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  What have astronauts told you?

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Author Topic:   What have astronauts told you?
ASCAN1984
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From: County Down, Nothern Ireland
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posted 07-05-2007 08:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ASCAN1984   Click Here to Email ASCAN1984     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was just wondering when you wrote to astronauts or saw them in person what information did they tell you?

Gareth

garymilgrom
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posted 07-05-2007 08:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Waiting for the launch of STS-116 we were entertained by Bob Crippen and another astronaut whose name I have forgotten. However this guy told the following story about "heroes" of the space program.

He talks about life aboard the Shuttle. Imagine 7 people living in the space of a minivan for about a week. They eat, burp, expel gas and sometimes get sick like anyone might on their vacation. They have all their soiled clothing, leftover food and sanitation items stowed on board. He said the people who open the hatch after landing are the REAL heroes of the space program because they have to deal with the odours in the vehicle!

derek
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posted 07-17-2007 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for derek   Click Here to Email derek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I asked Jim Irwin how many parachute jumps he'd made-assuming that would've been part of his USAF training-as I'd just done a few;he replied he'd never done one! Mitchell told me that the lunar surface beneath his feet felt like talcum powder rather than damp beach sand-as I'd thought- Helen Sharman said she'd brought her Swiss Army knife back from Mir to keep,and Burt Rutan told me Mike Melvill was too busy to look for stars during his flight.

randy
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posted 07-17-2007 08:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for randy   Click Here to Email randy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had the privelege of talking to the late, great Wally Schirra and asking him who's idea were the cue cards used on Apollo 7. He told me they were Bill Dana's idea.

Last month I got to talk to Don Lind when he was here in town. I had a copy of the flight directors log that I got as part of the gift set "Apollo 11- Artifacts from the first Lunar Landing". I noticed his name was mentioned in the log book having to do with the surface activities. I showed it to him and asked if he remembered doing these things. He smiled at me and said that he knew more about the surface activities than most anybody else, except Neil and Buzz and continued telling me about what they did. He planned the activity timeline and helped develop most of the ALSEP experiments.

I had a great time with both men.

Randy

ASCAN1984
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posted 07-18-2007 07:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ASCAN1984   Click Here to Email ASCAN1984     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
All of the below are from letters/notes I got from requests.

Piers sellers told me that half of his family were from northern Ireland where I am from. It was the first note I ever got from an astronaut.

Barbara Morgan told me that she appreciated my support and she told me to keep reaching for my goals. She is a really star (excuse the pun).

Winston Scott told me that he was glad I enjoyed his book.

Piers sllers told me that some of his family wrre from only two hours or so away from where I live.

Janice voss told me they flew John Herrigntons wings as a gift for him as he was there support crew member.

Mike Melville told me that Brian Binnie and Pete Seibold would probably be choosen as the pilots for Spaceship 2 and that he would probably be retired by then.

Rex Waleim told me that the bag you see in a lot of his STS 110 EVA photos is to keep his torque wrench warm.

Bill Readdy told me that STS 79 his final mission seems like a lifetime ago.

Megan McArthur told me that her 2000 "bugs" ascan class were named after the year 2000 computer bug.

Jerry Ross told me that his interest in Geniology has traced his ancestors back to northern ireland and that he visited some three years ago.

Probably not as exciting but so cool to get letters from astronauts.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 07-18-2007 10:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd have to dig out copies of my interviews and profiles, but off the top of my head:

Pete Aldridge somewhat surprised someone would want his autograph, saying he hadn't flown, but signing anyway, adding "STS-62A".

Cady Coleman looking puzzled at the litho I had. "They're already signed," she said. "Yeah, but they're autopens." "Oh. Okay," she said, re-signing them.

Not having enough time to talk to Rick Hauck about his Shuttle-Centaur flight, other than yes, his crew did train extensively for that mission.

Rick Searfoss saying he wanted to do a fourth flight, but decided to put his family first.

Leland Melvin noted how prepared I was, with both a litho and my book for him to sign. Also surprised was Greg Olsen and the staff of the school in which he appeared at.

Secondhand, I heard that both Searfoss and Dick Gordon were wondering what they were doing at a Star Trek convention; I remember them appearing at one held by Slanted Fedora in Philadelphia.

MCroft04
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posted 07-18-2007 10:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I asked both Alan Bean and Gene Cernan the following question (at different times). You are one of four men to perform both a lunar EVA and orbital EVA (for lack of a better term). Can you compare and contrast the 2? Below are their paraphrsaed responses.

Gene said that because once you leave the influence of the earth, your fanny is on the line, and thus his lunar EVA was by far the most spectacular. This is boiled down from about a 5 minute response.

Alan had a different take. He said the lunar EVA's were so rehearsed that once he stepped onto the lunar surface it was like old hat. But when he climbed out of the spacecraft on his Skylab mission, he was overwhelmed because it was all new and unexpected; it had not been rehearsed as the lunar EVA's had.

Obviously Buzz Aldrin and Pete Conrad are the other 2 to hold this distinction. I guess you could include Dave Scott, but his Apollo 9 EVA was only a stand-up. I wonder how Buzz and Pete would answer?

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 07-22-2007 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Still have to find my binder, but managed to track down an article I did on an Explorers Club dinner in March 2001 in which Dan Goldin was one of the guests.

I had him sign the cover of a NASA booklet; he did so, then said, "Get rid of the worm," circling the logo that was on the cover.

A direct quote (and keep in mind this was before Columbia STS-107): "On the space frontier, you cannot guarantee success. If you want success, and you want to guarantee there won't be failures, stay on the ground."

While the figures Goldin gave are not in the article, he gave increasing chances of dying in air and space related accidents, starting with (I think) dying in an airplane crash, dying in a fighter aircraft, and then dying on the shuttle. The statement I remember was that "The chances of a person dying on the shuttle is 1 in 250 - meaning that of 250 astronauts who board it, one won't come back."

As I said, not an exact quote. But what struck me about that part of his speech was not how stark it was, but of his delivery; it was so compelling (to me, anyway). I remember thinking, "Despite the 1 in 250, I'd still fly on the shuttle."

MCroft04
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posted 07-22-2007 09:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hart Sastrowardoyo:
The chances of a person dying on the shuttle is 1 in 250 - meaning that of 250 astronauts who board it, one won't come back.
I would think that 1 in 250 means that regardless of the number of astronauts on a shuttle, 1 in 250 flights are at risk of catstophic failure. Although I could be wrong, but would be very surprised if Goldin really meant 1 in 250 astronauts can be expected to be a casualty on the shuttle; seems very high.

Interestingly enough, I've read several times where people try to use the Challenger and Columbia disasters as indicative of the risk of flying on the shuttle; 2 in 100+ flights can be expected to fail. I'm not sure that 100+ flights, given the complexity of the shuttle, are enough flights to statistically assess the risk. Any math majors out there?

mjanovec
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posted 07-23-2007 01:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04:
Interestingly enough, I've read several times where people try to use the Challenger and Columbia disasters as indicative of the risk of flying on the shuttle; 2 in 100+ flights can be expected to fail. I'm not sure that 100+ flights, given the complexity of the shuttle, are enough flights to statistically assess the risk. Any math majors out there?

The two accidents might not be statistically indicative of the future rate of accidents. But they are historic reality. The Shuttle could theoretically fly another 400 times without an accident. Then again, God forbid, the very next flight could end in tragedy. Such is the nature of spaceflight.

One can calculate the odds of failure and fly based on that. But I think one also cannot ignore historic reality either. Right now, it would appear the odds, based on actual flight experience, are that slightly more than 1 in 100 flights will end in failure. To me, this number just sounds more convincing than 1 in 250, because it's backed up be actual data. And while the shuttle doesn't have the lengthy service record of, say, a 747 in which to predict a more accurate failure rate, it does have significantly more historic data than, say, the Saturn V.

Granted, one would hope the odds of success increase as we learn more from each flight (and each disaster). But how many more things are waiting in the wings to "bite" us when we least expect it?

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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From: Toms River, NJ,USA
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posted 07-25-2007 09:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Found my binder!

In addition to photos, I also collect letters with some interesting content.

From Palmer Bailey, Terra Geode PS candidate, dated March 1996 (I purchased this): "I suspect that my signature will be of little value to you now. People want autographs of those who fly space ships, not of those who drive dog sleds."

Also purchased, from Ken Bechis, Starlab PS candidate, dated September 1990: "I was selected in August 1987 for Starlab; the application and screening process ran from April-July 1987. NASA flight crews are typially not named until much closer to launch date. Other Mission Specialists are picked ~17 months before launch, and Commander and Pilot picked about 9-10 months before launch.

"Our flight has suffered numerous delays, but has never gotten closer than 18 months from launch. These continued delays, plus NASA's inability over the summer to achieve any shuttle launches, is causing Starlab's sponsors great concern. A move is afoot to 'fire' NASA and convert Starlab to a 12-month free-flyer launched on an expendable (e.g. Titan III). My role would then obviously involve science and mission operations support... from the ground!"

Also purchased, also about Starlab, dated August 1991, from Dennis Boesen: "You may remember that in September and October, 1990, the U.S. Congrss and the President had to make some difficult decisions with respect to the national budget. ... When these budget decisions were finally applied to specific programs, the Starlab mission was canceled. Part of the concern with Starlab was that it had grown very complex for the few days available in a Shuttle mission."

Jay Buckey, from an interview and presentation, on the cost of the U.S. space program: "If we ask people, 'Should we spend 0.8 percent of the federal budget on NASA?' they'll say 'That sounds about right.' Ask them the equivalent, 'Should we spend $15 billion' and they'll say that's too expensive."

As well, "It's clear people are fascinated by the space program, but it doesn't meet an immediate need. The problem is getting that interest into a tangible nuts and bolts program."

Scott Carpenter, interview and presentation, on flying after Deke Slayton was grounded.

"Deke was the only flight scheduled after John's. I did a lot of recent, intensive work with John's capsule, and when Deke got bumped, I was slated to fill in. Wally, who was the backup, had not as much experience.

"It was tough on me. I didn't want to see Deke lose his flight. And I didn't want to see Wally hurt from not flying."

Also: "I turned down an opportunity for a Gemini flight to go into the Navy's Sealab program. I was asked if I was interested in another flight, but I was tired of spending so much time away from my family. Then Chris Kraft weighed in and denied me a flight.

"My choice denied me an Apollo flight and a chance for a lunar landing.

"I don't like to make a choice between which I liked better, Mercury or Sealab. It was a crucial decision to go into Sealab, and a staggering loss at giving up an opportunity to land on the moon.

"I'm comforted by the thought that instead of a lost opportunity, I had the chance to instead work with some of the unsung heroes of Sealab."

Bob Cenker, from an interview and presentation: "I was closest to Christa McAuliffe (of the 51L crew) as we were both payload specialists. She wanted to know what it was like to be in space. We were going to exchange photos when she got back.

As well, "I would like to see spaceflight be a ticket that everyone can afford. Gravity is such a drag. I'd move in space tomorrow with my wife and kids. Everyone should see what it's like - it's unbelievable."

Brian Duffy, from an interview: "I was a typical third-grade kid with a big imagination (when Alan Shepard flew.) I watched in on a black-and-white television, sitting on the floor of my house, and I thought, 'How cool would that be?' "

Duffy, on the STS-92 mission, noticed on ISS all the patches from previous shuttle missions. "Nobody told me we were supposed to bring a patch! Koichi Wakata said, 'Go get the one off you (launch and entry) suit.' So that's the patch off my suit. So when I came back from the flight I didn't have a patch on my suit. I left it on the station."

Jake Garn, from an interview and presentation: "Me think about becoming an astronaut? It was simply not possible. I was 25 when Sputnik flew, and married with two kids. I knew I always wanted to be a pilot, but how does one become an astronaut?"

On the switch from 51E to 51D: "Charlie's EOS experiments were already installed on Discovery, which is why we lost Baudry as part of the crew. Charlie's a great guy, but we were disappointed in the switch because we didn't get to eat French food," he joked.

Fred Haise, at a presentation, said he had been training for Apollo 19 with Carr, who would have been LMP, and Pogue, the CMP, when it was canceled.

Rick Hieb, from an interview and presentation, on leaving after three flights: "I was too tall for Soyuz, the Russian mainstay on getting to and from space, so I couldn't go to Mir, although I would have loved to."

In addition, "The kids were getting bigger and the reasons to fly were getting smaller. I was 39, and I was young enough to go to industry and learn."

Marsha Ivins, in response to whether she was training for a sixth flight: "I'm done now, much to my mother's relief."

note from Jerry Linenger (purchased): "(I) became an astronaut to share in, to help advance, America's future. Great adventure to explore - to help us think of the world as 'our one planet' - were we all have to share and cooperate" (The note is also inscribed with STS 64, before his Mir mission.)

Mike Melvill, from a presentation made soon after his Space Ship One flight, said if he had not activated the backup system for the pitch trim control system, "there would have been no chance to recover. I would have spun like a top on re-entry, and I would have been dead."

Lastly, not from an astronaut, but from a class that Leland Melvin visited. He tried to bring across the concept of weightlessness to sixth-graders, and asked them, "What do you feel when the roller coaster gets to the top?"

The majority answer: "Sick."

NavySpaceFan
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posted 08-14-2007 12:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
John Young and Charlie Duke: Discussed the Navy's issueing of Command at Sea pins for Naval Astronauts commanding shuttle or ISS missions. Also thanks for the ship's coins (USS JOHN F. Kennedy) I passed them.

Jim Lovell: Thanks for my service in the Navy and, from me, signing my copy of Lost Moon.

Dr. Bonnie Dunbar: Welcoming her aboard USS John F. Kennedy (her brother-in-law was a former CO who retired on board), thanks for signing a shuttle mission book, discussions of the DISCOVERY/Hal parallel between life and art, and differences between orbiters (she felt COLUMBIA rode better due to the orbiter's extra weight).

COL John Blaha: During the lunch portion of the ATX, discussed his training at Star City and the cultural differece he faced, and flying at Mach 25!

CAPT Winston Scott: Which aircraft he liked better (Sea Sprite helicopters or F-14s?) and mutual experiences on board JFK.

Jay Chladek
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posted 08-14-2007 06:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've learned a few things.

I met Scott Carpenter at a special dinner a little over a year ago and had a copy of his book on hand (I was the only one who had it). He walked up and said "That is a nice piece of literature in your collection." with a smile on his face. He also mentioned that it was Kris' choice to write the book in third person (BTW Kris, if you read this, I liked the style it was written in and told Scott that).

I exchanged emails with Mike Mullane after I read his book and mentioned my enjoyment of it might have been enhanced by being on pain killers from a kidney stone I was suffering from. So his response was a rather silly "I may have to tell the editors to advertise the book as being great for kidney stones!" When I met him a few months later to get the book signed, I asked him if the book was a good one for somebody to read while suffering from kidney stones and he remembered our email.

Rex Walheim was helpful at KSC while I was collecting information for a Clayton Anderson article I was writing, specifically about how the Penguins got their name. He went on to describe the campaign they staged which rivaled an election campaign (T-Shirts, posters, buttons, you name it) in order to make sure their name was the Penguins and not some other flightless bird with a less then flattering name.

Julie Payette mouthed the words "Superman?" to me from across the press room as I was wearing a Superman T-Shirt during STS-121 RSS rollback day (I was waiting for my lost luggage to get delivered to my hotel at that point, hence the shirt).

I also learned that running into Frank Borman unannounced can make my jaw hit the floor. We had a chance meeting at an airshow, but I wasn't able to really answer a question as somebody else chimed in at that point going "Hey Frank Borman... I've always wanted to meet you... blah blah blah". So I kept my space, said it was nice to meet him (while not making a fool out of myself) shook his hand and he let me shoot a picture of him before he went back to his P-51. When I recognized him, he was discussing an engine problem on a P-63 King Cobra with the CAF pilot of that aircraft. So I said "THE Frank Borman?" to which the CAF pilot replied "Come on, how many Frank Bormans are there?" and Frank chuckled at that.

KC Stoever
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posted 08-14-2007 10:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KC Stoever   Click Here to Email KC Stoever     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hart,

I well remember your interview with Carpenter, particularly this part:

"I turned down an opportunity for a Gemini flight to go into the Navy's Sealab program. I was asked if I was interested in another flight, but I was tired of spending so much time away from my family. Then Chris Kraft weighed in and denied me a flight. (emphasis supplied)

"My choice denied me an Apollo flight and a chance for a lunar landing."

This is incorrect, with respect to a great man, my father.

Chris Kraft may have wanted to prevent Scott Carpenter from flying again, for personal and vindictive reasons well and fictionally documented in his memoir. But Carpenter sustained a medically grounding injury in mid-July 1964, while training for Sealab 1. It was this grounding injury and not Chris Kraft's disapprobation that ended Carpenter's spaceflight career.

If anyone has documentation to the contrary, please speak up.

Kris

kr4mula
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posted 08-15-2007 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I asked Neil Armstrong what was his favorite airplane/spacecraft/whatever to fly. His immediate answer? The F8F Bearcat. Better the the P/F-51 at Edwards? Much better. Better than the X-15? Certainly. He explained that the wealth of power and maneuverability meant you could make it do whatever you wanted as a pilot. Too bad he ended up flying some real dogs of the early straight-wing jet era in Korea.

Cheers,

Kevin

SpaceCat
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posted 08-15-2007 05:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceCat     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
First words from the first astronaut I ever met (and the only astro I ever met "on duty"), Pete Conrad when he visited a little Skylab systems prototype lab at KSC where I was working- summer of 1971:

"I hope you m***** f****** know what you're doing- I gotta ride this thing!"

Of course he was grinning that famous gap-tooth smile the whole time - walked around, asked about our work, shook hands, swapped stories and made all us lowly wire-jockeys feel very special!

dss65
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posted 08-15-2007 09:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dss65   Click Here to Email dss65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great story, SpaceCat! I'm sure that's a memory that will never dim.

------------------
Don

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 08-16-2007 02:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KC Stoever:
This is incorrect, with respect to a great man, my father.
Kris -

No disrespect intended. The article I did was based on an interview I did with him at the hotel as well as his public comments later that day in Philadelphia. As this article was long ago, I no longer have any notes from either one.

Philip
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posted 08-26-2007 03:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
STS41-D Charles D Walker:
That they have to return the NASA wrist watches after their space flight

DCCollector
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posted 08-26-2007 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DCCollector   Click Here to Email DCCollector     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At Spacefest, the woman in line ahead of me asked Buzz who he supported for President in 2008. Buzz said he was hoping that Newt Gingrich would get into the race...

KC Stoever
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posted 08-26-2007 07:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KC Stoever   Click Here to Email KC Stoever     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hart--

Thank you for your post. By "with respect to a great man," I meant, "with respect, I disagree with my father, a great man."

Your 2003 interview was fascinating to me then, and now.

I comment on it in 2007, countermanding the great man with reluctance, only because the record is clear: Carpenter sustained a grounding injury in mid-July 1964 before Gemini assignments were made.

Carpenter ended his career in space by accident, not Kraft by intent. But in 2003, in an interview, Carpenter defaulted to the noxious Kraft lore because the accident could not be fully comprehended or owned.

In the intervening 40+ years, it's important to know the sequence of events. That's all.

Best regards,
Kris

marshallspacerx
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posted 10-03-2007 09:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for marshallspacerx   Click Here to Email marshallspacerx     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is what an astronaut wanted to tell me.

Waiting with patience at the UACC/KSC show last June to meet Buzz Aldrin I noticed Buzz kept looking over at me as if he wanted to tell me something. Had he noticed the obvious "Astronaut qualities" in me. Maybe "The Right Stuff"? What could it be? As I intently focused on what he was about to say my wife came and pulling me away said "Come on we are late for the bus tour. As we walked away she said "You need to zip your pants"!

I don't think Buzz saw the Right Stuff.

robsouth
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posted 10-04-2007 12:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I remember my first meeting with Alexi Leonov, it was at Autographica and it was in the gents! I looked over at the man standing next to me and recognised the face. Quite a surreal experience to meet someone you had read about and seen on TV taking a whizz in the next urinal. I tried not to stare but he must have known he had been spotted, I simply nodded my head as he left.

Delta7
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posted 01-09-2008 10:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here are my encounters:

Deke Slayton. I was staying at a hotel in the Washington D.C. area in the mid-1980s, and saw Deke sitting at a table having breakfast with a bunch of people. I mentioned to one of the others in my group who he was, and one friend wondered why I didn't go over and say Hi. I explained I didn't want to bother him and felt he was entitled to eat his breakfast without being disturbed. Well, to my horror my friend proceeded to walk over to Deke's table and explain that his friend was a big fan but too shy to introduce himself. With that, I saw Deke give me a "come on over" wave. We introduced ourselves, talked for about a minute or two, and he gave me his Space Services Inc. business card (which sits framed on my shelf today!). Deke couldn't have been more gracious over having his meal interrupted. Just a super experience, and one I'll never forget!

Robert Parker, at a talk he gave in Stamford CT about the Shuttle in 1978.

Guion Bluford at an airshow in Bradley CT, late 1980s.

John Grunsfeld in 2003. I used to fly with a guy who was a former NASA JSC employee and who knew many of the astronauts. We ran into Grunsfeld at an airport in IL as he was preparing to leave in his own airplane. My colleague introduced me, and we talked for a good 10 minutes. As he was leaving, he reached into his briefcase and gave each of us a STS-109 patch. Another framed prize possession sitting on my shelf.

John Blaha at a KSC Astronaut Encounter in 2006. Got my picture taken with him. Framed...

Dominic Antonelli in 2005. I was at the airport FBO in St. Petersburg FL, and was checking the weather on computer when I sensed someone looking over my shoulder. I turned around and saw it was obviously an Astronaut in blue flight suit and NASA patch. I had to look at his name tag to figure out who he was (I first thought it was Rick Sturckow). I asked him if he needed to use the computer, but he said no thanks he was just checking weather. Later watched him taxi out and takeoff in a T-38.

music_space
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posted 01-11-2008 10:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Al Bean at the Sims & Hankow in NJ, as I was mentionning he should be pushing for an exhibition of his work: "I let that to others. Apply yourself to your craft". Such exhibitions finally took place in recent years.

Scott Carpenter at one of the AHOF induction week-end, to the question: "Are you still a poet, sir?" "Yes, I guess I still am!"

Julie Payette, at a Cirque du Soleil premiere party in Houston, told me about her work in international cooperation with the ISS. After about 20 minutes of conversation, she excused herself on the ground that she was starting her day on a T-38 early the next morning.

And, as a most conventional reply to a most conventional question, Wally Schirra: "You bet your sweet a-- I am!"

------------------
François Guay
Collector of litterature, notebooks, equipment and memories!

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Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





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