Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Commercial Space - Military Space
  [Discuss] SpaceX Falcon Heavy maiden launch (Page 5)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 5 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   [Discuss] SpaceX Falcon Heavy maiden launch
damnyankee36
Member

Posts: 24
From: Alamogordo, NM USA
Registered: Aug 2017

posted 02-08-2018 01:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for damnyankee36   Click Here to Email damnyankee36     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm going to guess the car will remain attached to the second stage? It seems like this might be the case as they made big deal of the signatures on the adapter the car is attached to. It would make sense to keep the two together.

damnyankee36
Member

Posts: 24
From: Alamogordo, NM USA
Registered: Aug 2017

posted 02-08-2018 01:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for damnyankee36   Click Here to Email damnyankee36     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
...the Roadster will not travel out to the asteroid belt, but go just past Mars orbit.
Has anybody calculated the predictions on when it will be back in our neighborhood?

I use the "Starry Night" software for future astronomical events. Is there any way to input the data into the program? I guess I could check to see if I could download some updates that might include this data.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-08-2018 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bill Harwood, reporting for CBS, wrote about the Roadster's journey based on the orbital data shared by SpaceX with Jonathan McDowell.
It will pass within about 69 million miles of Mars on June 8 and cross the red planet's orbit in July before reaching its farthest distance from the sun — about 158 million miles — on Nov. 19.

After that, the Roadster and Starman will fall back toward the inner solar system, picking up speed as they near the low point of the orbit, or perihelion, on Sept. 1, 2019. Perihelion in this case roughly matches the distance of Earth's orbit from the sun, the Tesla's starting point. The Roadster then will head back out along the same path, traveling a now-familiar route over and over again for the foreseeable future.

That gives the timeline, but doesn't answer if Earth will be anywhere near where the Roadster next crosses our planet's 1 AU orbit.

The Roadster has been added to JPL's Horizons — target body -143205 — which may help with answering that question.

quote:
Originally posted by damnyankee36:
It would make sense to keep the two together.
Yes, the Roadster and the second stage are still and forever mated.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 2256
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 02-08-2018 02:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One of my engineers found this orbital diagram on Wikipedia.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 2256
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 02-10-2018 05:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Elon Musk said it cost SpaceX more than $500 million to develop the Falcon Heavy...

I am assuming that is the cost on top of the money already spent on the Falcon 9 vehicle development and launch infrastructure.

holcombeyates
Member

Posts: 190
From: UK
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 02-10-2018 06:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for holcombeyates   Click Here to Email holcombeyates     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Teslas don't weigh as much as the full payload that the Heavy can carry, so where is the rest of the mass? Just the rocket stage as well?

JBoe
Member

Posts: 876
From: Churchton, MD
Registered: Oct 2012

posted 02-10-2018 10:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just saw this Yahoo article questioning the recovery of the core stage. Can anyone confirm whether the booster was towed back or recovery of any pieces after a possible bombing/airstrike by US military?

According to Musk's twitter of the core stage, all the recovery in the water was planned. What is the question is the retrieval of the booster by watercraft either towed or sunk by the military.

denali414
Member

Posts: 197
From: Raleigh, NC USA
Registered: Aug 2017

posted 02-10-2018 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That was for SpaceX's other launch on Jan. 31, not the Falcon Heavy/Tesla launch. The core of the Jan. 31st launch was a water landing.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-10-2018 12:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The following statement was provided to Florida Today from SpaceX:
While the Falcon 9 first stage for the GovSat-1 mission was expendable, it initially survived splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean. However, the stage broke apart before we could complete an unplanned recovery effort for this mission.

Reports that the Air Force was involved in SpaceX's recovery efforts are categorically false.

The center core from the Falcon Heavy launch was intended to land on the droneship but failed. The droneship is now back at the port.

teopze
Member

Posts: 171
From: Warsaw, Poland
Registered: May 2008

posted 02-10-2018 05:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for teopze   Click Here to Email teopze     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just thought that this video gives a pretty unique perspective on the recent FH launch.

spaceheaded
Member

Posts: 134
From: MD
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-10-2018 07:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceheaded     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw that the other day and enjoyed it, too. Loved seeing the inside of the VAB from different perspectives. And of course the focusing in on the sound aspects of a launch was great.

Wish that guy had been around for the Saturn V launches. I saw Apollo 17 from Titusville and whenever I retell the story, my main point is about the sound that could be felt! Thanks for posting.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-10-2018 08:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Geographic has released footage they shot for the second season of "MARS" showing Elon Musk witnessing the Falcon Heavy launch.
"Holy flying f--k, that thing took off," Musk exclaimed. Moments later, he and SpaceX staffers ran out the door of the launch control center and turned their gazes upward. "Look at that! That's unreal!" Musk cried out.

holcombeyates
Member

Posts: 190
From: UK
Registered: Dec 2010

posted 02-11-2018 05:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for holcombeyates   Click Here to Email holcombeyates     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think it would have been fun to have had a second spacesuited figure in the passenger seat. That famous red spacesuit worn by the crew of Discovery in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Solarplexus
Member

Posts: 84
From: Norway
Registered: Jan 2014

posted 02-11-2018 03:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Solarplexus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Astronomers found Starman and the Tesla Roadster.

spaced out
Member

Posts: 2997
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 02-11-2018 05:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This video of the two side cores landing taken from a distance is pretty impressive — seeing them drop in so fast and then hearing the sonic booms and the sound of the engines...

oly
Member

Posts: 285
From: Perth, Western Australia
Registered: Apr 2015

posted 02-12-2018 01:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have looked at this video previously and I am curious where this was shot?

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 2256
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 02-12-2018 04:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Based on the LC-34 that is seen in the foreground I think it would be LC-37 or the Delta IV launch area that is just north of the LC-34.

cspg
Member

Posts: 5845
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 02-14-2018 03:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tesla cars and SpaceX as viewed by Swiss cartoonist Chapatte in the New York Times (14 February 2018).

Paul78zephyr
Member

Posts: 653
From: Hudson, MA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 02-14-2018 01:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul78zephyr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by teopze:
I just thought that this video gives a pretty unique perspective on the recent FH launch.
I had not noticed this in other videos of the FH launch but in this video (posted by teopze above) just after launch (at approximately 3:31 in the video) the booster closest as viewed appears to have a small plume on its left side (as viewed). As the FH accelerates (at 3:42+ in the video) the plume appears to disappear.

I am trying to understand if this is a turbopump exhaust plume or some type of steering vernier or anomaly? If normal would this plume be apparent on Falcon 9 (non-heavy) launches?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-18-2018 09:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One of the Falcon Heavy's two recovered boosters has been put on brief temporary display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in front of the Space Shuttle Atlantis building for this week's National Space Council meeting.

Below photo credit Stephen C. Smith on Twitter, where he also posted two video walkarounds: 1 | 2.

Update: From Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex on Twitter:

Calling all SpaceX fans! For the next few days, a recycled first stage Falcon9 rocket that launched and landed on two SpaceX missions, including Falcon Heavy, will be on display in front of Space Shuttle Atlantis at Kennedy Space Center!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-18-2018 01:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Elon Musk on Twitter:
I'm sure it's parked around here somewhere... whereisroadster.com

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 2256
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 02-19-2018 02:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Heading to KSC in the morning to get a first hand view of this.

OV-105
Member

Posts: 789
From: Ridgecrest, CA
Registered: Sep 2000

posted 02-19-2018 02:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is the booster on the shuttle transport?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-19-2018 03:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, SpaceX purchased the Orbiter Transporter System (OTS) in 2014.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-20-2018 10:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. Air Force Space Command release
Tracking the billion year road trip

Cruising with the windows down, music up and the Sun shining on your face. Going on a road trip is an adventure that some people love or aspire to do. For one individual, their road trip could last a billion years, and the 18th Space Control Squadron is tracking it.

His name is Starman, and he's currently cruising through our solar system in a bright red car. He's got one hand on the steering wheel and the other resting on the door while David Bowie's "Space Oddity" blasts from his radio. The Sun is a constant light shining on him during his journey, and the first stop on his adventure is a fly-by of Mars, then a visit to the beginning of the asteroid belt before returning to Mars in an elliptical orbit. A sign on his dashboard reads, "Don't panic!"

Starman is not really a man, however, but rather a dummy in one of SpaceX's new space suits.

SpaceX launched their Falcon Heavy rocket on Feb. 6, 2018, which is now the most powerful launch vehicle in operation in the world. SpaceX owner and CEO, Elon Musk, said in an interview with a national news network, "Test vehicles usually carry concrete or steel blocks, but that would be extremely boring. We decided to send something unusual, something that made us feel."

That choice was Musk's own personal car, with Starman onboard.

Enter the mission of the 18th SPCS located at Vandenberg Air Force base, California, a geographically separated unit of the 21st Operations Group, 21st Space Wing, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. Their mission is to maintain the satellite catalog by processing observations of objects launched into space, currently on orbit, or re-entering the Earth's atmosphere, including more than 1,400 active objects and 22,000 pieces of debris.

As objects in space orbit the Earth, like a bright red car, three Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep-Space Surveillance Sites, or GEODSS, collect positional and photometric data said Maj. Erin Salinas, Detachment 1 commander, 20th Space Control Squadron.

"We have to know where things are in space in order to know what is going on around us," Salinas said. "Our data helps maintain the advantages space is providing us, in not just our everyday life as civilians, but with our military capabilities as well."

As Flacon Heavy left Earth's atmosphere and delivered its payload into orbit, the GEODSS track its position. The car's positional data is then relayed to the 18th SPCS and they assign it a catalog number. Diana McKissock, 18th Space Control Squadron Spaceflight Safety and SSA Sharing Flight Lead, says you can see this information on Space-Track.org.

"The car's number is 43205, named 'TESLA ROADSTER/FALCON 9H' in the satellite catalog," said McKissock.

Far above the world, floating in a peculiar way, Starman sits in a tin can. There's nothing he can do with Earth looking blue in his rear-view mirror, but the men and women of the 21st Space Wing are tracking his journey. A testament to the abilities of our space situational awareness mission and the Airmen that bring space superiority to the fight every day.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 2256
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 02-20-2018 10:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GACspaceguy:
Heading to KSC in the morning to get a first hand view of this.
Made it here, a little cleaning and good to go. Amazing that just two weeks ago we saw this launch and land!

The people here are saying it is moving out Wednesday night-Thursday morning time frame.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 39034
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-10-2018 06:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Elon Musk on Twitter:
Why Falcon Heavy & Starman?

Life cannot just be about solving one sad problem after another. There need to be things that inspire you, that make you glad to wake up in the morning and be part of humanity. That is why we did it. We did for you.

The video, edited by Jonathan Nolan (Christopher Nolan's brother) debuted at SXSW on Saturday (March 10).

dss65
Member

Posts: 1069
From: Sandpoint, ID, USA
Registered: Mar 2003

posted 03-10-2018 07:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dss65   Click Here to Email dss65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pretty darned cool.


This topic is 5 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 2018 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement