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  John Grunsfeld's post-NASA astronaut career

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Author Topic:   John Grunsfeld's post-NASA astronaut career
ilbasso
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Posts: 1494
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 05-21-2009 01:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
University of Colorado release
Hubble Repair Mission Astronaut John Grunsfeld Named to CU-Boulder Faculty

Astronaut John Grunsfeld, nearing the end of a successful NASA mission on board the space shuttle Atlantis to repair and refurbish the aging Hubble Space Telescope, has been named an adjoint professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Grunsfeld, who participated in three spacewalks during the mission -- including one to insert a $70 million instrument on the orbiting telescope designed by CU-Boulder known as the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph -- will join the university's astrophysical and planetary sciences department. Grunsfeld, who confirmed his acceptance of the CU faculty position in a space e-mail from Atlantis earlier this week, will conduct research and teach courses on manned space flight and the development and servicing of future space telescopes, according to CU-Boulder Professor Michael Shull.

Grunsfeld has now made eight spacewalks during his astronaut career, including three during the current Atlantis mission.

"John Grunsfeld is one of the finest space scientists in the nation and one of the premier astronauts to have flown on NASA space shuttles," said John Stocke of CU-Boulder's astrophysical and planetary sciences department. "We could not be more pleased to have him on board at the University of Colorado."

Grunsfeld has now participated in three NASA space shuttle missions to repair and upgrade Hubble, which was launched in 1990 and is widely considered one of NASA's greatest achievements. Grunsfeld will concentrate his research efforts at CU-Boulder on the development of the next-generation large optical and ultraviolet telescopes in space, the operations of science instruments in remote space environments and the development of a low-frequency radio telescope on the far side of the moon.

In addition to helping to install the COS on Hubble during the Atlantis mission, he also made extensive repairs on the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the orbiting telescope. Both COS and ACS were built by Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. of Boulder.

The telephone-booth-sized COS should help scientists better understand the "cosmic web" of material believed to permeate the universe, said CU-Boulder Professor James Green of the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, principal investigator for the instrument. COS will gather information from ultraviolet light emanating from distant objects, allowing scientists to look back several billion years and reconstruct the physical conditions and evolution of the early universe.

Grunsfeld joins former NASA astronaut Joe Tanner, who joined CU-Boulder's aerospace engineering sciences department as a senior lecturer in September 2008. Tanner has been at Johnson Space Center in Houston at the Mission Control Center helping to monitor Atlantis flight activities and advising the astronauts through the five spacewalks required to repair Hubble.

Grunsfeld received his bachelor's degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his doctorate from the University of Chicago. He began astronaut training in 1992, which led to five space shuttle flights. He served as chief scientist for NASA in 2003-04, the most senior science position at the space agency.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-04-2010 08:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Astronaut John Grunsfeld, Instrumental to Hubble Telescope Repair, Will Help Oversee its Science Operations

NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld, who participated in three space flights to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is leaving the agency to become the deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. The institute is the science operations center for Hubble and the James Webb Space Telescope, which is planned for launch in 2014.

"During the past 18 years, John has been a true asset to the agency," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, a former astronaut who flew on the STS-31 mission that deployed the Hubble. "Some have called him the chief Hubble repairman, but I call him a friend and wish him the best in his new endeavor."

In addition to Grunsfeld's flights to Hubble (STS-103 in Dec. 1999, STS-109 in March 2002, and STS-125 in May 2009), he also served on two other shuttle missions. He performed eight critical spacewalks and logged more than 835 hours in space.

During 2003 and 2004, he was NASA's Chief Scientist at the agency's headquarters in Washington. He helped develop the Vision for Space Exploration, which set NASA on the path for future exploration endeavors.

In accepting the institute position, Grunsfeld said, "This is an incredibly exciting opportunity for me to work at a focal point of top astronomers at the leading edge of scientific inquiry. The team at the Space Telescope Science Institute has a demonstrated record of meeting the high performance challenges of operating the Hubble Space Telescope and preparing for the James Webb Space Telescope. I look forward to working with this excellent team as we continue to explore the mysteries of the universe."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-04-2010 10:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space Telescope Science Institute release
Astronaut John Grunsfeld Appointed STScI Deputy Director

Dr. John M. Grunsfeld has been appointed Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md. effective January 4, 2010. He succeeds Dr. Michael Hauser, who stepped down in October. STScI is the science operations center for NASA's orbiting Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope planned to be launched in 2014.

In accepting the position, Grunsfeld said "This is an incredibly exciting opportunity for me to work at a focal point of top astronomers at the leading edge of scientific inquiry. The team at STScI has a demonstrated record of meeting the high performance challenges of operating the Hubble Space Telescope, and preparing for the James Webb Space Telescope. I look forward to working with this excellent team as we continue to explore the mysteries of the universe."

