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  [Discuss] Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft
Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 08-03-2012 09:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please use this topic to discuss The Boeing Company's development of its CST-100 spacecraft as a part of NASA's commercial crew program.

SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
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posted 09-08-2013 10:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Have learned through some local governmental officials that a dry lake bed here in our county not to far from where I reside (the Wilcox Playa) is being seriously considered by NASA and Boeing as a recovery location for the CST-100.

Inquiries have gone out to the hospital, law enforcement and public safety agencies to determine what level of organic support can be provided and what will need to be brought in by stakeholders. 2017 was cited as when ops will commence at the Playa.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-30-2014 04:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing video release
Boeing Unveils America's First Space Taxi, Unlocks Possibilities for Future

Imagine flying in America's first space taxi, seeing Earth fade into the distance. Boeing is revolutionizing space travel and is one step closer to making it possible for you to experience previously what only astronauts could: space travel.

See more Boeing innovations at buildingsomethingbetter.com.

Lou Chinal
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posted 10-08-2014 05:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any proposal for duration of the first mission? Crew size?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-08-2014 05:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing has said it is too early to discuss the details of their first uncrewed or crewed test flights.

The only NASA requirement for the crewed demo is that it carry at least one NASA astronaut and that it reaches the space station.

Headshot
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posted 10-10-2014 06:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can anyone tell me what the differences will be between the CST-100 and Orion spacecraft?

I know the CST-100 will operate in LEO and the Orion will venture into deep space, but what are the physical/engineering/technical characteristics (besides different "heat shields") to make one suitable for LEO and the other for deep space? GNC systems? Propulsion? ECS?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-10-2014 06:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
D. All of the above. But to offer one specific example:

CST-100 is equipped with batteries and, to meet NASA's requirements, solar cells lining its bottom, such that it only has enough electricity reserves to reach the space station.

Orion is equipped with batteries as well, but its service module is also outfitted with large solar arrays to generate the electricity needed for longer journeys into space.

Lou Chinal
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posted 10-13-2014 11:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was stated that a 12 inch-wide model about 1/14 the size was used for wind tunnel tests. That would mean the CST-100 is 14 feet or 168 inches in diameter? Artists, model builders, graphic designers want to get the scale right.

I have scoured Boeing's website for dimensions. Am I missing something?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-27-2015 02:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Boeing on Twitter:
Upper and lower domes that will form Pressure Shell for CST-100 structural tests arrive at NASA Kennedy.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-16-2016 09:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From NASA Langley Research Center:
CST-100 Starliner is readied for landing tests at NASA Langley.

SkyMan1958
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posted 08-18-2016 01:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm a little surprised about the testing of the RL10 engines and that the engine produces "22,300 pounds of thrust" and that only two will be used on the upper stage of the Atlas V to launch the CST-100.

This would give the upper stage 44,600 pounds of thrust, which seems low. Is the upper stage of the Atlas V really only going to produce 44,600 pounds of thrust?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-18-2016 03:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, a dual engine Centaur generates 44,600 lbf.

Atlas V has capability to spare to launch Starliner missions to low Earth orbit.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-03-2017 05:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jim Chilton, president of Boeing's Network & Space Systems, speaking today (April 3, 2017) at the Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, said they have achieved the first power-up of spacecraft no. 1 for the CST-100 Starliner.
We did achieve first power up of spacecraft no. 1. So we've built her, we've got the wires in, we've got in the avionics in.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-29-2017 06:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Per Chris Ferguson via Twitter:
So what does a fleet of spacecraft under construction look like? Starliner — coming soon to a Galaxy near you.

Headshot
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posted 12-04-2017 11:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If there is to be a fleet of Boeing spacecraft, how will they be differentiated from each other? Will they be stuck with boring Spacecraft 1, Spacecraft 2, etc. designations or will they be assigned individual names?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-04-2017 11:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing hasn't announced how the individual spacecraft will be designated, though they did name their first training mockup the "ColbertOne."

Jim Behling
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posted 12-04-2017 08:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Headshot:
...how will they be differentiated from each other?
There will always be tail numbers. Names are for the public, workers use tail numbers.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-04-2018 03:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Boeing on Twitter:
Check out the Starliner Pad Abort Test and Orbital Flight Test vehicles under construction!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-09-2018 12:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The crew module and service module for the Starliner pad abort test have been mated. From Chris Ferguson on Twitter:
And the two become one... Launch Pad Abort Test is next.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-23-2018 02:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing 360-degree video
One, two, three Boeing CST-100 Starliners are coming together inside this historic spacecraft factory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The goal of the commercially developed and operating spacecraft is to return crew launch capabilities to NASA and the United States.

Headshot
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posted 06-03-2018 05:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Headshot   Click Here to Email Headshot     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has Boeing released any diagrams of the cockpit displays the crew will see during a Starliner mission?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-03-2018 05:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing considers the layout of the displays and controls to be proprietary, so while there have been some photos from oblique angles, no detailed views (or diagrams) have been published. NASA has agreed to restrict such views, too.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-08-2018 02:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Boeing on Twitter:
Simulated spaceship, real results. Boeing, NASA and U.S. Army teams aced their first Starliner landing and recovery drills this week at White Sands Missile Range. We're getting ready to bring NASA astronauts home safely from the International Space Station!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-21-2018 02:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In late June, an anomaly occurred during preparations for Boeing's test of the Starliner spacecraft and its launch abort system, reports Ars Technica.
The company said it conducted a hot-fire test of the launch-abort engines on an integrated service module at the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico in June. The engines successfully ignited and ran for the full duration, but during engine shutdown an anomaly occurred that resulted in a propellant leak. "We have been conducting a thorough investigation with assistance from our NASA and industry partners," the statement said. "We are confident we found the cause and are moving forward with corrective action. Flight safety and risk mitigation are why we conduct such rigorous testing, and anomalies are a natural part of any test program."

The pad abort test is a necessary part of certifying spacecraft for flight, as it ensures the ability of the spacecraft to pull rapidly away from its rocket in the event of an emergency during liftoff or ascent into space.

Boeing officials have apparently told NASA they believe there is an operational fix to the problem rather than a need to significantly rework the Starliner spacecraft itself. Boeing is already deep into production of two more Starliner vehicles — one that will undertake an uncrewed "Orbital Flight Test" for NASA's commercial crew program, perhaps late this year, as well as the spacecraft that will fly the "Crew Flight Test" sometime in 2019. One source indicated that this problem may not affect the uncrewed test flight but that it could delay the crew test.

oly
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posted 07-21-2018 09:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
first Starliner landing and recovery drills
This photo looks like an off road vehicle club day out.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-29-2018 10:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Eric Boe shared a photo of himself inside the Starliner that he will fly aboard:
Being a part of the first full-up acceptance test is an awesome experience! Avionics and subsystems are solid. Nice work by the Boeing Starliner team.

oly
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posted 08-29-2018 09:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fantastic to see inside this latest machine. It looks like there is still a bit of work to do inside this thing before flight, it is surprising that a photo showing seat frame missing rivets, temporary clamps, missing hardware and covers, and rags on the floor and was allowed out.

Fra Mauro
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posted 08-30-2018 12:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With that perspective, it is a great historic photo, like seeing am Apollo lunar module or command module in construction phases. It is a reminder that in the near future, there will be manned launches from the KSC again.

denali414
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posted 09-06-2018 06:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just watching the NASA channel and had an interview with the Starliner pilot and NASA astronauts. At 3,000 feet, they're saying they will have six explosive bolts that will jettison the heat shield from the vehicle before later deploying the airbags.

Hmm, wonder if we can find some heat shields on the drybeds for some lucites.

All kidding aside, I do hope some of the material does make it to the secondary market.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-06-2018 07:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not to dash hopes, but the Starliner recovery zones will be on military-controlled land and the material will remain Boeing property. I believe the company has plans to recover and dispose of the spent heat shields.

(Of course, Boeing could always chose to produce mementos for their employees or even the public, if it was so inclined.)

denali414
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posted 09-07-2018 06:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The thought was mostly "tongue in cheek". Though the idea of a bunch of space nerds with nets scurrying around a dry bed looking for falling debris also makes me smile, even if just fantasy. I do hope Boeing does make available to workers.

oly
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From: Perth, Western Australia
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posted 09-07-2018 07:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by denali414:
The idea of a bunch of space nerds with nets scurrying around a dry bed looking for falling debris also makes me smile.
The idea of the same nerds finding some debris, and taking it home to cut it into smaller quantities and bag it up, like some back yard drug pushers, so they can squeeze every ounce of profit, to feed the addiction of others maybe not so funny.

Lou Chinal
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posted 05-20-2020 12:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How far could CST-100 fly from Earth for an asteroid encounter?

oly
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posted 05-20-2020 01:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is somewhat of a subjective answer to your question because more information is required. The CST-100 was never designed to fly such a mission.

How far away is the subject asteroid?

The stated endurance for crewed flight is 60 hours, and the design life on station is 210 days. The CST-100 vehicle is designed specifically to fly to the ISS or keep the crew alive following an aborted launch to orbit until the vehicle can reenter and land in a suitable area.

If an unmanned CST-100 were mated to a launch vehicle with enough capability to loft it into a trajectory that intercepts an asteroid, it could be sent anywhere. If the mission were to be manned, the mission would need to be terminated within 60 hours.

The next problem would be the heatshield, which was never designed to withstand the energy of anything greater than a LEO mission.

It would be like trying to surf an Hawaiian pipeline with an ironing board. It may look the part from a distance, but...

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