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  [Discuss] SpaceX Crew Dragon Demo-1 mission (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] SpaceX Crew Dragon Demo-1 mission
Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-08-2019 01:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Crew Dragon undocked from the International Space Station at 2:32 a.m. EST (0732 GMT) on Friday (March 8) as scheduled. Expedition 58 flight engineer Anne McClain radioed the following after the Crew Dragon departed:
As Crew Dragon departs the International Space Station, we want to take a moment to recognize this milestone accomplishment that marked the inaugural mission of the commercial crew program. Fifty years after humans landed on the moon for the first time, America has driven a golden spike on the trail to new space exploration feats through the work of our commercial partner SpaceX and all the talented and dedicated flight controllers at NASA and our international partners.

It won't be long before our astronaut colleagues are aboard Crew Dragon and Boeing's Starliner vehicle and we can't wait. Let us continue to be united by insatiable curiosity to go beyond what is known, to do what has never been done. We humans are at our best when we are part of something bigger than ourselves. Today, tomorrow and the weeks and months ahead belong to those who dream big and who dare to explore and our future in space is very, very bright.

A 15-minute, 20-second deorbit burn is expected at 7:53 a.m. EST, leading to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean at 8:45 a.m. EST (1345 GMT).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-08-2019 07:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Splashdown at 8:45 a.m. EST (1345 GMT), 50 years (less 5 days) since the last time a spacecraft landed in the Atlantic Ocean (Apollo 9 on March 13, 1969).

Madon_space
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posted 03-08-2019 08:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Madon_space   Click Here to Email Madon_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Absolutely amazing to watch and when them parachutes deployed. Wow what an amazing view.

Congratulations to all involved.

ea757grrl
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posted 03-08-2019 08:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ea757grrl   Click Here to Email ea757grrl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Absolutely beautiful to see. What times we live in!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-08-2019 09:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Crew Dragon aboard the Go Searcher recovery ship:

Blackarrow
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posted 03-08-2019 09:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Excellent news! Well done to all.

I hope it will not be seen as a criticism, even an oblique one, if I dare to suggest that SpaceX appears to have reinvented the Saturn 1B/Apollo for Earth orbital activities. There are some obvious comparisons between Falcon 9 and Saturn 1B (9 first-stage engines versus 8; roughly comparable thrust, etc) although 50 years of rocket-development has allowed a much cheaper, more versatile and largely reusable rocket. One obvious difference is that the payload is different: Apollo was designed to go to the Moon and was underutilised in Earth orbit, whereas Dragon was designed to support ISS crew transfer operations.

Anyway, it's good to see that the USA seems on the threshold of resuming orbital activities. I was going to say "routine" orbital activities, but I suppose, at least in the short to medium term it will never quite be "routine" to launch into space.

cspg
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posted 03-08-2019 09:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ea757grrl:
Absolutely beautiful to see. What times we live in!
Really? I must have missed something. We've seen this in the 1960s-70s.

SkyMan1958
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posted 03-08-2019 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it just me, or does it seem that the Dragon 2 capsule looks a whole lot more charred than the Dragon 1 capsules do after they've returned?

In any case, congratulations to SpaceX, NASA and the American taxpayer for a job well done...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-08-2019 11:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Crew Dragon has a different hypersonic flight profile due to its asymmetric shape, which may account for the difference in scorch patterns.

SkyMan1958
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posted 03-08-2019 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you for the info Robert!
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
We've seen this in the 1960s-70s.
Last I heard tell that was the USA flying spacecraft that landed in the ocean in the 1960s-70s.

This is a commercial company launching, flying and landing their own spacecraft. That is something that only countries have done in the past. Granted SpaceX had a significant chunk of government funding, but so did the railroad companies that built the transcontinental railroad in the 1800s, that allowed the US to open up the western frontier.

ea757grrl
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posted 03-08-2019 04:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ea757grrl   Click Here to Email ea757grrl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
This is a commercial company launching, flying and landing their own spacecraft.
Thank you for posting this, and for understanding the sentiment behind my comment. The flight profile might have seemed routine or even boring, but the implications of the Demo-1 mission are exciting — as is the number of other firms getting into the business. And on top of that, what I saw today was just plain cool, and nothing can take away the wonder I felt watching it.

Aeropix
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posted 03-09-2019 01:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aeropix   Click Here to Email Aeropix     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
We've seen this in the 1960s-70s.
I have to agree. 60 years after the Wright brothers flight we landed on the moon, 15 years later we were launching airliners into orbit. Fast forward another 40 years and we are back to Gemini era tech, with upgraded avionics. We haven't even managed to catch up to Soviet cold-war tech so we can land on solid ground? Well, let's see how the Boeing offering does, at least that will bring us up to the Soyuz era and land in the USA.

Aeropix
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posted 03-09-2019 01:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aeropix   Click Here to Email Aeropix     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
This is a commercial company launching, flying and landing their own spacecraft.
Yes, but the rockets and vehicles were always built by aerospace companies, though. NASA or other governments were never the fabricators, they just laid out the specifications.

That being said, I'm excited to see that SpaceX can use this as a jumping off point and seems to be keeping up with some momentum. Something that NASA has always lacked. Maybe by "starting over" at this Gemini/Apollo stepping stone we can get some real advancements in the next 20 years.

oly
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posted 03-09-2019 02:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congratulations to SpaceX for achieving the first flight of Crew Dragon to the ISS. I have followed the progress of this vehicle with interest from the beginning and cannot wait to see the first manned mission for a private company.

I must admit that while the sight of four inflated parachutes lowering the Crew Dragon down to the ocean surface made an inspirational signal of mission success, I would prefer to see a powered landing as originally designed.

The use of parachutes and a flotilla of support vessels somehow does not complete the original image of a rapid reusable vehicle, however this in no way detracts from the achievement of a single manufacturer designing, building and flying a potentially man rated system on this first test flight.

cspg
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posted 03-09-2019 02:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
This is a commercial company launching, flying and landing their own spacecraft.
A commercial company whose spacecraft solely depends on the ISS — a government-funded project. If there were private space stations, maybe I would be more enthusiastic (or less critical) but such stations are only on the drawing board. And if you take the ISS out of the picture — something that could happen at any time —  where would Crew Dragon and Starliner go? Probably in a museum, somewhere.

SkyMan1958
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posted 03-09-2019 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
If there were private space stations, maybe I would be more enthusiastic (or less critical) but such stations are only on the drawing board.
I highly doubt you could get the private space stations without the private transport to the private space stations. In my opinion, this is the start of something, not the end of it.

Also, as an American, I'm glad that the USA will again have manned access to space. For myself, and I suspect for many other Americans, it's sucked to have to use Russia for manned access to space. I'm also looking forward to the Atlas switching out to US built engines in the relatively near future. Further, by having two companies' systems, there is the ability to launch even if there's a catastrophic failure on one of the systems.

oly
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posted 03-10-2019 01:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What both the SpaceX and Boeing vehicles will provide more than anything else is options. Options providing the ability to fly to and from the ISS at a self determined schedule, without having to rely on a third party. The option to fly multiple crew members, for durations longer than what is available at present.

The option to fly to another LEO destination, including any private space station.

SpaceX's successful test of the automated docking system now gives the US the option of launching and assembling modules autonomously, negating the requirement for a crewed flight to deliver components on orbit, and subsequent crewed missions could conduct any on station work that may be required. Options such as the Skylab 1 rescue mission come to mind.

I do not know if either system is capable of visiting Hubble, if so, some kind of on orbit servicing platform could be constructed and combined with a manned vehicle to conduct Hubble type servicing missions to on orbit assets may become an option.

SpaceX, as a commercial launch provider, have stated that they will explore their options once their commitment to crewed ISS missions has been met. Whatever commercial agreements develop in the future will be of great interest to many space enthusiasts.

I for one would like to see some kind of commercial space station develop that is made up from used rocket stages. I believe that a LEO workshop and laboratory that can act as a stage platform/repair or modification workshop for existing high value satellites, that can be used to extend the service life of space hardware, is something that should be tried out.

Another used could be as a collection and consolidation depot for dead hardware, that could be removed from orbit and safely disposed of by either salvage or safe reentry. This all may seem somewhat far fetched, but the options for private companies or NASA to try some of these things becomes more realistic with once SpaceX bring their Crew Dragon on line.

SpaceX also have the option of making the Falcon Heavy a man-rated vehicle that could carry the Crew Dragon and a long duration service module to deeper space destinations. While SpaceX are focusing efforts on the BFG iteration, and have not show any intention of following this route, it remains an option while the Falcon fleet remain within the SpaceX family.

For me, the significance of this Crew Dragon Demo-1 mission is that this is the first vehicle, capable of manned flight to LEO, that has been manufactured by a single company, in house, for private use. Raw materials enter one end of the factory, and a manned, LEO capable vehicle comes out the other. This is a first for a US company.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-10-2019 05:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by oly:
Options providing the ability to fly to and from the ISS at a self determined schedule, without having to rely on a third party. The option to fly multiple crew members, for durations longer than what is available at present.
All visiting vehicles to the International Space Station are constrained by the activities aboard the orbiting laboratory, including other vehicle schedules and crew time. The launch schedule is decided by all partners. NASA, nor any of the other partners, can set its own schedule without the agreement of the others.

Similarly, Dragon's (and Starliner's) crew complement will be constrained by the need to fly other partners' crew members (just as each Soyuz going forward will have at least one USOS crew member). Crew rotation schedules also require the agreement of the international partners.

quote:
SpaceX's successful test of the automated docking system now gives the US the option of launching and assembling modules autonomously...
The international docking standard was developed by NASA and the partners in the space station, such that the U.S. space agency already had the hardware design for that capability. The software required to execute an autonomous docking is proprietary to SpaceX (as is Boeing's separately-developed system). NASA does not have automatic use of that software.

denali414
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posted 03-10-2019 08:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In my opinion, this is just the beginning step stone in a long journey. The ISS has already showed a huge and growing market for microgravity experiments and products and just the pharmacy applications is a multibillion industry that will make a private space station very viable. Both SpaceX and Boeing will be the beneficiaries of this.

The 2018 Annual Report also highlights additional key accomplishments of the ISS National Lab, including the following:

  • More than $150 million in external, non-NASA funds are now invested in ISS National Lab research—a 50% increase in fiscal year 2018.
  • The ISS National Lab selected 50 new projects and programs in fiscal year 2018, the strongest year to date for portfolio growth.
  • In fiscal year 2018, 74 payloads were delivered to the ISS National Lab, carrying multiple projects and investigations across a diverse subset of science disciplines.
  • During the 2018 fiscal year, 17 new publications were released from ISS National Lab-sponsored investigators, along with three patents granted related to ISS National Lab research.
And on Keytruda specifically:
Many cancer drugs, such as Keytruda, are large biological molecules in dilute solutions that must be given through a slow intravenous infusion. However, if the drugs could be formulated as concentrated crystalline suspensions, it may be possible to deliver them as a quick injection under the skin, significantly benefiting patients’ comfort and recovery. Results from Merck’s investigation, which launched on SpaceX CRS-10 in February 2017, could also lead to improvements in the drug purification process and in drug storage.

oly
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posted 03-11-2019 12:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
All visiting vehicles to the International Space Station are constrained by the activities aboard the orbiting laboratory, including other vehicle schedules and crew time.
Thanks Robert. I understand the planning for launch schedules that are required for the ISS operations. The point I was trying to make is that with the Crew Dragon and Boeing vehicles, the US has the option of flying in a slot that suits their specific timeline, rather than having to fit into the launch schedule of third party.
quote:
The international docking standard was developed by NASA and the partners in the space station, such that the U.S. space agency already had the hardware design for that capability. The software required to execute an autonomous docking is proprietary to SpaceX
SpaceX proving that their half of the system is compatible and functions correctly with the other half installed on the ISS, now gives the US the option of using such a system to their own advantage. Yes, SpaceX would need to be contracted to provide the service, unless they sold the option to use, but the option of using the system is now available to the US.

Whatever these new capabilities are put to use over, the Crew Dragon Demo-1 mission proved that the US now has more options available.

bdipaolo
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posted 03-11-2019 08:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bdipaolo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX rocks. American manned space program back in business!


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