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Author Topic:   Space shuttle astronaut statistics
Delta7
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posted 02-25-2010 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by moorouge:
OK - but what about the other orbiters?
Shannon Lucid flew 4 times on Atlantis: STS-34, STS-43, STS-76 (up), and STS-79 (down).

NavySpaceFan
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posted 02-25-2010 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
Is Wilson the only astronaut whose second mission has a lower STS number than the first?
Still looking for more examples, but on a related note, the mission that took Sandra Magnus to the ISS (STS-126) had a higher number than the one that took her home (STS-119).

Delta7
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posted 02-25-2010 10:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thomas Reiter went up on STS-121 and down on STS-116.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 02-25-2010 10:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah, okay. Does anyone know why the STS-11 (41B) crew had lithos that were originally printed up as being manifested on Columbia? Was it planned that post-Spacelab modifications would be complete in time for that flight?

Mike Isbell
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posted 02-25-2010 02:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Isbell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by OV-105:
I think Steve Hawley did that on STS-41D and STS-61C.

As I recall, STS-61C did not experience an RSLS abort.

OV-105
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posted 02-25-2010 06:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Isbell:
As I recall, STS-61C did not experience an RSLS abort.

It had one on December 19,1985 clock stopped at T-14 secounds. Then on January 6, 1986 at T-31 secounds. So he is the only with three for two flights. He also got another one on STS-93 on July 20,1999 at T-7 secounds.

Greggy_D
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posted 02-25-2010 09:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greggy_D   Click Here to Email Greggy_D     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I thought the main engines had to fire first before a RSLS abort.

webhamster
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posted 02-26-2010 07:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for webhamster   Click Here to Email webhamster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Greggy_D:
I thought the main engines had to fire first before a RSLS abort.

I believe you are correct. My understanding is that anything between T-31 and T-6.6 is technically a "cut-off" and not an abort as engines need to be firing in order to "abort". But when you get that close to flying I think the correct terminology could really just be a case of splitting hairs.

moorouge
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posted 03-01-2010 01:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We seem to have stalled on some statistics. Who has flown Endeavour the most times? Which orbiter has had the most launch day scrubs, i.e. with crew strapped in ready to go? Which orbiter has gone on time the most times?

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 03-01-2010 05:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd be curious to know if there's been a person who has been assigned to more than two canceled missions. I'll accept an announcement that such-and-such a person has been assigned to a mission as evidence of how "definite" the flight was.

Delta7
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posted 03-01-2010 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by moorouge:
We seem to have stalled on some statistics. Who has flown Endeavour the most times?

Dominic Gorie has flown Endeavour 3 times.

OV-105
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posted 03-01-2010 07:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
I'd be curious to know if there's been a person who has been assigned to more than two canceled missions.
I think it would be a whole NASA crew that did end up flying STS-51D. They were set to fly in August of 1984 on Discovery's second flight STS-41F and then within a week with STS-51E.

ASCAN1984
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posted 03-02-2010 03:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ASCAN1984   Click Here to Email ASCAN1984     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Who is the person with the shortest period from selection as an astronaut to a flight?

moorouge
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posted 03-02-2010 07:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Shortest time between selection and flight - would have thought Senator Garn or John Glenn for his shuttle flight must be candidates.

webhamster
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posted 03-02-2010 08:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for webhamster   Click Here to Email webhamster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ASCAN1984:
Who is the person with the shortest period from selection as an astronaut to a flight?

I believe that would likely be Jerry Linenger. He reported for training in August 1992 and flew on STS-64 in September 1994 to get him spaceflight qualified for a Mir mission. That's almost exactly 2 years from start of basic training to launch.

Although some of the payload specialists may have had a shorter road to travel.

Delta7
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posted 03-02-2010 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It depends on if you consider the time from selection as an astronaut, or time from reporting for duty as an astronaut. Both Jerry Linenger and Susan Still-Kilrain had two years and five months for the former, two years and one month for the latter. Alan Shepard had two years and one month from the selection of the Original 7 to the launch of MR-3.

Delta7
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posted 03-02-2010 09:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Of course, at the other end of the spectrum is the 19-year wait for Don Lind. That's longer than the average astronaut career, and a record I doubt will ever be broken.

To put it in perspective, when Lind was selected as an astronaut LBJ was President and the Vietnam conflict was just gearing up. When he finally flew on STS 51-B, Reagan was in his second term, and anyone one born the year he was selected was old enough to serve in the military or attend college.

moorouge
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posted 03-02-2010 03:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delta7:
It depends on if you consider the time from selection as an astronaut, or time from reporting for duty as an astronaut.
So where does this leave Senator Garn and John Glenn? Surely they were shorter than those you quote. Or don't you consider them to be proper astronauts?

Delta7
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posted 03-02-2010 06:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by moorouge:
So where does this leave Senator Garn and John Glenn? Surely they were shorter than those you quote. Or don't you consider them to be proper astronauts?

Well, in this context I assume we're talking about the shortest time from selection by NASA as a full-time professional astronaut, completing the basic training program, completing mission-specific training, and being launched into space. Garn, Glenn (as a Payload Specialist), and others were selected under specific circumstances, and their training consisted more of "Here's how the toilet flushes" and "Whatever you do, don't touch that." As such, it's not an accurate match-up, again in the context of the original question as I understand it. And yes, they are "astronauts" in the sense of what they accomplished and experienced after launch, but not necessarily leading up to it.

moorouge
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posted 03-03-2010 02:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ASCAN1984:
Who is the person with the shortest period from selection as an astronaut to a flight?
Just in passing - the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, was selected as an astronaut in February 1962 and made her only flight in June 1963. This is just 16 months to the day.

Paul23
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posted 03-03-2010 05:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul23   Click Here to Email Paul23     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This isn't strictly a shuttle statistic related question but I'm not sure where else it fits. I also think I've seen this answered somewhere else but I can't find it, anywhere here is the question, which astronaut has the most number of confirmed aviation combat 'kills'?

webhamster
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posted 03-03-2010 07:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for webhamster   Click Here to Email webhamster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another one I just realized. I believe Karol Bobko is the only astronaut to fly on the maiden flights of two orbiters (Challenger and Atlantis).

astro-nut
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posted 03-04-2010 12:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for astro-nut   Click Here to Email astro-nut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just some more statistics, astronauts Tammy Jernigan, Jim Halsell, Don Thomas and Rick Linnehan have flowm on Shuttle Columbia the most times with three flights a piece.

Robert Crippen holds the record for flying Shuttle Challenger three times.

Astronauts Mike Coats, Steve Hawley, Mike Foale, C. Brown, Steve Robinson have flown on Shuttle Discovery three times and you could also include Jim Voss, Susan Helms. Steve Lindsey, and Stephanie Wilson will have three flights on Discovery later this year.

Astronaut Jerry Ross holds the record for five flights on Shuttle Atlantis and

Astronauts Dominic Gorie and Dan Bursch have flown on Endeavour three times as well.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 03-09-2010 11:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Quick question: Although women had trained as alternate payload specialists, was the first flight of a female non-NASA astronaut Christa McAuliffe?

webhamster
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posted 03-10-2010 10:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for webhamster   Click Here to Email webhamster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
...was the first flight of a female non-NASA astronaut Christa McAuliffe?
By non-NASA do you mean "non-professional" astronauts on the shuttle? In which case the answer would be yes. Mary Johnston was a backup Payload Specialist for STS-51-B.

RMH
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posted 03-18-2010 06:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for RMH   Click Here to Email RMH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can anyone share an alphabetical list of the 353 shuttle fliers with me?

cspg
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posted 03-19-2010 01:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just did. But I have "only" 349 shuttle fliers.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-19-2010 05:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is an alphabetical list of all 353 astronauts who have or will have launched on the shuttle through STS-134.

The list also notes at the bottom the two who only landed on the orbiter, bringing the total count of shuttle fliers to 355.

cspg
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posted 03-19-2010 09:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Your list is confusing.

As of STS-130, I have 349 fliers including the two who landed only.

With the upcoming four missions, the total goes to 354 (Dutton, Metcalf, Yamakazi, Barratt and Vittori).

From your list:

  • Chr├ętien is mispelled.
  • Currie and Sherlock are the same person!
  • I've seen 1 Smith, I have two: Michael and Steven.
  • Why is Solovyev treated diffently (he only went up) than Gidkenko and Strekalov? Solovyev is included in your alphabetical list.
  • You have 3 Williams, I have 4: Donald, Daffyd, Jeffrey and Sunita.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-19-2010 10:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for catching the errors, however my list (now updated) is still 353 long.

I corrected the Chr├ętien misspelling, removed Sherlock (left Currie), added the second Smith and fourth Williams. I also discovered I had Kopra listed twice.

Solovyev is included because the list is meant to represent all those who launched on the shuttle (therefore also including the STS-51L first time fliers).

The 353-count is already represented by the earlier list I posted, organized by first flight, which was based on a separate set of data (Spacefacts.de).

webhamster
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posted 03-19-2010 10:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for webhamster   Click Here to Email webhamster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
With the upcoming four missions, the total goes to 354 (Dutton, Metcalf, Yamakazi, Barratt and Vittori).

I think you're missing Michael Fincke here who has done two tours on the ISS but will be a shuttle first-timer on STS-134. With that addition you would also come up to 355 and match Robert's total.

cspg
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posted 03-19-2010 10:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So I have one too many or you're missing one. I hate statistics. I hate math.

cspg
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posted 03-20-2010 01:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by webhamster:
I think you're missing Michael Fincke here who has done two tours on the ISS but will be a shuttle first-timer on STS-134. With that addition you would also come up to 355 and match Robert's total.

You're absolutely correct. Fincke was "responsible" for the discrepancy. Robert's list is correct and the total number is indeed 355, at the end of the shuttle program, providing nothing goes wrong. My list is also correct: 349 people flew on the shuttle as of March 20, 2010.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 03-20-2010 10:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Either way, I have a long way to go in getting a "complete" Space Shuttle: 20 Years signed...

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 09-01-2010 03:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just a few more things of note:

Assuming the flight schedule remains the same, and there is no STS-135, TJ Creamer and Shannon Walker are the only two U.S. astronauts chosen during the shuttle era (Groups 8 through 19) to make their first flight not on the shuttle, but on the Soyuz.

Creamer's classmate, Marcos Pontes, also holds that distinction but as a Brazilian astronaut.

Haise is the only astronaut to have flown the shuttle, but not to orbit.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-01-2010 03:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
...only two U.S. astronauts chosen during the shuttle era (Groups 8 through 19) to make their first flight not on the shuttle, but on the Soyuz.
As written, Mike Fincke also fits into this category.

Assuming neither is assigned to a possible STS-135 (an impossibility for Walker, who is currently in space), Walker's and Creamer's record will be as the only astronauts selected during the shuttle era (Groups 8 through 19) to fly in space but not fly on the shuttle.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-11-2010 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
355 people flew on the space shuttle (Gennadi Strekalov and Yuri Gidzenko never launched on an orbiter, but landed on one);
The NASA Authorization Act of 2010 (as being signed by President Obama today) includes a section on the "Sense of Congress on the Space Shuttle Program," wherein this statement appears:
The Space Shuttle has carried more than 355 people from 16 nations into space.
Even taking the possible addition of STS-135 into account, the statement still reads wrong; the count is 355, not "more than."

Paul78zephyr
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posted 09-12-2011 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul78zephyr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Who was the oldest astronaut to command a space shuttle? Was it Vance Brand on STS-35?

Editor's note: Threads merged.

Delta7
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posted 09-12-2011 09:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Paul78zephyr:
Was it Vance Brand on STS-35?
Yes.

space4u
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posted 10-04-2011 03:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for space4u   Click Here to Email space4u     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From prior discussion on collectSPACE and posted astronaut lists, it appears that 355 people flew on the shuttle. It also looks like there were 49 women who flew on the shuttle based on those lists. Can anyone verify the number of women? (note: I'm including Christa McAuliffe)


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