Born in Chicago, Grunsfeld received his Bachelor of Science degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980 and his Master of Science and doctor of philosophy degrees in physics from the University of Chicago in 1984 and 1988, respectively.

Grunsfeld held academic positions as visiting scientist at the University of Tokyo's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science from 1980-81; graduate research assistant at the University of Chicago from 1981-85; NASA Graduate Student Fellow at the University of Chicago from 1985-87; Grainger Postdoctoral Fellow in Experimental Physics at the University of Chicago from 1988-89; and senior research fellow at the California Institute of Technology from 1989-92.

Grunsfeld reported to NASA's Johnson Space Center in 1992 for a year of training and became qualified for flight selection as a mission specialist. A veteran of five space flights, including three missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope -- STS-103 in Dec. 1999, STS-109 in March 2002, and STS-125 in May 2009 -- he has logged over 835 hours in space, including nearly 60 hours of Extravehicular Activity during eight space walks. He served as the NASA Chief Scientist detailed to NASA Headquarters in 2003-2004, where he helped develop the President's Vision for Space Exploration.

His research has covered X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, high-energy cosmic ray studies, and development of new detectors and instrumentation. Grunsfeld has conducted observations of the far-ultraviolet spectra of faint astronomical objects and the polarization of ultraviolet light coming from stars and distant galaxies.

"We are absolutely delighted that he has accepted the position," said STScI Director, Dr. Matt Mountain. "John brings to us a wealth of expertise in the areas of space exploration concepts and technologies for use beyond low-earth orbit. He will be invaluable in our continued efforts to conduct world-class science with state-of-the-art observatories and instrumentation."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-21-2011 06:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nature reports that John Grunsfeld is set to return to NASA as its associate administrator for the science mission directorate.
John Grunsfeld, an astrophysicist and astronaut who fixed the Hubble Space Telescope, has been chosen to lead NASA’s science mission directorate, according to several sources with knowledge of the selection.

Grunsfeld is currently deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, which operates Hubble. He would replace Ed Weiler, who resigned his post as NASA associate administrator in September.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-19-2011 11:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Physicist And Former Astronaut John Grunsfeld To Head NASA Science Directorate

NASA has named physicist and former astronaut John Grunsfeld as the new associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at the agency's headquarters in Washington. Grunsfeld will take the reins of the office effective Jan. 4, 2012. He succeeds Ed Weiler, who retired from NASA on Sept. 30.

Grunsfeld currently serves as the deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, which manages the science program for the Hubble Space Telescope and is a partner in the forthcoming James Webb Space Telescope. His background includes research in high energy astrophysics, cosmic ray physics and in the emerging field of exoplanet studies with specific interest in future astronomical instrumentation.

A veteran of five space shuttle flights, Grunsfeld visited Hubble three times as an astronaut, performing a total of eight spacewalks to service and upgrade the observatory.

"John's understanding of the critical connection between scientific research and the human exploration of space makes him an ideal choice for this job," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. "I look forward to working with him to take the agency's science programs to even greater heights and make more of the ground-breaking discoveries about Earth and our universe for which NASA is known."

Grunsfeld graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980 with a bachelor's degree in physics. Returning to his native Chicago, he earned a master's degree and, in 1988, a doctorate in physics from the University of Chicago using a cosmic ray experiment on space shuttle Challenger for his doctoral thesis. From Chicago, he joined the faculty of the California Institute of Technology as a Senior Research Fellow in Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy.

Grunsfeld joined NASA's Astronaut Office in 1992. He logged over 58 days in space on five shuttle missions, including 58 hours and 30 minutes of spacewalk time. He first flew to space aboard Endeavour in March 1995 on a mission that studied the far ultraviolet spectra of faint astronomical objects using the Astro Observatory. His second flight was aboard Atlantis in January 1997. The mission docked with the Russian space station Mir and exchanged U.S. astronauts living aboard the outpost. Grunsfeld then flew three shuttle missions - aboard Discovery in December 1999, Columbia in March 2002 and Atlantis in May 2009 -- that successfully serviced and upgraded the Hubble Space Telescope. He served as the payload commander on the 2002 mission and lead spacewalker in charge of Hubble activities on the 2009 flight. In 2004 and 2005, he served as the commander and science officer on the backup crew for Expedition 13 to the International Space Station.

"It is an honor and a privilege to be offered the opportunity to lead NASA's Science Mission Directorate during this exciting time in the agency's history," Grunsfeld said. "Science at NASA is all about exploring the endless frontier of the Earth and space. I look forward to working with the NASA team to help enable new discoveries in our quest to understand our home planet and unravel the mysteries of the universe."

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