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  [Discuss] SpaceX Falcon Heavy heavy-lift rocket

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] SpaceX Falcon Heavy heavy-lift rocket
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 38503
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-01-2011 09:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please use this topic to discuss SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket, the company's entry into the heavy-lift launch vehicle category.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38503
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-01-2011 09:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX has been teasing on its website that "Something Big is Coming" on April 5. They also posted a teaser video...

It appears the announcement relates to their Falcon Heavy, which SpaceX describes as follows:

The Falcon Heavy will be SpaceX’s entry into the heavy lift launch vehicle category. Capable of lifting over 32,000 kg to Low Earth Orbit (LEO), and over 19,500 kg to Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO), the Falcon Heavy will compete with the largest commercial launchers now available. It consists of a standard Falcon 9 with two additional Falcon 9 first stages acting as liquid strap-on boosters. With the Falcon 9 first stage already designed to support the additional loads of this configuration and with common tanking and engines across both vehicles, development and operation of the Falcon Heavy will be highly cost-effective.
  • Length: 54.9 m (180 ft)
  • Width: 3.6 m (12 ft)
  • Mass: 885,000 kg (1,950 klb)
  • Thrust on liftoff: 15 MN (3,375 klbf)

SpaceAholic
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Posts: 4065
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-05-2011 11:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Falcon Heavy will carry more payload to orbit or escape velocity than any vehicle in history, apart from the Saturn V moon rocket, which was decommissioned after the Apollo program.
In addition to the Saturn V, the Energia had a higher rated payload to orbit and lunar insertion...

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 38503
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-27-2015 01:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX on Twitter:
Updated animation of Falcon Heavy flight and booster recovery.

cspg
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Posts: 5751
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 01-27-2015 02:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
To all Florida residents: Incoming Missiles!

More seriously, what happens if one goes off track and "lands" where it wasn't supposed to?

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 01-27-2015 02:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The same thing that happens if a rocket veers off course during launch, i.e. flight termination.

SpaceX's proposed landing site at the Cape is Complex 13, which is located away from populated areas. A recent environmental assessment noted:

Should there be a need to activate the FTS, it would occur over the open ocean and would result in a much smaller explosion and less debris.

...an anomaly on the landing pads such as an explosion could injure or kill wildlife found adjacent to the launch pad or within debris impact areas. However payloads would not be involved and the fuel load would be substantially less than a typical launch.

An improbable mishap from downrange would occur over the open ocean and would not likely jeopardize any wildlife, given the relatively low density of species within the surface waters of these open ocean areas. Debris from launch failures has a small potential to adversely affect managed fish species and their habitats in the vicinity of the project area.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 38503
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-28-2016 06:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX:
When Falcon Heavy flies for the first time next year, it will be the most powerful operational rocket in the world by a factor of two. Here's an FH interstage being prepped at the rocket factory recently.

Paul78zephyr
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Posts: 637
From: Hudson, MA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 08-03-2017 08:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul78zephyr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has LZ-1 been upgraded to add additional booster landing pads and are there any aerial pics of the new configuration? (Google Maps still shows only the one pad.)

And when the Falcon Heavy boosters return to land at LZ-1 do they land at exactly the same time? (Based on this SpaceX video they will land simultaneously.)

All times are CT (US)

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