Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Explorers & Workers
  Fred Haise and the lifting body program

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Fred Haise and the lifting body program
alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-06-2009 02:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I read somewhere that Fred Haise was briefly assigned to the lifting body program at Edwards and he flew the M2F1. Can anyone shed some light?

albatron
Member

Posts: 2103
From: Stuart, Florida, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 08-06-2009 07:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for albatron   Click Here to Email albatron     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
He did, and flew the R4D tow plane for the M2 F1 flights.

gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 08-07-2009 06:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
...and having sat next to him at the last ASF dinner, he is enthusiastic to discuss this program. "Wingless Flight" by R Dale Reed NASA SP 4220 covers some of his involvement.

albatron
Member

Posts: 2103
From: Stuart, Florida, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 08-07-2009 08:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for albatron   Click Here to Email albatron     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
He did this in prep for the ALT program of course. It is interesting how he considers his involvement in this and the ALT program as the pinnacle of his success, isn't it Paul?

Kind of like Neil Armstrong more proud of his X-15 time.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-07-2009 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had a chance to talk to Fred Haise last year at the ASF show but I had not realised he was involved in the lifting body program. I hope I get a chance to talk with him this year about it. I have always thought the lifting body series of aircraft were some of the more interesting research aircraft NASA and the Air Force developed.

Thanks for the tip on "Wingless Flight".

Bob M
Member

Posts: 1367
From: Atlanta-area, GA USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 08-07-2009 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A while back, several of us discussed exactly who flew the 1st Lifting Body, the M2-F1. Old records I had indicated that only seven pilots flew the M2-F1, however, accurate records indicate that there were actually ten M2-F1 pilots and one of them was Fred Haise. However, only 7 pilots flew actual unpowered glide flights, while the other three flew so-called ground tow flights. These ground towed flights involved having the M2-F1 remain tethered behind a souped-up Pontiac convertable at speeds up to 120 mph.

Haise, Joe Engle and James W. Wood flew tethered, car-towed ground flights, while the other 7 flew glide flights after being towed to release altitude by a Navy R4D/C-47/civil DC-3 aircraft.

Years ago, I had an M2-F3 cover autographed by the seven M2-F1 pilots who flew actual glide flights and here is that cover autographed by Yeager, Thompson, Dana, Peterson, Gentry, Mallick and Sorlie.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-07-2009 07:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow that is a great piece!!!

micropooz
Member

Posts: 1239
From: Washington, DC, USA
Registered: Apr 2003

posted 08-07-2009 08:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for micropooz   Click Here to Email micropooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Haise also flew chase for several X-15 missions in 1965.

328KF
Member

Posts: 829
From:
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-07-2009 08:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another book I highly recommend on this subject is "Flying Without Wings" by Milt Thompson and Curtis Peebles. It was published after Milt's passing in 1993 and is an excellent follow-on to his X-15 book "At the Edge of Space".

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-07-2009 09:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by micropooz:
Haise also flew chase for several X-15 missions in 1965.
Was Haise actually assigned to the X-15 Program? It was my understanding that if a test program needed a chase pilot they would often ask someone who was available for the flight but not actually assigned to the program.

micropooz
Member

Posts: 1239
From: Washington, DC, USA
Registered: Apr 2003

posted 08-08-2009 05:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for micropooz   Click Here to Email micropooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think the latter - I have never seen anything that said he was specifically assigned to the X-15 program.

albatron
Member

Posts: 2103
From: Stuart, Florida, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 08-08-2009 07:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for albatron   Click Here to Email albatron     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No Freddo was never assigned to the X-15 program. In many cases chase pilots were "grabbed" from somewhere else, depends on if they were short, who was available etc.

Al Crews flew many chases, and was grabbed to fly right seat on a B-52 for a drop! That was his only drop flight, and he was a fighter guy.

"Twig" Branch and Yeager were two others who flew onboard right seat for 1 drop only but that was a courtesy.

Also there were 4 designated chase pilots per flight, but a lot of others participated in chases as well and are not listed anywhere.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-08-2009 10:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was my understanding for X-15 missions, depending on the test parameters, there were usually four primary chase pilots and then a host of other chase aircraft might be required depending on the test. Maybe someone can shed some light, but because the X-15 was a multi-branch aircraft, the chase duties were often shared using NASA and Air Force aircraft and pilots, depending who was available for that particular flight.

Am I wrong in saying for most lifting body flights, as NASA was the prime test conductor, most chase flights were conducted by NASA aircraft and pilots?

I know the Air Force was also doing some heavy testing of the X-24, but any photos I have seen show NASA aircraft flying chase.

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 08-12-2009 08:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished reading R. Dale Reeds book "Wingless Flight The Lifting Body Story". What a great book. I learned a great deal about the lifting body program. Good read.

albatron
Member

Posts: 2103
From: Stuart, Florida, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 08-12-2009 09:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for albatron   Click Here to Email albatron     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
MOST of the X-15 missions had 4 chase aircraft/pilots. On occasion they had 3. Those were the primary assigned chase aircraft.

However, they would have others out there on occasion. Tony Landis can tell you far better than I.

For the listings of the primary chase pilots, you can find them in the back of Dennis Jenkins outstanding book (literally "the Bible" for the X-15) X-15 Extending the Frontiers of Flight.

Aztecdoug
Member

Posts: 1330
From: Huntington Beach
Registered: Feb 2000

posted 08-12-2009 09:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aztecdoug   Click Here to Email Aztecdoug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would like add Hypersonic by Jenkins and Landis to that list of essential X-15 books. The appendix is really, really good. Hypersonic was sort of a prelude to Extending the Frontiers of Flight, and it has a lot more pictures.

Some of the chase pilots, X-15 pilot combos are interesting. For example I believe Collins flew chase for Armstrong if my addled memory holds true.

Dale Reeds book The Lifting Body Story is a NASA publication. SP-4220. This is available somewhere in the bowels of NASA for purchase. This too has a great appendix.

I read somewhere once, I believe on the Dryden website, that the unofficial motto of the lifting Body Program was... Don't be Rescued from Outer Space -- Fly Back in Style.

All that test pilot stuff is just so cool and exotic. Once you memorize all the M-G-A info then you can dive into test pilots and programs and you will never be satiated. There is just so much depth to that story.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement