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Author Topic:   Heritage Galleries October 2009 auction
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-11-2009 03:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Heritage Auction Galleries release
Famed Astronaut James Lovell's Personal, Emotional Gemini 7 Space Log in Auction

Lunar Module-Flown Rolex and Other Space Treasures in Oct. 8 Heritage Auction in Dallas

Gemini 7 pilot James Lovell's personal log, written during his first space flight, Dec. 4-18, 1965, forms the emotional and philosophical centerpiece of Heritage Auction Galleries' Oct. 8 Signature Space Exploration Auction at the company's Uptown Dallas headquarters. The log, which is one of the earliest descriptions of the earth as seen from an orbiting spacecraft, is estimated at $10,000-$12,500.

Few American epochs inspire such fascination and respect as the human quest to set foot on the moon, and there are no more revered American heroes than the first generations of NASA astronauts, whose lives were literally on the line constantly as they wrestled with newly evolving technology to achieve feats dreamed of only in the realm of science fiction a scant few years before. This was serious business, and the original commanders and pilots of the U.S. space program, of necessity, kept their emotions in check, and their feelings to themselves.

During the Gemini 7 mission, however, for a few brief moments Lovell took pencil to paper, let his guard down and gave voice to the stirring of his soul as he gazed at the planet during what was then the longest manned space light (14 days). The result is a moving testament to the transformational nature of space travel that many astronauts would only admit to years after their labors were complete.

"As the acceleration built up, the horizon came into view," Lovell wrote, "Absolutely beautiful - black sky - bright blue band around the horizon and dazzling white clouds... Spacecraft separation accomplished and commencing the turn around... we see sitting majestically behind us - the second stage of the booster. Brilliant silver in the sunshine - venting fuel that forms a million stars around it..."

Heritage Senior Historian and Chief Cataloger Michael Riley, who has personally handled much of the singular space memorabilia that has come through Heritage in the last few years, is as impressed by Lovell's candor as Lovell himself was of the view. "You really never see this side of these men," he said. "This is clearly the thoughts of a man marveling at the glory of the planet and of human achievement."

"I can't get over the beauty of the earth from here," write Lovell. "Sunsets are fantastic - all shades of blue... 0g is amazing - I wonder if I will get used to 1g when I get back to earth? This book just floats in front of me when I let go of it..."

Now an erudite collector will have the chance to own the book that once floated in outer space in front of Lovell. The lot comes with a letter of authenticity from Commander Lovell himself, who has maintained possession of the log since the original flight.

Collectors put a great premium on astronaut-worn wristwatches, especially those that have been to the moon. Most noteworthy are the Omega watches, the official timepiece of the Space Program Accordingly, Apollo 17 Mission Commander Ron Evans' personal Rolex, flown aboard the space craft and brought to the surface aboard to Lunar Module, is expected to generate a great deal of excitement among collectors – particularly as it is one of only two Rolex watches absolutely known to have made it to the moon. It carries an estimate of $60,000-$80,000.

"This watch comes to us directly from the widow of Commander Evans himself," said Riley, "is inscribed by him and, as far as we know, this is only moon flown Rolex that has come up for auction."

Another spectacular lot, directly from the collection of Commander Evans, is an Apollo 17 Lunar Module Flown Spacecraft Identification plate, one of three such plates flown to the moon on Apollo 17 and returned to Grumman Aerospace Corporation. Grumman subsequently presented one ID plate to each crew member of the flight, to this day the very last lunar landing mission. It is estimated at $30,000-$50,000.

A "Mercury Seven" NASA Astronaut Group One photo, signed by all, is bound to have collectors of important early space memorabilia buzzing. This rare photo, featuring the original septet deemed to have "the right stuff," is one of the most sought after of astronaut-signed images. It shows the astronauts inspecting a Mercury Atlas model, and was one of a series of photos taken April 30, 1959, at Langley Research Center. All seven of these brave men who laid the groundwork for America's space program have signed with the earliest forms of their signatures. It is estimated at $7,000-$9,000.

Further Highlights include, but are not limited to:

Heritage Auction Galleries is the world’s third largest auction house, and by far the largest auctioneer of rare collectibles, with annual sales more than $700 million, and 450,000+ registered online bidder members. For more information about Heritage's auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

DOX32
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Posts: 203
From: Fairfax, VA USA
Registered: Jul 2004

posted 09-11-2009 11:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DOX32   Click Here to Email DOX32     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lot 41003 with sheet of Scott 1193, signed by 7. The Alan Shepard signature looks like a classic secretarial (e.g. spiked "P"). It does not look right!

mjanovec
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Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 09-12-2009 09:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by DOX32:
The Alan Shepard signature looks like a classic secretarial (e.g. spiked "P"). It does not look right!

If you choose to read the item description in the auction, it says "the Alan Shepard signature is an early secretarial signature."

DOX32
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Posts: 203
From: Fairfax, VA USA
Registered: Jul 2004

posted 09-12-2009 12:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DOX32   Click Here to Email DOX32     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for the update and correction. At least I recognized it (still learning). What about the rest of the signatures?

stsmithva
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Posts: 1319
From: Centreville, VA, USA
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 09-13-2009 09:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I greatly enjoy Heritage's auctions - they have consistently high-quality, even jaw-dropping lots, and their web page and bidding procedures are top-notch. However, I experience one amusingly unpleasant thing with each of their space auctions. (It's through no fault of Heritage.)

They add lots to a "preview" for several weeks, and I click "Track item" on perhaps a dozen that I am considering bidding on. Then one day the catalog is officially complete... and the minimum bids and estimates appear. That's when I find out that with unerring skill I have picked lots well out of my price range. "Let's take a look and see if - AAAIIEEEE! Well, maybe the next one is - no! NOOOOOO! Perhaps that Apollo 13 piece is - WHY GOD WHY?!?!?!?!" Always good for a chuckle, and weeping.

(Actually I slipped up this time and there are a couple of "tracked" lots I can still try for.)

daveblog
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Posts: 129
From: Bergenfield, NJ USA
Registered: May 2004

posted 09-17-2009 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for daveblog   Click Here to Email daveblog     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The catalog arrived in NJ this morning for this auction.

Spacefest
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Posts: 1056
From: Tucson, AZ USA
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 09-19-2009 6:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacefest   Click Here to Email Spacefest     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone noticed that Heritage Auctions is opening an West Coast office in the same building as Regency-Superior next year?

lunareagle
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Posts: 377
From: Michigan
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-01-2009 07:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunareagle   Click Here to Email lunareagle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, Crunch Time begins!

I see that all the reserves and minimum bid amounts for next Thursday's Space sale have been posted to the Heritage Site as of this evening. I am told that the reserves and minimums seem very low in many cases, which should give many more people the opportunity to acquire some of these great items.

Best of luck to everyone.

davidcwagner
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Posts: 519
From: Albuquerque, New Mexico
Registered: Jan 2003

posted 10-01-2009 11:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for davidcwagner   Click Here to Email davidcwagner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Item 41688: Apollo 17 Flown Still-Sealed Package of Twenty-five Beta Cloth Mission Insignia Patches Directly from the Personal Collection of Mission Command Module Pilot Ron Evans.

WOW! Who will win this one and how will they be marketed? I put my money on Florian Noller. He may get some more of my money depending on the price for an individual flown item. Could they be obtained quickly enough to take to the November show?

Any thoughts?

stsmithva
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Posts: 1319
From: Centreville, VA, USA
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 10-02-2009 05:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That is quite a lot. You're right, a dealer with deep pockets might pick it up with an eye towards individual sales. Usually astronauts are reluctant to certify as flown in space items that are not theirs, but perhaps with the Evans documentation Cernan would sign them as such. Otherwise the individual sales would be problematic, as there is just going to be one set of documents.

lunareagle
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Posts: 377
From: Michigan
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-04-2009 07:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunareagle   Click Here to Email lunareagle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For those who do not know, the ability to place an Internet Bid ends at 10:00 PM Central Time (Wednesday night), which is the evening before the auction goes live (on Thursday).

It is highly recommended that interested bidders place maximum bids before that time so as not to be disappointed by unforeseen events, like computer crashes, disconnects, or just not being available to participate live. By placing a maximum bid, the system will automatically increase your bid if you are out bid on an item until your maximmum bid has been reached.

gliderpilotuk
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Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-05-2009 07:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by stsmithva:
You're right, a dealer with deep pockets might pick it up with an eye towards individual sales.
I've always wondered with lots like this and flown booklets etc that eventually get broken up, whether we should get a group together and cut out the middle-man. Things like the flown checklists would probably work out 50% cheaper, even if the initial capital outlay for 4 or 5 items per person was high, prior to resale of surpluses.

spaced out
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Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 10-05-2009 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very true Paul, but gathering a group of 25 buyers (for this example) would be quite a task.

Not to mention that the most likely buyers/resellers of this lot are already members of CS.

It seems to me that the ideal scenario for this lot would have been for Mrs Evans to take the package to Gene Cernan and for the signed individual patches to then have been sold off via auction or Novaspace/Astro-Auction. That way the mark-up on the individual items would have gone directly to the astronauts / their families.

lunareagle
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Posts: 377
From: Michigan
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-05-2009 01:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunareagle   Click Here to Email lunareagle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What some seem to miss is the incredible idea that this package of beta clothes is still sealed as it was aboard the mission, intact with all tags as such. How many times has the community seen this or been able to acquire something like this. I believe not everyone is thinking about opening it up and trying to profit from the parts. There is no shortage of flown Apollo 17 beta clothes available individually.

If I were to purchase this lot, I for one would be keeping it intact, and I believe that there are a few collectors who may feel the same way. In fact, I also believe that this lot is more valuable unopened because of how unique it is. The buyer might find comfort in the fact that the downside may be known by the fact that he or she can at some point open and sell off individual pieces if needed.

spaced out
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Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 10-05-2009 01:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Obviously the sealed pack has some value as a sealed unit but it was carried with the intention that it be opened and the individual beta cloths distributed. The grouping of 25 identical beta cloths was just a temporary means of carrying them on the mission as souvenirs and has no other significance.

It's completely different to a checklist or other document which was always intended to be kept in one piece and which obviously has more historical significance in its original complete form.

lunareagle
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Posts: 377
From: Michigan
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-07-2009 10:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunareagle   Click Here to Email lunareagle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just one last reminder that your Internet bids need to be placed by 10:00 PM Central Time Tonight. Good Luck to everyone.

From the Heritage site:

After Internet bidding closes, live bidding will take place through www.HA.com/Live. Your secret maximum bid placed prior to the live event will compete against the live bids. To maximize your chances of winning, enter realistic secret maximum bids on our site. Many of our proxy bidders are successful at winning lots in these auctions, and usually below their secret maximum. You can also place last minute bids directly with us by e-mailing Bid@HA.com or calling 1-866-835-3243. (Important note: Due to software and Internet latency, live bids may not register in time, so enter realistic proxy bids.)

spaced out
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Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 10-07-2009 04:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One item that's sure to end up in pieces is the Apollo 16 gaffer tape roll. Make a quick estimate of the length of tape on the roll and imagine it cut into SpaceFlori presentation sized triangles and you'll see there's literally thousands of pieces on the roll.

My bet is there's going to be some very lively bidding on that lot from of our scissor-happy friends.

MadSci
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Posts: 184
From: Maryland, USA
Registered: Oct 2008

posted 10-07-2009 09:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MadSci     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it just me or do the prices for the Armstrong WSS #41076 and 41077 seem reversed?

41076 is a very clear autograph with a simple inscription.
Start: $500 Est: $1,000-$1,500

41077 looks pretty faded and has a longer, barely legible inscription.
Start: $1,250 Est: $2,500-$3,500

MadSci
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Registered: Oct 2008

posted 10-08-2009 05:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MadSci     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Guess I wasn't the only one.
  • Lot #41076 Sold for $1,254 (w BP) and
  • Lot #41077 didn't sell at an opening bid of $1,250

benguttery
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Posts: 542
From: Fort Worth, TX, USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 10-08-2009 06:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for benguttery   Click Here to Email benguttery     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Were there any bargains?

SpaceSteve
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From: San Antonio TX, USA
Registered: Apr 2004

posted 10-08-2009 06:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceSteve   Click Here to Email SpaceSteve     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I picked up a pair of John Young signed covers for just a hair over $500... one from Apollo 16 and one for the first space shuttle launch. Both were also signed by Capt Young on the back as being from his personal collection.

The Apollo 16 cover completes my set of moonwalker-signed covers.

spaceflori
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Posts: 1376
From: Germany
Registered: May 2000

posted 10-08-2009 11:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Amazing prices - both low and high!

Interesting to note that flown flags or beta cloth patches (which are perfectly astronaut certified) went fairly low while the whole set of A17 patches went over 31k which is a bit more than 1k each and they are not even individually certified.

Also autographs went cheaper than in Superior yesterday, mostly.

But isn't that the auction fun?

P.S. no, I didn't buy the A17 patches nor the duct tape.

spaced out
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Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 10-09-2009 01:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah Florian I really thought that was you buying the duct tape. I guess we'll see soon-enough who the real buyer was.

There seemed to be some bargains around, particularly in terms of flown flags and the like, while some other types of item seem to have massive support e.g. a crew-signed Apollo 8 flown Wisconsin state flag presentation at $1,912 vs $16,730 for a Robbins medallion from the same flight.

One real bargain was the Apollo 12 flown razor and shaving cream at $2,629. That's less than many individual Apollo flown embroidered or beta cloth patches sold for.

One item which seemed very expensive to me was John Young's 1981 id card which sold at $3,884. Plenty of items that were flown to the moon sold for less, but I guess to each their own.

As ever, the HA live interface was mightily impressive. Live video/audio, the ability to disable/enable bidding on the fly... for me it was perfect.

gliderpilotuk
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Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-09-2009 03:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaced out:
As ever, the HA live interface was mightily impressive. Live video/audio, the ability to disable/enable bidding on the fly... for me it was perfect.
I agree - a great experience, thanks to the superb technology.

Picked up some real deals: Apollo 7 flown flag for $550 +bp; Apollo 8 crew signed poster $550 and an Apollo 14 flown Swedish flag (for my son) at $1300.

Like Chris I'm staggered that one flown item can go for a fraction of another flown item from the same mission. I picked up the same Wisconsin Apollo 8 flag last year for a similar price.

spaceflori
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Posts: 1376
From: Germany
Registered: May 2000

posted 10-09-2009 05:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Who knows what happens to the duct tape - considering the relation to Apollo 13 as outlined in the description it could be a serious collector realizing the historic importance of such a tape (as simple as it is) who just keeps it intact...

And aside me - who else would want to play Ed Scissorhands anyway.

I think there were some real bargains in the sale and I do believe that the John Young stuff in general can't be praised enough - there aren't too many moonwalkers left anymore with large collections to be disposed and once these astronaut certified items are gone - they are gone.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-09-2009 05:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Top 10 Performing Lots at Heritage Galleries's Oct. 8, 2009 Space Auction
  1. Lot 41170: Apollo 17 Lunar Module Flown Rolex GMT-Master Chronometer


    Credit: Heritage Auction Galleries

    This handsome, all-original, 1968-era Rolex Oyster Perpetual GMT-Master was Apollo 17 Astronaut Ron Evans' personal watch. He placed it into his Personal Preference Kit (PPK) which was taken to the moon by his crewmates Gene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt aboard the Lunar Module Challenger, while he orbited the moon in the Command Module America. It remained on the moon for approximately seventy-five hours on what, up to this day, was the last manned lunar landing mission.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $131,450

  2. Lot 41152: Apollo 16 Lunar Module Flown Crewman Optical Alignment Sight

    One of the most impressive and important pieces of precision lunar module-flown equipment we've handled. Its overall dimensions are 8.75" x 4.25" x 3" and it weighs more than 1.5 pounds.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $65,725

  3. Lot 41055: Apollo 8 Flown Crew Log

    This 130+ page, 5.5" x 8", Crew Log book is printed on cardstock and bound with three binder rings between two heavyweight covers. Lovell has written his surname on the front cover, almost certainly contemporary to the period.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $56,762.50

  4. Lot 41178: Apollo Guidance Computer: Original Display and Keyboard

    A fifteen pound, 8" x 8" x 6.5" Raytheon-manufactured data entry and display device with nineteen keys and a twenty-one digit display. A unit like this was mounted into the control panel of each lunar module and two were found in each command module.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $50,787.50

  5. Lot 41147: Apollo 16 Lunar Module Flown Landing Site Map

    A 10.5" x 7.5" B&W printed lunar surface map, number twenty-one of the twenty-four maps used aboard the Lunar Module Orion for navigation to their landing site which is shown on this very map.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $33,460

  6. Lot 41168: Apollo 17 Flown Still-Sealed Package of 25 Beta Cloth Patches

    Still enclosed in two heavy plastic bags, one approximately 12" x 10" inside another of approximately 14" x 12", are twenty-five color Apollo 17 mission insignia printed on Beta cloth swatches of approximately 9" x 9".

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $31,070

  7. Lot 41169: Apollo 17 Lunar Module Flown Spacecraft Identification Plate

    Three of these Lunar Module 12 Identification Plates were flown to the moon on Apollo 17 and returned to Grumman who then presented one ID plate to each crewmember. Of the twelve LMs completed by Grumman, nine were used on manned missions, six of which were moon landings.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $31,070

  8. Lot 41208: Russian Soyuz Flown Sokol KV-2 Pressurized Spacesuit

    A complete crew "rescue" suit including helmet, avionics, gloves, boots, and slip-ons, as made by Zvedza for Soyuz cosmonauts. This model was first used on Soyuz T-2 in 1980 and is still in use today during launch and descent.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $31,070

  9. Lot 41091: Apollo 11 Flown American Flag, Crew-Signed

    A 5.75" x 3.75" silk U.S. flag mounted to a 10" x 12" color certificate printed with the words: "This Flag Traveled to the Moon with Apollo 11, the First Manned Lunar Landing, July 20, 1969/ APOLLO 11/ July 16-24, 1969/ Armstrong - Collins - Aldrin".

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $23,900

  10. Lot 41148: Apollo 16 Lunar Module Flown Star Chart and G&N Dictionary

    Not one, but two important objects that spent three days on the moon in the Lunar Module Orion during the flight of Apollo 16, April 16-27, 1972 with crewmembers John Young, Ken Mattingly, and Charlie Duke.

    Sold for (including buyer's premium): $22,705

lunareagle
Member

Posts: 377
From: Michigan
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-12-2009 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunareagle   Click Here to Email lunareagle     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As of now there are still 29 items that remain from the Thursday sale that can be purchased outright at the opening low bid.

HeritageSpace
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posted 10-30-2009 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HeritageSpace   Click Here to Email HeritageSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The date has been set for the next Heritage Auctions Space Exploration sale: April 21, 2010. We already have some awesome astronaut-owned material in-house. Thanks to all who made our recent auction such a success.

------------------
Michael Riley
Chief Cataloger- Space
Heritage Auctions
www.HA.com
MichaelR@HA.com
1-800-872-6467 x1467

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