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Author Topic:   RNASA National Space Trophy winners
Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-25-2006 08:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RNASA release
Astronaut Eileen Collins Wins 2006 National Space Trophy

The Board of Advisors of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation is pleased to announce that Astronaut Eileen Collins, the first female Space Shuttle Commander, is the recipient of the prestigious 2006 National Space Trophy. She is the first woman to receive this honor.

The award is presented annually to an individual who has excelled in furthering national goals in the field of space. Col. Collins receives this award as NASA’s first female Space Shuttle Pilot and Commander. She commanded the Return-to-Flight STS-114 mission in 2005, the first flight since the Columbia accident in 2003. Former Space Shuttle Commander Brewster Shaw, Vice President and General Manager of Boeing NASA Systems and RNASA Advisor, said, “As NASA’s first female Space Shuttle Pilot and Commander, Eileen Collins has been a pathfinder, leader and role model, and is the embodiment of women in the aerospace industry.”

Air Force Colonel (Ret.) Eileen Collins was selected as a pilot astronaut in 1990. Her first flight was the first for a female pilot. STS-63 in February 1995 performed a first rendezvous with the Russian Space Station Mir. Her next flight as pilot was STS-84 that docked with Mir in May 1997. Her historic third flight was STS-93, the first American space mission ever commanded by a woman. STS-93 deployed the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Last July, Collins commanded the STS-114 Return-to- Flight mission that docked with the International Space Station and evaluated new procedures for flight safety and Shuttle inspection and repair techniques. Collins has now logged over 872 hours in space. Originally from Elmira, New York, Collins earned her associate’s degree in math/science from Corning Community College in 1976, her BA in math and economics from Syracuse University in 1987, an MS in operations research from Stanford in 1986, and a MA in space systems management from Webster University in 1989. Prior to joining NASA, Collins was a T-38 instructor pilot at Vance AFB in Oklahoma, and a C-141 commander and instructor at Travis AFB in California. From 1986 to 1989 she taught math at the USAF Academy in Colorado and was a T-41 instructor. She graduated from Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards AFB in 1990 before joining NASA.

RNASA Advisor and CNN anchor Miles O’Brien said that Colonel Collins is, “First in everything she has done–courageous–skilled–always prepared–a true pioneer.”

Col. Collins will receive her award at a black-tie multi-media event on Friday, March 24, 2006 at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Houston. Attendance at this special 20th anniversary event (previous trophy winners expected) is by invitation or through corporate sponsorship only.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-02-2007 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RNASA release
Gene Kranz Named 2007 RNASA Space Trophy Winner

Floyd Bennett, President of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation of Houston, Texas is pleased to announce that the Foundation's National Board of Advisors has selected Eugene F. "Gene" Kranz to receive its highest honor, the National Space Trophy for 2007. The award has been presented annually for the past 21 years to an individual who has excelled in furthering national goals in the field of space.

Mr. Kranz's citation reads: "For outstanding achievements in his pivotal role in the development of flight control operations for all NASA manned space flights. World renowned for his resolve during the Apollo 13 trans-lunar abort rescue, failure was never an option." -- Joseph P. Kerwin, former Astronaut and President Wyle Labs (Retired).

Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., former Director, of NASA Johnson Space Center and a previous winner of the National Space Trophy stated: "Gene Kranz has been one of the leading contributors to the exploration of space since the beginning of the space program in the U S. He has been prominent throughout his career in developing the concepts of flight control and is particularly known for his leadership and development of the flight control teams upon which human space flight depended for its success. He is most famous for the large roll he played in the rescue of Apollo 13. Kranz continues to be a bulwark in the space flight world and has lent his expertise to many groups throughout the country by providing advice on how to motivate people."

Mr. Kranz will receive his trophy at the RNASA annual banquet to be held on Friday, April 20, 2007 in Houston.

Eugene F. "Gene" Kranz Biography

Mr. Kranz was born on August 17, 1933, in Toledo Ohio, and received his BS Degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Parks College of Saint Louis University in 1954.

He was commissioned in the U.S. Air Force in 1954, and flew high performance jet fighter aircraft including the F-80, F-86, and the F-100. In 1958 he served as a Flight Test Engineer at Holloman AFB, New Mexico, for McDonnell Aircraft developing the Quail Decoy Missile for the B-47 and B-52 aircraft. He was discharged from the Air Force Reserve as a Captain in 1972.

Mr. Kranz is married to the former Marta I. Cadena of Eagle Pass, Texas. The family has six children.

In 1960, Mr Kranz joined the NASA Space Task Group at Langley Virginia and was assigned as Assistant Flight Director for Project Mercury. He assumed Flight Director duties for all Project Gemini Missions, and was the Branch Chief for Flight Control Operations.

Mr. Kranz was selected as Division Chief for Flight Control in 1968, and continued his duties as Flight Director for the Apollo Program. He was the Flight Director for many Apollo missions including the Apollo 11 lunar Landing, and he led the "Tiger Team" for the successful return of the Apollo 13 crew.

He performed as both a Flight Director and Flight Operations Director for the Skylab program, and, at its conclusion, was assigned as Deputy Director of Flight Operations with responsibility for space flight planning, training and mission operations, aircraft operations and astronaut operations.

In 1983, Mr. Kranz was assigned as Director of Mission Operations with responsibilities for all aspects of mission design, testing, planning, training and spaceflight operations. Additionally he was responsible for the design, development, maintenance, and operations of all related mission facilities, as well as the preparation of the Shuttle flight software. In this capacity, he was responsible for over 6000 employees with an annual budget of approximately $750 million.

Mr. Kranz retired from NASA in March 1994 after 37 years of federal service. Current activities include consulting and motivational speaking to professional, civic and youth groups. He is a Flight Engineer on a B-17 "Flying Fortress," performing at Airshows throughout the United States. Since retirement, he has completed building an aerobatic biplane, with engine testing and estimated first flight in the summer of 2002.

Mr. Kranz was a co-recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom awarded by President Nixon for the Apollo 13 Mission, and was designated a Distinguished member of the Senior Executive Service by President Reagan.

Mr. Kranz was the author of the "Spaceflight" section of the 1984 and 1988 World Book Encyclopedia.

Mr. Kranz is a New York Times best selling author. His book Failure is Not an Option was published by Simon and Schuster in April 2000 and in paperback form by Berkley Books in 2002. The book chronicles his work in Mission Control from Project Mercury through Apollo 13 and beyond. The book was selected by the History Channel as the basis for two documentary programs on Mission Control broadcast as two-hour specials in August 2003 and 2005.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-22-2008 11:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RNASA Foundation release
Eugene Cernan Named 2008 RNASA Space Trophy Winner

Rodolfo Gonzalez, President of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation of Houston, Texas is pleased to announce that the Foundation's National Board of Advisors has selected Captain Eugene "Gene" Cernan (USN, Ret.) to receive its highest honor, the National Space Trophy for 2008. The award has been presented annually for the past 22 years to an individual who has excelled in furthering national goals in the field of space.

Capt. Cernan's citation reads, "For outstanding achievements as an astronaut. Second American to walk in space (Gemini IX); crew member on second flight to the moon (Apollo X); and Commander of the last landing on the moon (Apollo XVII); and as an advocate for space exploration and education."

The 2007 Trophy winner and former Flight Director Gene Kranz said, "I had the privilege of launching Cernan on his first mission into space and again at the beginning of his journey on Apollo 17. 'Geno,' as he was known to the controllers, left nothing to chance. His preparation for a mission was flawless, in-flight performance top-notch, and post flight parties for the memory books."

Captain Cernan will receive his trophy at the RNASA annual black-tie banquet to be held on Friday, April 25, 2008, at the Hyatt Regency Houston. CNN Correspondent Miles O'Brien will serve as Master of Ceremonies, and Mr. Tom Short, President of Anadarko Industries and a long-time business associate of Captain Cernan, will present the National Space Trophy.

Attendance at the annual Rotary National Award for Space Achievement banquet is by invitation or through corporate sponsorship only. Information on corporate tickets can be obtained by contacting Bill Taylor at sales@rnasa.org.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-26-2008 08:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Related news from RNASA:
Neil deGrasse Tyson to Receive Space Communicator Award

The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation has selected renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, PhD, to receive the 2008 Space Communicator Award. The citation reads, "in recognition of his immense contributions to the public's understanding of and appreciation for the importance of space exploration."

Tyson is an astrophysicist and the Frederick P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. His areas of study include star formation, exploding stars, dwarf galaxies, and the structure of the Milky Way.

RNASA Advisor Jeffrey E. Carr said, "Dr. Tyson commands an uncommon grasp of the connections between the human and astrophysical elements of our universe, and our need as humans to explore it. His remarkable ability to bring those connections to life for audiences in ways that are understandable, entertaining and compelling has contributed immeasurably to the public's understanding of and support for space exploration."

Tyson is the author of eight books that have educated millions of people on space topics. His latest book is the playful Death By Black Hole-and Other Cosmic Quandaries (W.W. Norton, New York, 2007), which was a New York Times bestseller. He is a contributing essayist for Natural History magazine under the title "Universe," and has become a recognized spokesman for space science through his role as on-camera host for the PBS-NOVA 4-part mini-series Origins which aired in September 2004, and its spin-off program NOVA ScienceNow, a look at the science that shapes the understanding of our place in the universe.

As a member of the NASA Advisory Council since 2006, Tyson helps guide the Agency in implementing its vision within its limited budget. He previously served on the 9-member Presidential commission on the Implementation of the United States Space Exploration Policy that produced the report, A Journey to Inspire, Innovate, and Discover in 2004.

Tyson is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. He holds a BA in physics from Harvard, a MA in astronomy from the University of Texas, and a PhD in astrophysics from Columbia University.

The RNASA Space Communicator Award was created in 1997 in honor of KTRK, Houston Channel 13 space reporter and long-time RNASA Advisor Stephen Gauvain who was tragically killed in a car accident in 1996. The Award is presented to an individual or team that makes exceptional contributions to public understanding and appreciation of space exploration. Previous recipients include William Harwood of CBS, Miles O'Brien of CNN, Elliot Pulham of the Space Foundation, the NASA-Contractor Communications team that responded to the Columbia accident, and Mark Carreau of the Houston Chronicle.

Dr. Tyson will receive his award at the RNASA annual black-tie gala to be held on Friday, April 25, 2008, at the Hyatt Regency Houston. Former Gemini and Apollo astronaut Capt. Eugene Cernan (USN, Ret.) will be presented with the National Space Trophy at this event. Also, from among 130 nominees, the winners of Stellar Awards in each of four categories will be announced at the banquet. CNN Correspondent Miles O'Brien will serve as Master of Ceremonies.

DChudwin
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posted 01-27-2009 09:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DChudwin   Click Here to Email DChudwin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RNASA release
Former NASA Administrator Michael Griffin National Space Trophy 2009 Winner

The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation's National Board of Advisors has selected former NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin to receive its highest honor, the National Space Trophy. The award has been presented annually for the past 23 years to an individual who has excelled in furthering national goals in the field of space.

Rodolfo Gonzalez, President of the RNASA Foundation in Houston, Texas, reported that Griffin was selected for the National Space Trophy for: developing the plan for completion of the International Space Station following the loss of Space Shuttle Columbia, personally directing the shuttle return-to-flight activities; initiating the first procurement of commercial cargo and crew service in the agency's history; successfully establishing the architecture for a sustainable, achievable, and technically viable human exploration program; and awarding the initial spacecraft and launch vehicle contracts that will ensure the program meets its demanding schedule.

Griffin is also being recognized for the impressive series of senior government and industry executive positions he held prior to being named NASA administrator. These positions include Space Department head of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab where he oversaw and directly supervised the final preparation, launch, and early mission operations for the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury; president and COO of In-Q-Tel, where he led a private non-profit, strategic venture capital organization created to identify and develop advanced technologies for Central Intelligence Agency applications; and executive positions with Orbital Sciences Corporation, Space Industries International, and American Rocket Company; service as the NASA chief engineer and associate administrator for Exploration; and the deputy for technology for the Department of Defense's Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO).

A strong advocate for education, Griffin holds six postgraduate degrees and has served as an adjunct professor and lecturer at three different universities. He is also the lead author for more than two dozen technical papers as well as writing the definitive textbook on space vehicle design.

Robert Pearlman
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RNASA release
NASA's Bill Gerstenmaier Honored With National Space Trophy

The Board of Advisors of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation has selected NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, William (Bill) H. Gerstenmaier, as the recipient of the 2010 National Space Trophy. As Associate Administrator, Gerstenmaier is responsible for oversight of all NASA's Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), space launch services programs, the astronaut crew health program and the communication systems network.

Rodolfo Gonzalez, President of the RNASA Foundation in Houston, Texas, reported that Gerstenmaier was nominated for "his unwavering commitment and remarkable contributions to human space flight and providing outstanding leadership and direction to the exploration of space through his contributions to the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs."

Director of NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia, Mrs. Lesa B. Roe, former NASA Administrator Mike Griffin, Johnson Space Center Director Mike Coats, and RNASA Advisor and Apollo 17 Astronaut Harrison Schmitt nominated Gerstenmaier.

Roe said, "Gerstenmaier's career achievements and personal initiatives have had a direct impact on the current U.S. human space flight program, the international community, and residents of planet Earth. His efforts will continue to shape the future of space exploration for many years to come."

"It was my honor to work with Bill for four years," said Griffin, who received the National Space Trophy last year. "Quite simply, Bill Gerstenmaier is regarded as the ultimate authority on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. When he says something, people listen, and they know that what he says is true."

Coats added, "Bill's impact in the space community is unparalleled. He has literally guided an international group of thousands of individuals in many countries in furthering human space flight and assuring a continued human presence in space. The partnerships we currently enjoy with our international partners for the ISS are largely due to Bill's tremendous efforts and diligence."

Schmitt noted that "Gerstenmaier has masterfully carried the primary senior management responsibility (since 2005) for the success of Space Shuttle and International Space Station activities."

The RNASA Foundation is pleased to honor Bill Gerstenmaier at the 24th annual awards gala on April 30, 2010 at the Houston Hyatt Regency hotel. See rnasa.org for information about the event.


William H. Gerstenmaier is the Associate Administrator for Space Operations at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC. In this position, Gerstenmaier directs NASA's human exploration of space. He also has programmatic oversight for the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, space communications and space launch vehicles.

From Akron Ohio, Gerstenmaier began his NASA career in 1977 at the Lewis (now Glenn) Research Center in Cleveland, performing aeronautical research. He was involved with the wind tunnel tests that were used to develop the calibration curves for the air data probes used during entry on the space shuttle.

Gerstenmaier moved to Houston in 1980 to work at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). He served as a Propulsion Officer in the Mission Control Center during the early Space Shuttle program. Beginning in 1988, Gerstenmaier headed the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) Operations Office.

Subsequently, he headed Space Shuttle/Space Station Freedom Assembly Operations Office and served as Chief, Projects and Facilities Branch, Flight Design and Dynamics Division.

Gerstenmaier also served as Shuttle/Mir Program Operations Manager from 1995 to 1997. During this time, he acted as the primary liaison to the Russian Space Agency for operational issues and negotiated all protocols used in support of operations during the Shuttle/Mir missions. In 1997, the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation honored him with a Stellar Award in the Mid-Career category for his work on the Phase 1 Mir program.

In 1998, Gerstenmaier became manager of Space Shuttle Program Integration, where he had responsibility for the overall management, integration, and operations. In December 2000, he was named deputy manager of the International Space Station Program. He was named International Space Station program manager in 2002. He became NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations in 2005 and continues in that capacity today.

Gerstenmaier earned his BS in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University in 1977, an MS in mechanical engineering from the University of Toledo in 1981, and completed course work for a PhD in dynamics and control with emphasis in propulsion at Purdue in 1992-93.

He is married to the former Marsha Ann Johnson. They have two children.

Aviation Week and Space Technology has twice awarded Gerstenmaier with the Laureate Award for "Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Space." NASA recognized him with three Certificates of Commendation, two Exceptional Service Medals, and a Senior NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal. He received the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Executives. The Huntsville National Space Club awarded him the Von Braun award in 2006. The Federation of Galaxy Explorers honored him with the 2007 Space Leadership Award. Purdue has bestowed several awards, including designation as an "Old Master" in 2008. He will receive RNASA's highest award, the National Space Trophy, on April 30, 2010.

Robert Pearlman
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RNASA release
General Kevin P. Chilton to receive 25th National Space Trophy

The Board of Advisors of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation has selected the Commander of U.S. Strategic Command, and former Space Shuttle astronaut, General Kevin P. Chilton (USAF), to receive the 2011 National Space Trophy.

"General Chilton, as an Air Force commander and a former astronaut, is being recognized for his leadership in both our civilian and military space programs," Rodolfo González, President of the RNASA Foundation, said.

Since 2007, General Chilton has been in command of the United States Strategic Command based at Offutt AFB, Nebraska. In this position, he is responsible for the global command and control of U.S. strategic forces to meet decisive national security objectives.

Prior to his current position, Chilton, served on the Air Force Space Command Staff, the Air Staff, the Joint Staff, and commanded the 9th Reconnaissance Wing, 8th Air Force, Joint Functional Component Command for Space and Global Strike, and Air Force Space Command.

A veteran of three shuttle flights, Chilton flew as pilot on the maiden flight of Endeavour on STS-49 in 1992, and as pilot of STS-59, the Space Radar Laboratory mission in 1994. He commanded STS-76, the third docking mission to the Russian Space Station Mir in 1996. He then served as deputy program manager of operations for the International Space Station before leaving NASA in 1998.

Born in Los Angeles, California, Chilton, age 56, is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Air Force Pilot Training and Test Pilot Schools and holds a BS in engineering science from the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs, CO; and an MS in mechanical engineering from Columbia University of New York, NY. He flew operational assignments in the RF-4C and F-15 and weapons testing in the F-4 and F-15 prior to his selection as an astronaut in 1987.

Former Astronaut and current Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of United Space Alliance, Daniel Brandenstein, said in nominating Chilton that "he has demonstrated a combination of strong leadership and exceptional intelligence rarely found in one individual. Through his commitment and on-going advocacy for all types of strategic space pursuits, General Chilton has continually demonstrated a devotion to duty, honor and country that more than qualifies him to join the ranks of those honored with the National Space Trophy."

Chilton has been recognized with numerous awards including the Liethen-Tittle Award as top graduate of the USAF Test Pilot School Class 84A; the Distinguished Service with an oak leaf cluster, Defense Superior Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster, a Distinguished Flying Cross, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, the Air Force Commendation Medal, three NASA Space Flight Medals, a NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal. He is also a Guggenheim Fellow.

Upon the announcement of Chilton's upcoming retirement from the Air Force in March, Strategic Forces Subcommittee Chairman Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) and Ranking Member Michael Turner (R-Ohio) said, "General Chilton's efforts have brought greater focus on our nation's strategic forces, scientific and technical workforce, and industrial base. His candor and expertise were greatly appreciated by this committee, and he will be missed."

Chilton currently resides with his wife Cathy, a Brig. General in the USAF Reserves, in Omaha, Nebraska. They have four children. He enjoys reading and sports and playing rock and roll guitar. He is a member of the Order of Daedalians, the USAF Academy Association of Graduates, and the American Legion.

The RNASA Foundation will present the National Space Trophy to Chilton at its 25th annual Awards Gala on May 6, 2011 at the Houston Hyatt Regency hotel in Houston, Texas. See the RNASA website for information about sponsorships and tickets for the event.

Robert Pearlman
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RNASA release
Rotary Space Foundation Recognizes General Kevin Chilton, 25 Individuals, and Seven Teams with Awards

The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation celebrated its silver anniversary on May 6, 2011 by presenting the National Space Trophy (NST) to former Commander of U.S. Strategic Command and former Astronaut General Kevin P. Chilton, USAF (Ret.), and recognizing 25 individuals and seven teams with Stellar Awards.



With music by pianist Victoria Reva, the gala at the Houston Hyatt Regency was attended by about a thousand members of the aerospace community from around the nation, including seven of the previous NST winners. Also attending were Congressman Pete Olson and Houston City Councilman for District E, Mike Sullivan.

Harris County Judge Ed Emmett welcomed guests to the event, saying, "As a boy who dreamed about space growing up, I really came not to welcome you, but to say thank you."

Houston high school students again participated in the event with the Clear Creek High School JROTC Color Guard (Cadet Col.Cadet Maj. Lucus Duncavage, Cadet CPT Daniel Clemen, Cadet LTC Michael Truitt, and Juan Castillo) presenting the colors, and the national anthem being performed by Clear Springs junior, Bianca Higgins, the winner of the Clear Creek School District's "So You Think You Can Sing" contest.

Father Vincent Nguyen, Pastor of St. Claire of Assisi Catholic Church of Clear Lake provided the invocation. After a spectacular dinner, Space City Films dazzled the audience with a multi-media show displaying the highlights of space achievement during the previous year.

Veteran reporter and emcee Miles O'Brien kicked off the awards portion of the program on a light note with a plan for obtaining a space shuttle orbiter for Houston: have the next crew land it at Ellington near Clear Lake. "Then do what Texans do, claim it as yours and secede from the Union." O'Brien quipped, "How hard can this be?" But, he added more seriously, "I know there's a lot of bruised feelings about what museums the used shuttles go into. But when I think of Houston, I don't think about museums. I don't think about relics. I don't think about docents. I think about doers. To the extent that we bog ourselves down in a debate about where the relics go, I think we take our eye off the ball. The people in this room are all about smoke and fire and speed and exploration. Let's stay focused on that. The final frontier is our goal."

O'Brien delighted the audience with a video spoof he produced about General Chilton's role in the all-astronaut band, Max Q, during his time with NASA from 1987 through 1998. Other former band members including Chris Hadfield and Maj. Gen. Susan Helms appeared in the show.

NASA Astronauts Stephanie D. Wilson and Richard R. Arnold II then took to the podium to present the 2011 RNASA Stellar Awards to two USAF officers, three NASA employees, and 20 individual corporate winners, plus two NASA and five corporate teams. (See end of release for names and citations.)

Astronaut Steven W. Lindsey who commanded the final flight of Space Shuttle Discovery in February, then presented the National Space Trophy to Chilton. He reviewed Chilton's biography, including that he Chilton joined NASA in 1987, flew on STS-49 in 1992, STS-59 in 1994, and STS-76 in 1996. He left NASA in 1998 to rejoin the Air Force. He retired from the Air Force this spring.

Above: Gen. Chilton accepts the National Space Trophy from Col. Steve Lindsey at the RNASA event, May 6, 2011 in Houston. More photos.

Lindsey cited Chilton's "accomplishments and exploits as a fighter pilot, experimental test pilot, astronaut, and superb leader of civilian and military space. He's had a huge impact on our collective professions." Yet, Lindsey said he thinks of him, "as the general who always took time to listen, to mentor, and the guy you knew genuinely cared about you. He's always been approachable. He's always treated everyone with equal respect and care, no matter their position. He's also been able to maintain a successful balance between his four stars and his four daughters." One of Chilton's daughters attended the banquet.

"This is kind of overwhelming for me," Chilton told the crowd. "To be nominated by your peers is a very special thing." He congratulated the Stellar Award winners, saying, "Most Americans don't appreciate the phenomenal work that's still going on every day."

He praised the team of people at Johnson Space Center. "In the 11 years I was with NASA, I felt like I got a PhD in human space flight." He described how the skills and knowledge he gained at NASA served him well when he returned to the Air Force. His astronaut training allowed him to tell the difference between a ballistic missile and a shuttle-like trajectory in data from the North Koreans. His time as deputy program manager for the International Space Station prepared him well for dealing with Pentagon budget issues and negotiating agreements for operations in other countries. "If I was successful at all when I returned to the Air Force, it was because of the 11 years I spent at NASA and learning this business that is so important to us."

Chilton included "the fulfillment of dreams, exploring, answering unanswerable questions, pushing the bar a little further up, trying to get over it," as reasons for "why we get out of bed and come to work in the morning." But he said his own motivation is also more personal, and deeply patriotic. "Someday, in the future, another human being will stand on the Moon. And they'll plant a flag. To me, it matters whether that flag is an American flag or not. Because in the future, when someone does that, the rest of the world is going to look at that country, and say, 'I want to be like those guys.' The human space flight program is not only an inspiration to our youth: it's an inspiration to the entire world. And being a leader in that program is important for the United States of America, and my family."

The evening concluded with Gemini and Apollo veteran Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford, USAF (Ret.) presenting an OMEGA watch to Chilton. Stafford, who is a three-star general, noted that Chilton is the first astronaut to become a four-star general. "You broke the record." He praised his work for the military, saying, "Our nuclear capability had some issues that had degraded which we can't talk about here tonight. The Secretary of Defense and Congress charged General Chilton with reconstituting our nuclear forces: the Air Force has two thirds of the bombers and ICBMs." Stafford also said that Chilton had been assigned to establish Cyber Command. "What an outstanding job you did for the Air Force and for the country, Chili. We're so proud of you."

RNASA President Rodolfo Gonzalez ended the evening by thanking the corporate sponsors: The Aerospace Corporation, Alliant Techsystems, Inc. (ATK), ARES Corporation, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation, Barrios Technology, Bastion Technologies, Inc., The Boeing Corporation, Booz Allen Hamilton, Draper Laboratory, Fisher Space Pen, GeoControl Systems, Inc., GHG Corporation, Hamilton Sundstrand, Honeywell, Jacobs, L-3 STRATIS, Lockheed Martin, ManTech International, MEI Technologies, Inc., Oceaneering Space Systems, Omega Watch, Orbital Sciences Corp., Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, SAIC, SpaceX, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies (SGT), TechTrans International, Inc., UHCL School of Business, United Space Alliance, and Wyle Integrated Science & Engineering. Proceeds remaining after each year's event are donated to an organization involved in aerospace education.

About the RNASA Foundation: Founded by the Space Center Rotary Club in 1985 to organize and coordinate an annual event to recognize outstanding achievements in space and create greater public awareness of the benefits of space exploration, the RNASA Foundation has presented the National Space Trophy to an outstanding American who has made major contributions to our nation's space program since 1987. This year marked the Foundation's 25th anniversary.

Robert Pearlman
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RNASA release
Mike Coats to Receive National Space Trophy

The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation has selected former astronaut, Captain (USN, Ret.), and NASA Johnson Space Center Director Michael L. Coats to receive the 2012 National Space Trophy.

Coats was jointly nominated by two RNASA advisors: previous Trophy winner and former NASA Administrator Dr. Mike Griffin; and former NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Mr. William Parsons. In nominating him, they cited his management as the tenth director of Johnson Space Center "NASA's leading human space flight center," and his "leadership to the retiring Space Shuttle Program, the International Space Station Program, and his advancement of the capability for human exploration and utilization of space research development."

"We are thrilled that the Board of Advisors has selected Coats for recognition this year," Rodolfo Gonzalez, President of the RNASA Foundation, said. Coats will receive the award at a gala at the Houston Hyatt Regency on April 27.

As director of Johnson Space Center (JSC), Coats provides management and administration of NASA resources, programs, projects, and research activities in support of NASA's strategic goals. He's responsible for a team of more than 3,200 civil servants and an annual budget in excess of $4.5 billion dollars.

In the award citation, former KSC Director Parsons wrote that, "Coats worked diligently to effectively balance institutional and program demands, ensuring the safe and successful fly out of NASA's Space Shuttle Program." During 2011, he directly contributed to the successful completion of the International Space Station (ISS) assembly, the final three Shuttle flights, four automated cargo flights, Progress flights, and Soyuz flights. These flights delivered critical spares, supplies, crew, and the final elements to sustain and position the ISS for the coming decade of utilization.

Former NASA Administrator Griffin called Coats, "a naturally gifted leader with excellent communication and people skills." He noted that this past year has been extremely demanding, as well as an emotional one for JSC. "Leading the close-out of the 30-year Space Shuttle Program, a program which has in many ways defined the workforce at JSC, was possibly his most challenging leadership task to date," Griffin said. "Coats was successful because of his abilities as a leader and his consistent approach of proactively sharing information with the entire workforce about on-going program transition activities. He has proven to be an absolute standout among a group of very talented and intelligent directors."

Under Coats' leadership, JSC implemented 80 partnerships with other NASA centers, industry, federal agencies, and academia. With the Greater Houston Partnership, Coats hosted the Innovation and Successful Partnerships Summit to map aerospace skills into non-aerospace industries. The summit included 50 to 70 CEO's from industry along with JSC senior executives. He also worked with contractor and community leaders to ensure those facing job losses had ample resources to find new work by hosting three community job fairs such as a June 2011 event attended by more than 80 employers and 1,000 displaced workers.

His commitment to improving the work environment for civil servants and contractors while maintaining NASA's future leadership capabilities was demonstrated through three significant programs: the Program Project Management Development Program, Space Systems Engineering Development Program, and the Project Leadership Program. His other initiatives included a Joint Leadership Team to advance teamwork at all organizational levels, an Employee Leadership Team to engage lower-level employees, a Formal Mentoring Initiative to develop junior employees, and the Innovation and Inclusion Consortium to promote diversity and innovation throughout the workforce. His Young Professionals Group provided the younger workforce access to senior managers.

Originally from Riverside, California, Coats has spent most of his life serving his country. He earned his BS degree from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1968. His highly decorated career in the Navy included 315 combat missions in Southeast Asia. He holds a master's degree in administration of science and technology (George Washington University, 1977) and in aeronautical engineering (U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, 1979).

Selected as a NASA astronaut in 1978, Coats first flew as pilot of STS 41D in 1984. He commanded STS-29 and STS-39 in 1989 and 1991, respectively. He assumed his first leadership role at NASA in 1989 by serving as the acting chief of the Astronaut Office. Following his third flight, Coats left NASA in 1991 to pursue a successful career in private industry. He was vice president of Avionics and Communications Operations for Loral Space Information Systems, vice president of Civil Space Programs for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space, and vice president of Advanced Space Transportation for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. He returned to NASA in 2005 as the director for JSC.

Coats has been recognized with numerous awards and honors throughout his distinguished career including induction into the Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2007. A man who has publicly noted the importance of maintaining a balance between work and family, he is happily married to the former Diane Carson of Oklahoma City. They have two grown children and identical twin granddaughters.

The RNASA Foundation invites members of the public and aerospace community to attend the black-tie event on April 27 at the Houston Hyatt Regency where Mike Coat's will be recognized with the National Space Trophy. Please see RNASA.org for information about sponsorships and tickets.

About RNASA: The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation was founded by the Space Center Rotary Club of Houston, Texas in 1985 to organize and coordinate an annual event to recognize outstanding achievements in space and create greater public awareness of the benefits of space exploration. The nonprofit Foundation presents the National Space Trophy and Stellar Awards each year.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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posted 01-26-2013 11:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RNASA release
Kay Bailey Hutchison to Receive 2013 National Space Trophy

The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation has selected former United States Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) to receive the 2013 National Space Trophy.

Hutchison was nominated by Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company Executive Vice President Joanne Maguire. In nominating her, Maguire credited Hutchison as a "long standing champion of NASA and DoD space programs" and recognized her bi-partisan leadership ensuring passage of the three-year 2010 NASA Authorization Act. Maguire went on to cite Hutchison's dedication to education excellence, her promotion of the International Space Station Program, and her efforts to support the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, the Space Launch System and commercial space transportation amidst "dramatic program and policy shifts."

"The RNASA Board of Advisors chose a very deserving candidate for recognition. We're thrilled to be honoring Senator Hutchison this year," Rodolfo Gonzalez, President of the RNASA Foundation, said. Senator Hutchison will receive the award at a gala at the Houston Hyatt Regency on April 26, 2013.

Kay Bailey Hutchison is a former United States Senator (R-TX) who served from June 1993 through January 2013. As the first and only woman elected to the Senate from the State of Texas, she also became the first U.S. Senator from Texas to receive four million votes in a single election.

"A pioneer throughout her career, Senator Hutchison reflects the spirit of exploration and discovery that characterizes America's space program," wrote Maguire.

Exercising strong leadership on the Senate Commerce Committee's Science and Space Subcommittee, Hutchison worked hand-in-hand with NASA and the National Science Foundation on behalf of America's space and science programs. In 2005, the Senator helped to draft a five-year plan outlining NASA's exploration and research future which was signed into law by President George W. Bush. In 2010, as the senior Republican on the Senate Commerce Committee, Hutchison was instrumental in forging a NASA reauthorization bill which balanced future NASA exploration missions with commercial space investments, while authorizing funds for an additional shuttle mission.

She also led the charge to promote the International Space Station (ISS) as a National Laboratory. Her support and this designation is stimulating groundbreaking research among government agencies, universities and the private sector aboard the ISS.

Hutchison's commitment to educational excellence has been evident through her work on programs such as the America COMPETES Act and The Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas (TAMEST). The America COMPETES Act, which became law in 2007, invests in the development of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education, and prepares students for future careers in aerospace. In 2010, Hutchison went on to include a provision in the reauthorization bill that allows participating colleges and universities to certify STEM majors as elementary and secondary school teachers.

In her home state of Texas, Hutchison helped establish the Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas (TAMEST) to recognize the state's top achievers in these fields. TAMEST's success has not only brought federal investments to Texas institutions but has established the state as an important destination and center of achievement in these fields. Due to the success of this program, ten Nobel Laureates now call Texas institutions home.

Originally from La Marque, Texas, Hutchison graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962. She went on to earn a J.D. from the University of Texas Law School. Her political career began in 1972, when she served in the Texas House of Representatives until 1976. She went on to serve as vice-chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board from 1976 to 1978. She then left politics for business until 1990 when she was elected Texas State Treasurer. In 1993, Hutchison became the first woman to be elected to represent Texas in the United States Senate. She was re-elected one year later to a six-year-term and again in 2006 by an overwhelming margin. From 2001 to 2007, Hutchison served as the Senate Republican Conference Chairwoman, making her the fifth-ranking Republican in the Senate. During her time in the Senate, she served on the Appropriations, Commerce, Science and Transportation, Rules and Administration, and Veterans' Affairs Committees. She retired from the Senate in January 2013.

Hutchison and her husband, Ray, live in Dallas with their two adopted children.

The RNASA Foundation invites members of the public and aerospace community to attend the black-tie event on April 26 at the Houston Hyatt Regency where Senator Hutchison will be recognized with the National Space Trophy. Please see rnasa.org for information about sponsorships and tickets.

About RNASA: The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation was founded by the Space Center Rotary Club of Houston, Texas in 1985 to organize and coordinate an annual event to recognize outstanding achievements in space and create greater public awareness of the benefits of space exploration. The nonprofit Foundation presents the National Space Trophy and Stellar Awards each year.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 28634
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-22-2014 06:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RNASA release
NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr. to Receive the 2014 National Space Trophy

The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation has selected NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr., retired United States Marine Corps Major General and former astronaut to receive the 2014 National Space Trophy on April 11, 2014, at the Houston Hyatt Regency in Houston, Texas.

Bolden was nominated by Col. Robert Cabana, Director of the Kennedy Space Center and former astronaut, STS-41, STS-53, STS-65 and STS-88, and by Mr. Robert Jacobs, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Communications.

Cabana nominated Bolden for his "many years of dedicated service and exceptional leadership through an extremely challenging transition in America's space program, establishing NASA's exploration architecture for the future, and enabling successful commercial operations to low Earth orbit," and Jacobs nominated Bolden for his "dedication to public service, leadership, and contributions to aeronautics and aerospace throughout a distinguished military and civilian career."

Rodolfo González, President of the RNASA Foundation said, "We are very pleased with the selection of the board of advisors and look forward to celebrating General Bolden's exemplary service."

NASA Administrator and former astronaut Charles F. Bolden, Jr. said, "I am humbled by this selection and will be extremely honored to attend the RNASA Gala in April to accept this award on behalf of the entire NASA-Contractor Team I am privileged to lead."

NASA Administrator Bolden was nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate as the 12th Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He began his duties as head of the agency on July 17, 2009.

As Administrator, Bolden leads a nationwide NASA team to advance the missions and goals of the U.S. space program.

During Bolden's tenure, the agency's science activities include an unprecedented landing on Mars with the Curiosity rover, launch of a spacecraft to Jupiter, enhancing the nation's fleet of Earth-observing satellites, and continued progress toward the 2018 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

A veteran of four space flights, he has logged over 680 hours in space. Bolden served as pilot on STS-61-C (January 12 - 18, 1986) and STS-31 (April 24 - 29, 1990), and was the mission commander on STS-45 (March 24, 1992 - April 2, 1992), and STS-60 (February 3-11, 1994).

Bolden earned a Master of Science degree in systems management from the University of Southern California in 1977. In 1978, he was assigned to the Naval Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, Md., and completed his training in 1979.

Bolden's 34-year career with the Marine Corps also included 14 years as a member of NASA's Astronaut Office. BoldenÕs military decorations include the Navy Astronaut Badge, Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (1 award star), Distinguished Flying Cross, Defense Meritorious Service Medal (1 oak leaf cluster), Air Medal (1 award star and Strike/Flight numeral 8), NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, NASA Exceptional Service Medal (2 award stars), NASA Space Flight Medal (3 award stars), Navy Unit Commendation, National Defense Service Medal (1 service star), Vietnam Service Medal (2 service stars), Vietnam Gallantry Cross unit citation, and the Vietnam Campaign Medal.

On August 28, 2012, Bolden was the first human to have his voice broadcast on the surface of Mars or any other planet. Although the Curiosity rover has no speakers, it received the transmission of his voice and then beamed it back to Earth.

Bolden is married to the former Alexis (Jackie) Walker of Columbia, South Carolina. Their family consists of son Che', a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps, daughter-in-law Penelope "Penny" Jan McDougle from Sydney, Australia, three granddaughters, Mikaley, Kyra, and Yalia, and daughter Kelly Michelle, a plastic surgeon at the Howard University Hospital in Washington.

The RNASA Foundation invites members of the public and the aerospace community to attend the black-tie event on April 11, 2014, at the Houston Hyatt Regency where NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr., will be recognized with the National Space Trophy.

About RNASA: The Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) Foundation was founded by the Space Center Rotary Club of Houston, Texas in 1985 to organize and coordinate an annual event to recognize outstanding achievements in space and create greater public awareness of the benefits of space exploration. The nonprofit Foundation presents the National Space Trophy and Stellar Awards each year.

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