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  [RR Auction] Space and Aviation (May 2013)

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Author Topic:   [RR Auction] Space and Aviation (May 2013)
BLivingston
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Posts: 39
From: Amherst, NH USA
Registered: Jan 2010

posted 03-26-2013 11:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BLivingston   Click Here to Email BLivingston     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RR Auction's May Space and Aviation sale is shaping up to be our best yet, with a premier offering of the Apollo 11 command module rotation control handle shared by Aldrin and Collins on their historic trip to and from the moon.

Other notable items include: a visually stunning gold plated exact production representative example of the lunar traverse gravimeter used on Apollo 17, a portable life support system dust plug carried to the lunar surface on board the Apollo 12 lunar module Intrepid, and a highly-prized flight plan page, notated in-flight by all three Apollo 11 crew members.

The space treasure continues with a highly important Apollo lunar module flight director attitude indicator, an exceptionally pristine Apollo 17 flown robbins medal with handwritten certification from Cernan, and a scarce Apollo Block 1 Control Panel.

The over 800 lot auction, bursting with both rare flown artifacts and unique signed material, will take place from May 16 to May 23 — the full preview will be available beginning April 26th.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-01-2013 03:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
RR Auction release
RR Auctions Announces 2013 Space & Aviation Autograph & Artifact Auction

Offerings include over 850 museum quality artifacts from the Golden Age of aviation and space flight

RR Auctions is pleased to announce its Space and Aviation Autograph and Artifact Auction, scheduled to take place from May 16th to May 23rd, 2013. This massive auction of over 850 premiere lots of space and aviation memorabilia and artifacts includes some of the rarest and most impressive artifacts yet offered by RR in this rapidly growing and highly sought after genre of Americana collecting.

This historic sale includes fascinating selections of space and aviation related autographs, covers, photos, patches, hardware, correspondence, reports, and many types of flown personal mementos and equipment originating from many of the aviators' and astronauts' collections themselves, as well as from the personal holdings of many of the hobby's leading space artifact collectors.

"There seems to be no end to the global appetite of collectors of this rare and historic material — especially from the amazing Apollo lunar landing missions," said Bobby Livingston, Vice President, Sales & Marketing for RR Auctions. "The Great Space Race was truly a global event, and the collection of memorabilia and artifacts tied to that momentous moment in history is highly prized and sought after. RR Auctions is proud to be able to offer some of the finest and most interesting material available, and this assemblage is by far our most impressive since we began offering specialty aviation and space memorabilia auctions several years ago."

Some representative highlights from the 850+ lots of vintage aviation and space artifact include:

  • A robust offering of flown Robbins medallions from 13 missions, including the key missions of Apollo 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, as well as from ASTP, Skylab and the Shuttle.

  • Over 85 lots of historic Apollo 11 material, including a flown Apollo 11 rotational control handle shared by moonwalker Buzz Aldrin and Command Module Pilot Michael Collins during mankind's first lunar landing mission.

  • And 29 lots of Apollo 17 material from the last lunar landing mission of Apollo, including fantastic lunar orbit items such as a flown 17 foot long lunar orbit map and lunar orbit EVA cue card, and lunar surface EVA cue cards and a lunar surface EVA map plate used aboard the lunar rover.

  • An absolutely amazing gold plated Lunar Traverse Gravimeter, a production model of the same gravimeter used on the lunar surface during the Apollo 17 mission. One of only three in existence — one left on the lunar surface by Apollo 17, the mission's back-up at the Smithsonian, and one other at Columbia University.

  • A unique assemblage of space flown and lunar surface religious artifacts include microfilm bibles from both Apollo and the International Space Station, an Earth-orbit papal flag, a lunar surface flown prayer covenant, and an astounding 750+ page full-text daily prayer and devotional book flown and used aboard Skylab and one of the very few space flown books available to private collectors.

  • And many, many more exciting and historic lots.
As a renowned autograph auction company, RRAuction has not forgotten the essential element of its core business — signatures. Numerous autographs from the best of the best are to be offered, from Wernher von Braun to Neil Armstrong; from astronauts such as Cernan, Lovell, Anders, to cosmonauts such as Gagarin, Leonov, and Tereshkova; to some of America's earliest aviation pioneers like Earhart, Lindbergh, Hughes and Wright.

"Our last auction set record prices for many classes of this material. Aviation and space enthusiasts will not be disappointed," said Livingston. "Obviously, there are too many lots to list in a single press release, so I encourage everyone interested to get online and preview the entire catalog. The auction goes live on May 16th, and global interest is expected to be intense."

For more information on this historic auction, including how to order a catalog, how to bid online, and to see the full 850+ lot description preview, please go to the RRAuction website.

ozspace
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Posts: 84
From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Registered: May 2009

posted 05-03-2013 02:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ozspace   Click Here to Email ozspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That Apollo 11 rotational control handle is marked as "Temporary Removal" and is a flown item from Columbia.

Shouldn't this be the property of the Smithsonian and restored to the CM? I don't want to infer any wrong doing but would there have been a legal ownership transfer to Mr. Bill Whipkey?

albatron
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From: Stuart, Florida, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 05-03-2013 08:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for albatron   Click Here to Email albatron     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know of one other Apollo CMP who was given his "stick", and seem to recall they were given them.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-03-2013 09:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
By his own admission though, Bill Whipkey was not the intended, but the defacto, self-awarded recipient. From Aurora Auctions' April 2004 catalog, where this piece was first listed:
The consignor has told us, according to his memory and the fact that this unit was stored in his (post-retirement) "Apollo 11" storage box, that this unit was removed from Apollo 11 after the flight and given to him by NASA personnel to be display mounted for presentation purposes. It was never retrieved and he stored it in his office safe awaiting retrieval while he was at NASA. When he retired he was told to clean out his safe and to throw away anything not currently needed. Instead of throwing this piece away, he decided to keep it as a souvenir of his years at NASA. He subsequently told one of the Apollo 11 astronauts about the piece and asked him if he wanted it. When told no, he put it away again until now.
I would imagine had Whipkey contacted the Smithsonian and asked the same as he did of the Apollo 11 astronaut, the answer might have been different.

ozspace
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From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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posted 05-03-2013 10:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ozspace   Click Here to Email ozspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds like this was mounted for display and was 'lost' in bureaucratic bungle. It was not awarded to him or anyone and NASA did not dispose of it.

I think NASA or the Smithsonian should step in and take it back to public ownership. It belongs in a museum or even reinstalled into Columbia, what is there now?

SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-03-2013 10:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Replacement RHC grips are currently installed in Columbia.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-03-2013 10:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The fact that it was provided to Whipkey for preparation indicates that NASA was preparing to divest of the control handle, though clearly not to Whipkey himself.

The Apollo 11 astronauts turned down other items offered to later crews, including the patches from their spacesuits, as they recognized the significance of the hardware from the first lunar landing.

Whoever at NASA thought it was a good idea to separate this handle (and the translational control handle sold by Whipkey separately) from the spacecraft didn't have the same sense of history, unfortunately.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-18-2013 01:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Neil Armstrong's heartbeat, Apollo joystick pulled from auction after NASA inquiry

The joystick controller used to steer the Apollo 11 spacecraft to the moon, the original recording of Neil Armstrong's heartbeat when he took humankind's first "small step" onto the lunar surface, and the complete tool kit carried on NASA's final manned moon mission won't be auctioned later this month, despite international headlines that heralded the rare space artifacts' sale.

...The rare moon memorabilia was pulled from the sale after NASA requested time to look into the artifacts' ownership, according to RR. The agency's general counsel wanted to ensure that the items were no longer federal property.

ozspace
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Posts: 84
From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Registered: May 2009

posted 05-18-2013 07:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ozspace   Click Here to Email ozspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great news that the ownership of these items are being investigated. I do hope the hand controller gets restored into Columbia!

Larry McGlynn
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From: Boston, MA
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posted 05-18-2013 08:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What about the buyer of the Apollo 11 rotation hand controller (RHC) joystick?

He purchased that item based on the original consignor's claim of ownership. He purchased the joystick in good faith, spent the money and NASA did not stop the auction.

NASA did know that these auctions were occurring, because the OIG reports are full of investigations into many of these auctions with no replevin action being taken.

I feel for that gentleman. I feel for the original seller too.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-18-2013 08:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The buyer (RR Auction's consignor) has the option of considering the money he spent in 2004 as the fee to hold onto to the joystick for the near-decade that he did, while compensating the original consignor for his service safekeeping the joystick for the years that he did.

Granted, he could be under economic pressure that could make that option less desirable, but there's no requirement that the consignor feel that he is due a refund. There is also the (altruistic) award of reuniting a historic artifact with its source.

Recently, without publicity, a very similar situation occurred, where public property was returned by its private owner without the need for compensation, even though the original purchase was made in good faith. It is just a matter of personal choices.

Greggy_D
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Posts: 629
From: Michigan
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posted 05-18-2013 11:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greggy_D   Click Here to Email Greggy_D     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A fee? That's reaching a bit don't you think, Robert? How many of us on this board make artifact purchases where the possibility of a "safekeeping fee" is a factor in our purchase decision? Most likely none of us. Whether we fork out $1K, $10K, or $80K for an auctioned artifact, we expect that item is ours free and clear. We shouldn't have look over our shoulder for decades waiting for that possible knock on the door from NASA's OIG.

When I first read your article, my initial thought was, "here we go again". Granted the law has been changed for the astronauts and not for the regular Joes, but the actions, timing, and circumstances around NASA's interest in these artifacts seems to be the same as the Apollo 13 Lovell checklist debacle.

As Larry mentioned, NASA has been well aware of the past sales of these items. I don't know why, but I have a gut feeling that a cS'er may have tipped NASA off in this particular RR auction instance.

rjurek349
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posted 05-18-2013 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for rjurek349   Click Here to Email rjurek349     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The lesson is learned now, and for some at a cost. In light of 4158, for flown material, only deal with those items with direct astronaut flight certification and provenance. That puts a whole new light and value on that class of material. The other stuff? Depending on NASA's mood, open to replevin.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-18-2013 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Rich, I disagree. There are plenty of artifacts with solid provenance obtained through the General Services Administration (GSA) and other sources (including deaccessed items from the Smithsonian and other museums) that in some ways are more legally ironclad than even the astronauts can offer with the protections now afforded them by the law.

It has been, and always will be, that when dealing with former federal property, provenance is paramount. For many years, collectors paid that key lesson lip service (the Apollo 11 rotation and translational hand controllers are an excellent example; the original auction descriptions made it clear that there was never any formal transfer and those who bid and bought them were knowingly taking their chances by doing so).

I was guilty of the same. I bought pieces where the paperwork was "missing" or which the chain of ownership wasn't full documented. In hindsight, where I couldn't fill in the provenance for those items with additional research, I made a mistake adding the pieces to my collection.

Greg, we are all temporary custodians of the artifacts we hold in our collections. If history is better (or more properly) served by writing a once wrong, I would like to think that most of our community would put the interests of history above their own. I have done that in more than one instance, surrendering and voluntarily donating items — it's not an unthinkable proposition. Financial gain, or even compensation, does not need to drive our collecting habits.

rjurek349
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posted 05-18-2013 12:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for rjurek349   Click Here to Email rjurek349     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert, we'll have to agree to disagree on that in the sense that, without the astronaut provenance, if NASA made an inquiry, a collector would still have to go through the legal costs and hassles to prove proper ownership etc. 4158 makes that unambiguous for astronaut sourced material. Especially for items that have been sold before.

Greggy_D
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Posts: 629
From: Michigan
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posted 05-18-2013 12:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greggy_D   Click Here to Email Greggy_D     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Financial gain, or even compensation, does not need to drive our collecting habits.

Compensation does drive our collecting habits and always will. After all, most artifacts are sold for compensation rather than being given freely away to the next custodian.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-18-2013 12:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rjurek349:
...without the astronaut provenance, if NASA made an inquiry, a collector would still have to go through the legal costs and hassles to prove proper ownership etc.
NASA could just as easily question if a piece being resold originated from an astronaut's collection. If all the consignor has is a signed COA, well, it's not like astronauts' autographs haven't been forged before.

In fact, if collectors come to believe that only astronaut certification will do, I wouldn't be surprised if we eventually see items being being sold with forged astronaut documentation. (I would be disappointed, but not surprised.)

Getting back to the RR Auction, it looks like at least one of the pieces has the provenance behind it for NASA to clear it for sale (assuming the information since provided proves true). As such, there will be no legal costs and the only expense will be that of the time needed to furnish the requested information.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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From: Houston, TX
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posted 05-18-2013 12:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Greggy_D:
Compensation does drive our collecting habits and always will.
What most are doing today is not necessarily what most will be doing tomorrow. The community changes as sensibilities evolve. Today, we live in an eBay-driven economy; tomorrow, that may not be the case.

Deciding to drive one's collection by its compensation potential is a choice. Some, even today, choose differently.

SkyMan1958
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posted 05-18-2013 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
...there's no requirement that the consignor feel that he is due a refund
I believe that under law the current owner can go after the previous owner for selling items he/she did not in fact own, and the buyer can get their money back. This actually was one of the considerations that drove 4158, as buyers could have gone after the astronauts.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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posted 05-18-2013 12:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What the law affords and what you choose to do are choices, which was my point.

Larry McGlynn
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posted 05-18-2013 01:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert, you did surrender an Apollo 16 pocket purchased at Superior in 2001. Are you getting reimbursed by the consignor? I believe you are very slowly being made whole.

I think the consignor of the RHC will also need to be made whole again. The seller will have to return the money. Especially, if he sold a stolen good.

The consignor will wind up giving the RHC to the National Air and Space Museum just as Mitchell did, but since it is "stolen" property, he cannot even take a tax deduction for the donation. I am not even sure the consignor can claim a tax deduction for the loss of income due to the purchase of a stolen item. If you can do so on IRS form 4684, then it would be pennies on the dollar. While it is easy to say a third party can take the loss, it is unfair for anybody to take a loss of $80,000.

As for forged COAs, that is a risk. Photo documentation will help with that issue. We also have a pretty good knowledge developed over the years of most of what the astronauts brought home. So attempting to forge a COA for something like a lunar boot or a complete RHC arm assembly would raise a question to most of the knowledgeable space collectors which inhabit this board.

You can also forge GSA documents too. Anything can be forged, which is why our paper money is changing.

The interesting thing is that it appears that the Apollo mementos are going to be the zenith of space artifact collecting for a while.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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From: Houston, TX
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posted 05-18-2013 01:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Larry McGlynn:
I believe you are very slowly being made whole.
Yes I am being reimbursed, but then I could have done as other collectors in the same situation did and never surrendered the piece when it was asked that I voluntarily do so.

And while the money is nice, I would have still turned the artifact over even if there was no hope for compensation.

I'm not suggesting that one way of collecting is better than another, just that no one is forced to seek compensation. We all make choices how we collect.

Larry McGlynn
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From: Boston, MA
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posted 05-18-2013 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert, people do have choices. I know many people turned over their items to the government from that situation, but the money was different.

The stakes are higher now. A couple a thousand dollars versus $80,000 changes how people will react.

space1
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From: Danville, Ohio, USA
Registered: Dec 2002

posted 05-18-2013 04:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for space1   Click Here to Email space1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just to add a bit of illumination to the subject of the control handle grips from Apollo 11, they were removed for disposition by Apollo Spacecraft Hardware Utilization Request (ASHUR) just as with each of the other Apollo missions.

------------------
John Fongheiser
Historic Space Systems

SpaceAholic
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posted 05-18-2013 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Disposition to or for ??? (Test Prep Sheet 033)

space1
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posted 05-18-2013 10:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for space1   Click Here to Email space1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Usually the ASHURs related to the grips mention removal by astronaut request. In this case some memos are cited (but no indication of their content). The completion sheet also notes "Ref. DD 1149."

Jurvetson
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From: Menlo Park, CA, United States
Registered: Sep 2011

posted 05-27-2013 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jurvetson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I picked up quite a bit of interesting unflown hardware in this auction, and if anyone here has research or further information on these items, I would love to add that to the flickr posts I will eventually make for each:

248 Lunar Module Translation Control Assembly
249 Apollo Rotation Hand Grip Controller
681 Lunar Traverse Gravimeter (and 269 Beryllium Gear Housing)
246 Apollo Block I Control Panel
247 Apollo Sextant (and 288 Sextant Lens)

585 Dave Scott PLSS Cable

Thanks!

Greggy_D
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posted 05-28-2013 12:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greggy_D   Click Here to Email Greggy_D     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another enjoyable RR auction! For the most part, I've really warmed to the 30 minute bidding rule. You are able to focus on the items you are interested in and bid accordingly without worrying about spending early or holding back bids as you might in a general format auction (HA or Regency).

Regarding that 30 minute rule, on one of the items I was bidding on, I think a counter bidder was confused as to how the rule exactly worked. The bidder would "snipe" with 5 seconds to go out of the entire 30 minutes, thus resetting the clock. I would then place my new bid almost immediately and the counter bidder would wait until the next 30 minutes were almost up. We went through this dance for a few hours before I finally gave up and went to bed, seeing that I had a 7am meeting the next morning.

I did pick up:

805 Flown STS-51F PDRS Ops Checklist

I did get into it a little deeper than I wanted, but as Jonathan just mentioned in the Regency thread, you need to maybe go a little higher in order to acquire an item you really want. He is right when he says we are "battling" with commercial interests in these auctions and I did not want to see another complete checklist possibly broken apart and sold page by page (like the STS-3 Lousma checklist). This win will ensure the STS-51F checklist will stay complete.

Item 802, the STS-51B Overmyer Flown Entry Checklist, really bothered me seeing that it was only 8 pages long. Granted this is how many pages were present when it was sold in 2003 via Aurora but it should (in my opinion) contain many more pages. Since the checklist was microfilmed by NASA, it would be easy to verify the original number of pages by requesting a copy.

Jurvetson
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From: Menlo Park, CA, United States
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posted 05-28-2013 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jurvetson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The counter bidder may not be confused, but may have more time than money, and it looks like their strategy worked.

Greggy_D
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posted 05-28-2013 02:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greggy_D   Click Here to Email Greggy_D     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steve, strategy or no strategy it was definitely irritating. Regardless, I would not have gone any higher than the final bid I placed.

spaced out
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posted 05-28-2013 04:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The 30 minute rule may work well for those of you in the US but here in mainland Europe it begins at 1am and goes on, potentially, forever.

That said, I do like the RR format overall as it allows you to follow every item through as far as you want to in the bidding and to direct your funds wherever you need to at any time.

In a classic live auction if you have the funds to either buy early lot A or late lot B you have to decide during the live bidding on the early lot how far to go before giving up and gambling on lot B instead. Then you might find lot B goes out of your range. At this point you realise you should have gone higher on lot A but it's too late.

In the classic live format early lots sometimes lose out because people save funds for later purchases and late lots lose out because people run out of funds before the auction gets that far.

These problems are eliminated by the RR format, which is why I prefer it these days to the classic live auctions.

space1
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Posts: 506
From: Danville, Ohio, USA
Registered: Dec 2002

posted 05-29-2013 06:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for space1   Click Here to Email space1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steve (Jurvetson), I was the consignor of the Apollo Block I Control Panel. Thanks for bidding. And I am founder of the Totally Jelly Club for the Lunar Module Translation Control. To me that has to be one of the most intriguing control mechanisms ever made. Congratulations!

racso184
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Posts: 22
From: Katy, Texas
Registered: Aug 2009

posted 05-31-2013 11:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for racso184   Click Here to Email racso184     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I won the Shuttle Strut Set Assembly (Item 774). Does anyone have a photo of the struts in action or know where I could find one in the net? I looked around but I haven't had any luck. I would like to add it to the Set so I can illustrate there use. Can anybody tell me where on the front wheel doors were these located, on the inside or the outside of the doors? When were these used and how? Any information will be helpful. Thanks.

Ken Havekotte
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Posts: 1823
From: Merritt Island, Florida, Brevard
Registered: Mar 2001

posted 06-01-2013 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lot #774, the orbiter strut set, originally came from my collection and let me check on some information that might be able to answer some of your questions. Give me a few days to do so and I'll email you later. I hope you enjoy the strut set assembly components, stored inside the special metal container, which may had been used on the orbiter's nose landing gear door.

racso184
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From: Katy, Texas
Registered: Aug 2009

posted 06-01-2013 07:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for racso184   Click Here to Email racso184     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you Mr. Havekotte for your fast response. I'll be waiting for your email. I am really glad to have a chance to contact you.

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