Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Autograph Shows & Signings
  Astronaut Scholars 2009 Tom Stafford signing (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Astronaut Scholars 2009 Tom Stafford signing
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-20-2009 01:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Astronaut Scholarship Foundation release
Gen. Thomas Stafford Private Signing

World renowned astronaut Gen. Thomas Stafford has agreed to come out of signing retirement for a one-time private signing session! Hosted by the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF), the signing will take place this July as a means to raise money for the ASF and to support the curator efforts at The Stafford Air and Space Museum, in Weatherford, Oklahoma, which showcases many of his space artifacts.

Space enthusiasts are invited to send in artifacts, baseballs, covers, flown items, models, photos, and more by July 2, 2009 for the General to enhance with his signature. This is indeed a rare opportunity, as Stafford has not widely signed artifacts since 2003.

Stafford, an accomplished astronaut, flew four times in space. He served as Pilot of Gemini VI in December 1965, Commander of Gemini IX in June 1966, Commander of Apollo 10 in May 1969 and Commander of the joint American-Russian mission, Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975.

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Apollo 10 by adding Stafford's signature to your space collection today! Don't delay, as this opportunity may not present itself again! Items will be accepted from May 19 through July 2, 2009.

spaced out
Member

Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 05-20-2009 02:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
First thought on seeing the topic - Hurray!
Thoughts on reading the fees - Yikes!

When these things are announced you're hoping maybe they'll go for the principle of keep it reasonable and rake in lots of funds by selling bucket-loads of signatures. Then there's kind of a middle ground where the fee is above the going rate for their sigs but worth it for maybe one item. Then there's the kind of fee level where you really have to need that signature desperately to even consider paying that much.

Of course, he's free to charge whatever he feels appropriate, but I can't help thinking he would sell four times as many signatures at around half this amount (say $150), and ten times as many at something closer to say $75.

gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-20-2009 04:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
His going rate at the Burbank show in Sept '04 was $100, I believe.

Correction...$45!!

benguttery
Member

Posts: 542
From: Fort Worth, TX, USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 05-20-2009 07:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for benguttery   Click Here to Email benguttery     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think I might need my lawyer and accountant to get together to interpret the fee schedule.

MrSpace86
Member

Posts: 1379
From: Gardner, KS, USA
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 05-20-2009 08:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I sold an uninscribed Stafford photo for $1.04 on eBay a few weeks ago...

jimsz
Member

Posts: 530
From:
Registered: Aug 2006

posted 05-20-2009 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for jimsz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Too rich for me. It's very generous of him to do this for the ASF but the prices are a bit steep.

I guess they would rather make thousands of dollars signing fewer items rather than earn thousands signing many items.

The animation cel market went this route and then totally collapsed when the collector market could not/would not support the increased prices for an average product.

DChudwin
Member

Posts: 972
From: Lincolnshire IL USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 05-20-2009 10:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DChudwin   Click Here to Email DChudwin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While the prices are high, this signing is to raise funds for ASF and the Stafford Museum, both good causes.

I note the following in the ASF instructions:
"Only a portion of the proceeds are going to the ASF, so tax-deductible donation receipts cannot be issued."

While one can certainly find Stafford autographed items for less, the signing is still useful to those with special items or who want personalizations. As always, no one is forced to participate.

I am pleased Gen. Stafford has agreed to do a signing.

xlsteve
Member

Posts: 368
From: Holbrook MA, USA
Registered: Jul 2008

posted 05-20-2009 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for xlsteve   Click Here to Email xlsteve     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
General Stafford is also signing for the 2009 Astronaut Autograph Club. He was added to the roster later in the year. I was pretty pleased to see it.

kr4mula
Member

Posts: 599
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 05-20-2009 11:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The last few times I've seen him, he's signed everything people brought for free. Hopefully these high fees are really meant to raise money for the scholarships, rather than starting a trend for him.

Spacefest
Member

Posts: 1056
From: Tucson, AZ USA
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 05-20-2009 12:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacefest   Click Here to Email Spacefest     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
@gliderpilotuk:
Burbank was 2004. Leonov was $30, Buzz was $150 (or less) Schweickart was $35 (in his first show), Stafford was less than $100 ( I want to say $40) Gordon Cooper, and Wally Schirra were still alive and $50... my point being that times change. Quickly.

@jimsz:
If folks are willing to shell out $1000 for a platinum ticket to the ASF fall show because it's a good cause, then surely they'll come up with Stafford's fee, and there will be hundreds, not just a few, based upon our three Young signings at $500 base fee. The economy stinks right now, but collectibles don't suffer badly in a recession because they have real value. And remember - your $40 Staffords are now worth $275.

@kr4mula:
Stafford has always routed signing earnings toward his museum in Weatherford, OK. I would expect some sort of split between ASF and the Stafford museum on this.

@all:
This may be Gen. Stafford's last mass signing. Best look at it that way and act now. As stated, he has not signed artifacts in awhile because his former handler wouldn't allow it.

Kim Poor
www.novaspace.com

AJ
Member

Posts: 509
From: Plattsburgh, NY, United States
Registered: Feb 2009

posted 05-20-2009 12:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ   Click Here to Email AJ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm very excited for this opportunity. I agree that the prices are a bit steep, but since General Stafford rarely signs, I think it is a great chance for a lot of collectors. Now comes the decision of what to send!!

DCCollector
Member

Posts: 198
From: Washington, DC USA
Registered: Dec 2006

posted 05-20-2009 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DCCollector   Click Here to Email DCCollector     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by DChudwin:
I note the following in the ASF instructions:
"Only a portion of the proceeds are going to the ASF, so tax-deductible donation receipts cannot be issued."

Technically, like the ASF Astronaut Autograph and Memorabilia Shows, this appears to be a fundraiser for the astronaut-signer, who will then contribute some portion of his earnings -- and take the accompanying tax deduction -- himself. While this is a perfectly legitimate arrangement, I would feel more comfortable if the person paying for the autograph was making the charitable contribution him - or herself.

gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-20-2009 01:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Spacefest:
collectibles don't suffer badly in a recession because they have real value. And remember - your $40 Staffords are now worth $275.
Not true.

We're not going to see Staffords on eBay zipping up from $100 to $275 just because of the signing. In the same way that the signature of nearly every currently-signing astronaut can be had more cheaply at auction/eBay if you're not in search of a personalisation. At signings you pay a premium for the personalisation element, or the chance to complete an item; at shows you pay for the same plus the opportunity to meet the guy. These are personal premiums, not market premiums.

I'm happy to wager that the average Stafford won't cost $275 on-market in the next 12 months. Any takers?

spaced out
Member

Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 05-20-2009 02:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Young's $500 signing fee was pretty-much in line with the market rate for his signed items at the time he first signed so it's not really a fair comparison.

The going rate for a Stafford WSS SP right now is probably in the $50-100 range. A Gemini 9 SP would probably go for $150-200, tops.

Anyway, my point was simply that I suspect he would raise significantly more money overall by charging a lower fee, but then you could argue that he doesn't want to spend several days on end signing stuff.

In the end the best way to think of this is probably that you're paying Stafford for his signature and at the same time making a substantial charitable donation.

jimsz
Member

Posts: 530
From:
Registered: Aug 2006

posted 05-20-2009 03:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jimsz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
@jimsz:
If folks are willing to shell out $1000 for a platinum ticket to the ASF fall show because it's a good cause, then surely they'll come up with Stafford's fee, and there will be hundreds, not just a few, based upon our three Young signings at $500 base fee. The economy stinks right now, but collectibles don't suffer badly in a recession because they have real value. And remember - your $40 Staffords are now worth $275.

I disagree - the quickly increasing signing fees is simply creating a bubble which will pop. What is happening in astro autographs is mirroring exactly what took place in some other collectibles 10 years ago. Those collectibles which were artificially high in price can now be had for 25% or less than what they were selling for.

Mr Stafford can charge whatever he wishes but nobody should be purchasing any autograph with the plan it will appreciate in value.

Spacefest
Member

Posts: 1056
From: Tucson, AZ USA
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 05-20-2009 04:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacefest   Click Here to Email Spacefest     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With all due respect, these aren't animation cels, drawn by sunlight-challenged artists in back rooms - but autographs of flesh and blood famous American heroes many of us have met and interacted with, and that is a time-proven package. (Lincoln, anyone?) The men are artifacts of a heroic effort which is now and always will be unique in time and history.

And like all of us, they are aging. Only they will be gone before we're ready.

And they may stop providing oral history, autographs, and their presence sooner, because of infirmity, diminished capacity, or just plain age. Count your blessings.

Paul23
Member

Posts: 771
From: South East, UK
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 05-20-2009 04:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul23   Click Here to Email Paul23     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think fees are what they are, personally I don't collect autographs because I think they are likely to be worth serious money in years to come, for me its having something that gives me just a tiny connection to the history of space flight.

For me though, part of getting that small connection is to shake hands with the astronaut, ideally get a picture as well and exchange a couple of words, even if it is just a mutual "Hello" and "thank You". For me thats were the buzz is, the only downside of mail in signings is you don't get that moment.

Please don't get me wrong, I know for different reasons different astronauts prefer not to sign at public events and that is their right. In those cases I think it's good that individuals like Gen Stafford and John Young at least make themselves available for those that want through these sorts of private signings. The fact that it also benefits some worthy causes is also a very positive thing.

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 05-20-2009 06:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I doubt we'll see a tremendous rise in Stafford's autograph price on the secondary market. Simply put, I think he has signed too many signatures in the past to make his autograph rare enough to fetch $275 from most dealers.

This signing is probably for those who have a truly unique item that is calling out for a signature... or for collectors who need a specific personalization to complete their collection. And, of course, some may wish to participate partly out of a desire to donate to Stafford's museum and the ASF... which I couldn't blame anyone for doing.

Rob Joyner
Member

Posts: 1292
From: GA, USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 05-20-2009 08:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by benguttery:
I think I might need my lawyer and accountant to get together to interpret the fee schedule.
I hear ya but then you'd have to pay your lawyer and accountant too!

So am I reading the fee chart right? I have a multi-signed poster which includes Cernan. Would that be considered a G9 completion and cost $450?

DCCollector
Member

Posts: 198
From: Washington, DC USA
Registered: Dec 2006

posted 05-20-2009 09:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DCCollector   Click Here to Email DCCollector     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And is one mission included with the base signature fee?

andrewcli
Member

Posts: 328
From: La Jolla, CA, USA
Registered: Jul 2007

posted 05-20-2009 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for andrewcli   Click Here to Email andrewcli     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Or $500 for me. I have both Cernan and Young on my item, even though Cernan wrote "Apollo 17 CDR" and Young wrote "Apollo 16 CDR."

jamato99
Member

Posts: 142
From: Leesburg, VA USA
Registered: Apr 2003

posted 05-21-2009 09:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for jamato99   Click Here to Email jamato99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm glad to see Stafford is signing for a good cause and not greed, but I would think he'd raise a lot more money for the ASF and his museum if he charged a more reasonable amount.

And just because he's charging $275 for his signature at this signing does not mean a picture I got signed in 2004 for $45 is now worth $275. Like anything, an item's value is determined only by what someone is willing to pay for it and you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone willing to pay $275 for a Stafford signature.

I won't be participating, but I hope the signing is a big success.

OLDIE
Member

Posts: 169
From: Portsmouth, England
Registered: Sep 2004

posted 05-21-2009 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for OLDIE     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For those interested in books, signed copies of Tom Stafford's memoir "We Have Capture" can be obtained from AbeBooks. There are at least six with prices below 100 pounds sterling (roughly equivalent to 147 U.S. dollars).

Rob Sumowski
Member

Posts: 464
From: Macon, Georgia
Registered: Feb 2000

posted 05-21-2009 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Sumowski   Click Here to Email Rob Sumowski     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I prefer collecting WWII now. I'm still interested in space, but the difference between dealing with WWII veterans and Apollo veterans is simply profound.

Try it... just ask a D-day veteran to sign a vintage map of Omaha Beach or Normandy or a model of the tank he rode on as he was shot in hedgerows or at the Bulge. Or ask an 85-year old pilot to sign a model of the Corsair or Hellcat he flew right before he was shot down over Peleliu or Tarawa.

These guys almost cry because they are so grateful someone bothered to remember them. It puts a bit of perspective on the space collecting business.

I still love space. And I'm not judging this Stafford signing or the wonderful work of Linn and her staff at the ASF or anything else, but I will tell you this: After dealing with WWII veterans over the past year, my attitude about collecting space has been turned upside down.

jamato99
Member

Posts: 142
From: Leesburg, VA USA
Registered: Apr 2003

posted 05-21-2009 01:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jamato99   Click Here to Email jamato99     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow, Rob... what a cool post. That really does put things into perspective. Sadly, those WWII vets don't get near the recognition they deserve.

Spacefest
Member

Posts: 1056
From: Tucson, AZ USA
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 05-21-2009 01:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacefest   Click Here to Email Spacefest     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed, Rob. The difference between WWII heroes and Apollo is that there are more than a couple dozen (though WWII heroes are disappearing fast)

My father was naval aviator in the Pacific, and won a DFC, but I never got him to open up about it until just before he died. These guys, like test pilots, are modest to a fault.

As for the Apollo guys, most have an "aw shucks" attitude also. The market is driving prices; not vice-versa. Look at Heritage, in the middle of the Great Recession. If you can't afford it. Don't do it. But don't decry heroes as being greedy.

ilbasso
Member

Posts: 1494
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 05-21-2009 03:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed that the WWII veterans made the greater sacrifice - and that the Apollo astronauts did what they did for the good of the country, too. There are fewer of them, and their achievements happened closer to living memory than WWII. My experience at Spacefest this year was that all of the astros were genuinely grateful that people wanted to talk to them about the space program.

I daresay most Americans today, when asked to name an astronaut, might be able to remember Neil Armstrong and maybe John Glenn. [I wonder how many people would be able to name a Shuttle-era astronaut.] How many could name a famous person from WWII other than Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, or maybe Eisenhower or Patton?

Many of us on this forum had the great fortune to be around in the 1960s, but we need to remind ourselves that we're in the great minority. There are many more people alive today who were born after the Moon landings than were born before 1969. Of this I was painfully reminded when I took an Apollo 11 item to the frame store lately and the clerk asked me, "What's Apollo 11?"

To bring it all back on topic - heck yeah, I'm sending a couple of items for General Stafford's signature!! Several people I talked to who had seem him recently remarked that he is looking somewhat more frail these days. I hope that is not the case - but once again I am reminded that these great men will not be with us forever.

gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-21-2009 03:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Sumowski:
the difference between dealing with WWII veterans and Apollo veterans is simply profound.
Rob, as ever, you make perfect sense. Thank you for putting into context these relativities.

generallou
Member

Posts: 114
From: T H, Indiana
Registered: Jun 2005

posted 05-21-2009 06:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for generallou   Click Here to Email generallou     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I too am glad that I joined the AAC again this year since I found out he is signing for it! Also I received an email from them saying this is the last year for the Astronaut Autograph Club sorry to hear that!

MrSpace86
Member

Posts: 1379
From: Gardner, KS, USA
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 05-23-2009 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While I don't always agree with paying high prices for an autograph, no one is forcing us to buy an autograph from the signing.

Unfortunately, the days of obtaining free autographs are starting to dissipate, depending on what you collect. Participating in a Pittsburgh Steelers autograph seesion to celebrate their recent Super Bowl victory left a large hole in my wallet. On the other hand, I obtained the signatures of all the 2008 Kansas Jayhawks National Champions (including all the coaches) on a basketball for free. It all depends on what you like to collect and how far you are willing to go and spend for what you like.

Regarding Stafford, none of my Stafford items are inscribed to me. If I did not invest in the ASF acrylics, I probably would have participated in this signing. I relish having items inscribed to me and I find the high fees worth it over buying something for less cost that is inscribed to someone else or not inscribed at all.

Sure WWII is a great historical event where MILLIONS of people participated. Less than 500 people have flown in space. Less than that have been to the bottom of the ocean in deep sea submersibles.

paulushumungus
Member

Posts: 425
From: Burton, Derbyshire, England
Registered: Oct 2005

posted 05-24-2009 08:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for paulushumungus   Click Here to Email paulushumungus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Sumowski:
These guys almost cry because they are so grateful someone bothered to remember them. It puts a bit of perspective on the space collecting business.
Rob, your comments above are absolutely spot on! I agree totally, the WW2 veterans are so humbled when they see our enthusiasm. They can barely understand why we are so interested in meeting them.

I am afraid that we collectors are our own worst enemy and as long as we carry on paying these inflated prices for signatures then they will carry on taking our money.

Paul23
Member

Posts: 771
From: South East, UK
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 05-24-2009 08:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul23   Click Here to Email Paul23     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Catch 22 though, the day we stop paying them may equally be the day they they all decide to pack it in.

I agree on all the points from both perspectives about WW2 veterans as well by the way. Very well made and all equally correct.

Spacefest
Member

Posts: 1056
From: Tucson, AZ USA
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 05-24-2009 04:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacefest   Click Here to Email Spacefest     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I might note that, while Stafford's resale value is not $275 yet, it is well on it's way after only a week.

jimsz
Member

Posts: 530
From:
Registered: Aug 2006

posted 05-24-2009 07:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jimsz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Sumowski:
These guys almost cry because they are so grateful someone bothered to remember them. It puts a bit of perspective on the space collecting business.
The difference is only 12 men walked on the moon and less than 30 have been to the moon and back.

gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-25-2009 05:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Unsurprisingly you can't compare the traumatic endurances of a war veteran (of whatever nation) - many of whom had no choice but to face terrible experiences - with the voluntary pursuit of exploration.

mikelarson
Member

Posts: 293
From: Port Washington, NY
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 05-25-2009 08:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikelarson   Click Here to Email mikelarson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great Memorial Day topic! And I have an amazing story to share about an interaction with a WWII veteran that just happened a few weeks ago.

My grandfather took part in the Normandy invasion as part of the Big Red One but he died before I was old enough to appreciate all he did. That regret led me to start seeking out stories from other D-Day vets and I thus got interested in WWII history about 10 years ago.

About five years ago I had the opportunity to meet many of the original Band of Brothers at a free book signing. I can't tell you how great of an experience it was. And I even got to know one of the Easy Company veterans and have kept in touch with him occasionally over the years.

I hadn't talked to him since I moved to Japan last year, but last month I overhead a conversation at work with some Japanese co-workers who had just watched the HBO DVD set and were really amazed at their heroism. On a whim, I emailed my veteran friend to ask if he would mind talking to my friends over the phone and share his experiences and compare them to the movie.

Well, he not only agreed to talk to my friends, but a couple of weeks ago he got up very early in the morning due to the time difference, answered every question they had with amazing detail, and patiently waited through some language translations that I had to make on a couple of parts. All in the course of almost two hours. And afterwords he sent them autographs and paid for the postage to Japan himself.

And the detail of his story, wow...he paints a much more vivid picture of the battles than I remember from reading the book or watching the HBO series. Things like the sound German artillery fire made as the bullets pierced his parachute nylon during the jump into Normandy, etc. All from a man in his 80's...

Now I'm not saying that any of the astronauts wouldn't also go to this length, and it's unfair to compare historical accomplishments as both are different and impressive in their own right. It's also the astronaut's right to charge whatever they want for their autograph, and we as collectors and consumers have the right to buy it or not. Some collectors will find that Stafford's current fee provides value to them (either financial or emotional), and some won't. And Stafford has seen people profit off his autograph for years so I can't fault him for wanting to get in on the game, especially considering his age.

But another thing, don't try to lesson the impact or contributions our WWII veterans made just because there were more of them than the astronauts.

But in the end it's not an either/or debate. I encourage all space collectors to listen to the stories of our war veterans as they were pioneers and heroes of a different sort. And don't forget the brave soldiers who also served our country in Vietnam, Korea, Iraq, etc. They also have a compelling, if not more recent, story to tell.

mikelarson
Member

Posts: 293
From: Port Washington, NY
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 05-25-2009 08:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikelarson   Click Here to Email mikelarson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And for those who think the private signing price is too high, Gregg at the Space Source has lots of signed Stafford items for sale at lower prices, including uninscribed WSS lithos for $129.

ilbasso
Member

Posts: 1494
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 05-25-2009 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't forget that many of the M-G-A astronauts were themselves veterans of combat. Neil Armstrong was shot down by anti-aircraft fire over Korea in September 1951. Buzz Aldrin flew 66 combat missions in Korea and shot down two MIGs. The list goes on. The astronauts who were test pilots saw many of their buddies die in the line of duty.

And yes, the astronauts did their job voluntarily, but nonetheless at great personal risk. Bill Anders said he figured he had about a one out of three chance he wouldn't make it back from the Moon alive on Apollo 8. That's worse odds than B-17 crews had in WWII.

No matter how you slice it, these are brave folks.

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 05-25-2009 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ilbasso:
Bill Anders said he figured he had about a one out of three chance he wouldn't make it back from the Moon alive on Apollo 8. That's worse odds than B-17 crews had in WWII.
That depends somewhat on what time of the war you were flying in. If it was 1945 and you had P-51 escorts, your odds were much better than if it was 1943 and your fighter escorts couldn't make the full trip with you. I would guess your odds were worse than 1 in 3 of being eventually shot down (before completing the required 25 missions) if you flew on those early missions.

ilbasso
Member

Posts: 1494
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 05-25-2009 02:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was speaking of a single mission.


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement