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  Richard Garriott, astronaut Owen Garriott's son, flies to the space station (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   Richard Garriott, astronaut Owen Garriott's son, flies to the space station
Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-12-2008 02:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space Adventures release
Space Adventures' Client, Private Astronaut Richard Garriott, Successfully Launches To The International Space Station

Space Adventures, Ltd., the only company that provides human space missions to the world marketplace, today announced that its orbital client Richard Garriott and his crew successfully launched aboard a Soyuz TMA spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan en route to the International Space Station (ISS). Garriott joins the Expedition 18 crew, which includes NASA astronaut Michael Fincke and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Lonchakov.

In preparation for his spaceflight, Garriott, son of NASA astronaut Owen Garriott, completed a cosmonaut-training program at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center located in Star City, Russia. This historic mission marks Garriott as the world's 1st second-generation astronaut.

"Today, my dream of following in my father's footsteps to explore new frontiers is being realized," said Richard Garriott. "Throughout my life, my sense of adventure has taken me to the ends of the Earth to embark on journeys few people have encountered. It's with honor and appreciation that I launch on my greatest adventure yet, and step into a role assumed by only five private individuals before me." Garriott continued, "I've dedicated this flight to not only scientific and environmental research, but also educational outreach. I'm thrilled to be able to excite students throughout the world and demonstrate how far our dreams can take us."

Space Adventures became world renowned in 2001 with the launch of client Dennis Tito, the world's first privately funded spaceflight participant. Since then, the company has launched four other individuals to space.

Eric Anderson, president and CEO of Space Adventures, said, "It has always been Space Adventures' goal to open the space frontier. With Richard's launch today, we are not only continuing to demonstrate the viability of civilian space travel, but also the potential for commercial opportunities during our clients' space missions." Anderson continued, "Richard's efforts while on the ISS will be making an important contribution to the future of human permanence in space."

Garriott will participate in a wide range of activities, to include:

Educational Outreach

  • Garriott will communicate with students associated with the Challenger Center for Space Science Education via a NASA-sponsored teleconference, two HAM radio downlinks in cooperation with Amateur Radio on the ISS, and through videotaped experiments that can be replicated on Earth.

  • Garriott will conduct two science experiments designed by primary and secondary students from the United Kingdom in partnership with the British National Space Center.
Scientific Research
  • In cooperation with NASA, Garriott will perform a series of experiments that will study the physical impact of spaceflight on astronauts. Garriott will observe the reaction of the eyes to low and high pressure in a microgravity environment; the effects of spaceflight on the human immune system; and astronauts' sleep/wake patterns and sleep characteristics.

  • Garriott will photograph a number of ecologically significant places on Earth. These photographs will be compared to shots taken 35 years ago by Garriott's father while in space. Together, Garriott and The Nature Conservancy will review the images to document how the Earth has changed in one generation.

  • In cooperation with the European Space Agency, Garriott will perform a series of experiments that will include the study of early detection of osteoporosis; vestibular adaptation to G-force transitions; and the occurrence of lower back pain.
Commercial Activity
  • Garriott will assist the biotechnology company ExtremoZyme, co-founded by Owen Garriott, by conducting Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiments.

  • Seiko has developed the Spring Drive Spacewalk watch, specifically designed for use in space. Garriott will be taking the watch to the ISS, where he will be testing it in a microgravity environment.

  • Richard will be conducting a physics experiment while on the ISS as part of an initiative sponsored by DHL. The experiment has been designed as an educational contest that will take place at the DHL Innovation Center in Bonn, Germany.
Garriott's mission to the ISS is the latest destination in a life defined by adventure and innovation. In recent years, Garriott has conquered incredible adventures that span the globe including searching for meteorites on the continent of Antarctica, tracking mountain gorillas in Rwanda, canoeing down the Amazon, deep ocean hydrothermal vent expeditions and dives to the Titanic. Now, Garriott will embark on his most incredible adventure to date: space exploration. To monitor Richard Garriott's mission, please visit RichardinSpace.com.

Garriott was born in Cambridge, England and raised in Nassau Bay, Texas. In 1980, Garriott attended the University of Texas at Austin where he developed the Ultima computer game series. Garriott, along with his father and brother, created Origin Systems, a private video game publisher. In 1992, Garriott sold Origin Systems to Electronic Arts. In 1999, Garriott left Electronic Arts and in 2000 he formed Destination Games and partnered with NCsoft. In November 2007, his latest game, Richard Garriott's Tabula Rasa, was launched in North America and in the European Union.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-12-2008 02:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Richard's pre-flight letter to family and friends:
Oh, if you are watching the launch... I have a message for you!
This appears to be the message that Richard was referring to...

tegwilym
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posted 10-12-2008 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
This appears to be the message that Richard was referring to...
I figured it was something related to his Ultima games. I tried playing Ultima II years ago on my Commodore 64. I'm not good at role playing games. I died in the first 1/2 hour by some troll or something. 1/2 hour in a game that would last months. I figured I didn't have the right stuff and went on to other types of games!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-12-2008 01:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tegwilym:
I figured it was something related to his Ultima games.
The symbols appear to be related or part of the Logos language that Richard devised for his most recent game, Tabula Rasa.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-14-2008 12:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Challenger Center for Space Education release
Live Challenger Center Broadcast with the ISS: Kids Ask Citizen Cosmonaut "What Are You Looking For in Space"?

Richard Garriott, private space explorer and son of NASA's Skylab Astronaut Dr. Owen Garriott, plans to talk with students through a NASA sponsored live video teleconference, broadcast via the Internet on October 20th at 1:00pm ET during his flight to the International Space Station. The downlink event will be held in Reston, Virginia in coordination with KZO Innovations with students from two D.C. Metropolitan area schools and four Challenger Learning Centers. Students will ask Mr. Garriott original questions about living and working in space. The event will be broadcast live.

Students have posed intriguing questions, such as; "What are you looking for in space? What does the Earth look like from space? Do you think that someday we will live in space? Is there another planet on which humans can live?" and in support of Richard's planned on-orbit activities for students, playing sports in space, "How will you compensate for your players lack of ability to gain momentum?"

Students involved are from Hunter Woods Elementary in Reston, Virginia and Ardmore Elementary from Springdale, Maryland, the Lower Hudson Valley Challenger Learning Center in Suffern, NY, the Buehler Challenger and Science Center in Paramus, New Jersey, the Challenger Learning Center for Science and Technology in Woodstock, Illinois and the Brownsburg Challenger Learning Center in Brownsburg, Indiana.

Mr. Garriott is conducting a variety of educational activities as a part of his scheduled flight to the International Space Station in partnership with the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Teachers and their students can replicate on-orbit activities to demonstrate important concepts in physics and share their predictions about what might happen in the microgravity (weightless) environment of space. Lessons in support of Garriott's on orbit activities, plus webcasts, podcasts and student's predications on YouTube are available.

Challenger Center for Space Science Education was founded in 1986 by the families of the astronauts of the space shuttle Challenger 51-L mission and is dedicated to the educational spirit of that mission. Challenger Learning Center programs at 50 centers continue the crew's mission of engaging teachers and students in science, mathematics, engineering and technology.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-15-2008 01:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
During yesterday's arrival ceremony (which you can watch here), Richard's brother said that Richard's coded launch message referenced "leaving the cradle of the Earth."

Also, if you missed it elsewhere on the site, our interview with Richard and his father Owen is now online: Astronaut's son reboots dad's work in orbit.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-16-2008 11:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Earlier this morning, Richard Garriott came across a small part of space station history.

Calling down to Russia's mission control (TsUP), Expedition 18 flight engineer Yuri Lonchakov asked for permission for Garriott to use the device, which he said was a clear box with colored oil inside.

"It says 'Cube with oil emulsion' in it," Lonchakov described to ground controllers.

"At first I didn't understand what it was, [but] this is Thomas Reiter's educational program that was left behind from him," replied a specialist, referring to Reiter's 2006 European Space Agency Astrolab mission during the station's 13th expedition. "This is the cube where they had the oil dyed in bright color. So, if you shake it vigorously then the bubbles break down into small ones."

"So yeah, you guys can use it for yourselves. That's no problem at all. Have fun!" radioed the ground.

A few minutes later, Lonchakov called down again. "What can we do with it that would be interesting?"

"Well, nothing really interesting can transpire from you playing with this thing. Thomas Reiter used it for his educational program. There was one big bubble and if you shake it, it would break down into several small ones."

"If by now, it doesn't gather back into one big bubble, then it doesn't really do a thing," offered the ground.

Garriott was said to have taken an interest in the experiment to use during educational videos he was recording for the Challenger Center for Space Education.

The European Space Agency' website described the experiment in 2006 as follows:

Oil Emulsion
This experiment will be carried out by school pupils (11-14 years old) on Earth and by Thomas Reiter during his long-duration mission on board the ISS. The space section of "Oil Emulsion" will be filmed and downlinked. This experiment will highlight how an oil/water emulsion behaves differently in weightlessness and under gravity conditions respectively. A sealed container holding two immiscible fluids, clear oil and ink-coloured water, will be shaken until the two fluids are slightly mixed. The fluids' behavior in space will be filmed within defined time slots during a maximum of two weeks. The data will be down linked and the results will be shown in a specialized childrens programme on German public TV. The different kinds of segregation that occur during the experiment, in space and on Earth, can be observed and then explained by the teacher. This experiment can form the basis of further physics lessons, (concerning weightlessness, density, other fluid parameters) and maybe even lessons in other scientific areas. The Oil Emulsion experiment was introduced by DLR and is a cooperation between the German and the European Space Agencies.

Oil emulsion experiment - highlighting how an oil/water emulsion behaves differently in weightlessness and in normal gravity. Credit: DLR

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-16-2008 06:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Click above photo to enlarge (1.9 mb) Credit: Space Adventures

From Astronaut's son reboots dad's work in orbit:

"My dad's call sign is W5LFL and my grandfather's call sign was W5KWQ," explained Richard. "So in this case it will be an interesting generational flip: my father got to call down as W5LFL to W5KWQ, I get to do the reverse."
On October 15, Richard spoke to his father from space on ham radio for the first time. You can listen to segments from this historic recording by clicking here (2.2mb mp3).

In the photos above, Garriott is seen storing his Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment for his father's company ExtremoZyme.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-20-2008 07:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The joint crews of ISS Expedition 17 and 18, along with Richard Garriott participated in an in-flight news conference on Monday, during which colletSPACE had a chance to ask Garriott about some of his on-orbit activities, Mike Fincke about his readjustment to life on orbit and Greg Chamitoff about how he will leave his mark aboard the station.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-24-2008 01:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space Adventures release
Space Adventures' Client, Private Astronaut Richard Garriott, Returns To Earth After Completing Mission to the ISS

Space Adventures, Ltd., the only company that provides human space missions to the world marketplace, announced today that its orbital client Richard Garriott and his crew successfully landed in the Kazakhstan steppes after a visit to the International Space Station (ISS). Garriott returned to Earth aboard the Soyuz TMA-12 spacecraft with Expedition 17 crewmembers Sergei Volkov and Oleg Kononenko, who both spent six months aboard the ISS.

Garriott, son of NASA astronaut Owen Garriott, made history during his mission by becoming the 1st second-generation astronaut. The flight back to Earth marked another historical milestone as Garriott traveled with the 1st second-generation cosmonaut, Sergei Volkov.

