Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Commercial Space - Military Space
  [Discuss] USAF X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) (Page 2)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   [Discuss] USAF X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV)
Philip
Member

Posts: 5022
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 11-01-2013 11:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
X-37 footage from South Africa: Orbital Test Vehicle 3 in December 2012.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30332
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-12-2013 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wednesday (Dec. 11, 2013) marked one year since the launch of the X-37B on the OTV-3 mission.

The U.S. Air Force has provided no indication as to when the vehicle will land.

cspg
Member

Posts: 4785
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 12-12-2013 09:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Quite amazing. One year in space. Do we know if the vehicle is still operational?

Jim Behling
Member

Posts: 703
From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 12-12-2013 01:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why is that amazing and why wouldn't it be still working? It is just another spacecraft.

NPP was launched a year before still is working. Commsats last 10-15 years. Landsats have lasted decades. Pioneers, Voyager, MRO, Mars Odyssey, etc.

You think just because it lands, it is unique in its on orbit life?

MSL landed on Mars after traveling 8 months in deep space. Stardust returned a capsule after 7 years. Cassini landed a probe on Titan after 8 years.

cspg
Member

Posts: 4785
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 12-12-2013 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Behling:
Why is that amazing and why wouldn't it be still working? It is just another spacecraft.
Seriously? None of spacecraft you refer to are winged vehicles last time I checked and none will return to Earth to be studied and I wouldn't place MSL and Cassini in the same category. As for my query regarding its operational status, the DoD is not NASA.

Jim Behling
Member

Posts: 703
From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 12-12-2013 09:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are you serious? What do wings have to do with the vehicle operating in space for longer than a year? And yes, Stardust did return to earth. But then again, what does any of this have to do with its orbital lifetime?

The wings, landing avionics and guidance, landing gear, etc. have no bearing on OTV operating as a spacecraft or orbit duration. It is "just another" spacecraft is space. It has an operational mission on orbit and "being studied" after landing is the least of it.

My point still stands, what is so "amazing" about being in space for a year? Or for the matter how does being sponsored by the DOD vs. NASA have an effect on whether the vehicle is still working?

SpaceCadet1983
Member

Posts: 58
From: United States
Registered: May 2012

posted 12-13-2013 11:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceCadet1983   Click Here to Email SpaceCadet1983     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with Jim. There are numerous DoD sats that have outlasted their design times, DSP sats being one example. Also lost in this discussion is the fact that OTV-2 was on orbit for 469 days before returning to earth.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30332
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-27-2014 02:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SpaceCadet1983:
...OTV-2 was on orbit for 469 days before returning to earth.
OTV-3 surpassed OTV-2's record on Wednesday (March 26).

SpaceCadet1983
Member

Posts: 58
From: United States
Registered: May 2012

posted 03-27-2014 06:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceCadet1983   Click Here to Email SpaceCadet1983     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
AWESOME! Now the question remains as to how far will the USAF push the duration envelope. My contact at VAFB says they've still expecting OTV-3 to land at Vandenberg, but that's contingent on how long it stays on orbit. I'd say a VAFB landing is a safe bet as the USAF tends to be cautious when testing new technologies, and the completion of the Boeing infrastructure at KSC seems too far off, but who knows!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30332
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-24-2014 06:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As of today (April 24), OTV-3 has been in orbit for 500 days.
The current mission "seems long, but that's based off of the original [270-day] estimate. We don't have anything else to go on," [Brian Weeden, a technical adviser with the Secure World Foundation and a former orbital analyst with the Air Force] told Space.com. "And it's not long for other satellites. It's common for satellites, especially typical national security satellites that are well-designed, to be in orbit for years to decades."

dabolton
Member

Posts: 300
From: Minooka IL, US
Registered: Jan 2009

posted 04-24-2014 08:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton   Click Here to Email dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's okay for objects that aren't intending to return to earth to stay up for years but what about components that are needed for landing, such as tires or control surfaces?

SpaceCadet1983
Member

Posts: 58
From: United States
Registered: May 2012

posted 09-06-2014 02:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceCadet1983   Click Here to Email SpaceCadet1983     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
X-37B OTV-3 surpasses 600 days in space.
In December 2012, the U.S. Air Force launched a miniature space shuttle into orbit. By the end of August, the unmanned space plane had spent 627 days on its classified military mission that seems to have no end.


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement