers receiving the OBE that he is "set to return to NASA Goddard to resume his science pursuits." Surprised no one jumped on that. You'd think with a flight history of both EVA and robotics experience he would be in the ranks for a long duration increment.

Editor's note: Threads merged.

Rick Mulheirn
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posted 01-06-2011 04:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anybody have an idea where Scott Altman moved to when he left NASA last Fall?

brianjbradley
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From: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 01-06-2011 04:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for brianjbradley   Click Here to Email brianjbradley     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As per his NASA Bio, Altman joined "ASRC Research and Technology Solutions in Greenbelt, Maryland."

Editor's note: See the thread devoted to Altman's post-NASA career.

Rick Mulheirn
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Posts: 2458
From: England
Registered: Feb 2001

posted 01-06-2011 04:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Brian. I just spotted the info courtesy of Robert's post on Astro Bios. Thanks again Buddy!

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