"This mission to the ISS fulfilled a lifelong dream to experience spaceflight as my father first did 35 years ago; it's an honor to be the first American to follow a parent into space," said Richard Garriott. "This experience made possible by Space Adventures - from my training in Star City, to lift-off, orbit and finally docking with and staying on the ISS - has been more gratifying than anything I could have ever imagined." Garriott continued, "While in space, I had the opportunity to conduct scientific experiments and environmental research, but what was most rewarding was speaking to students. Growing up in an astronaut family, I firmly believed that every person could go to space, and now I have. I took this opportunity to inspire them with my adventure and let them know they can achieve their wildest dreams as well with hard work and perseverance."

Eric Anderson, president and CEO of Space Adventures, said, "We're proud to have assisted Richard in achieving his lifelong goal of spaceflight. This history-making mission not only made Richard the 1st second-generation astronaut, but also opened the space frontier to commercial opportunities, which truly demonstrates the reality of private space exploration."

On October 12, Garriott launched aboard the Soyuz TMA-13 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. He joined Expedition 18 crewmembers Mike Fincke and Yuri Lonchakov, for the flight. They arrived at the space station on October 14 and were greeted by the Expedition 17 crew.

In preparation for his spaceflight, Garriott completed a cosmonaut-training program at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center located in Star City, Russia. During his stay aboard the ISS, Garriott focused on scientific and environmental research, as well as educational outreach:

  • Garriott communicated with students associated with the Challenger Center for Space Science Education via a NASA-sponsored teleconference, HAM radio downlinks and through videotaped experiments. Garriott also conducted a HAM radio downlink and two science experiments designed by primary and secondary students from the United Kingdom in partnership with the British National Space Center.
  • In cooperation with NASA, Garriott performed a series of experiments that examined the physical impact of spaceflight on astronauts. Garriott observed the reaction of the eyes to low and high pressure in a microgravity environment; the effects of spaceflight on the human immune system; and astronauts' sleep/wake patterns and sleep characteristics.
  • On behalf of The Nature Conservancy, Garriott photographed a number of ecologically significant places on Earth. The photographs will be compared to shots taken 35 years ago by Garriott's father while in space. Together, Garriott and The Nature Conservancy will review the images to document how the Earth has changed in one generation.
  • Garriott worked in cooperation with the European Space Agency to perform a series of experiments that observed early detection of osteoporosis, vestibular adaptation to G-force transitions and the occurrence of lower back pain.
  • Garriott supported a number of commercial partners. He assisted the biotechnology company ExtremoZyme, co-founded by Owen Garriott, by conducting Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiments. Additionally, Garriott tested a SEIKO Spring Drive Spacewalk watch, specifically designed for use in space. Garriott also conducted a physics experiment as part of an initiative sponsored by DHL, planned as an educational contest that will take place at the DHL Innovation Center in Bonn, Germany.
Garriott has been chronicling the details of his mission, from training to landing, on his Web site www.RichardinSpace.com with photos, video, audio, in-depth blogs and answers to questions posed by visitors to the site. Now back on solid ground, Garriott will continue to share his experiences on his site, expanding upon his time aboard the ISS and providing insights into his landing and return to Earth.

KenDavis
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posted 11-10-2008 04:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KenDavis   Click Here to Email KenDavis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just read an intersting sentence in Spaceflight magazine:
Nik Halik paid for his training to be back-up to Richard Garriott although he would not have flown even if Garriott had been disqualified.
My question is: what is the point of paying all that money if there is no chance of flying? Why not just save the money and buy onto a prime crew?

What's the point of a back-up if they don't back-up?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-10-2008 05:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KenDavis:
What's the point of a back-up if they don't back-up?
Does Spaceflight magazine cite a source for that statement?

Daisuke Enomoto's back-up, Anousheh Ansari, did fly, though she had to pay the full ticket price. Back-ups only (initially) pay the training cost, a few million dollars, which is not anywhere close to the full fare.

Perhaps that is what Spaceflight magazine was referencing.

As to why someone might pay $3 million just to train, Space Adventures' CEO Eric Anderson gave some of the reasons while announcing Halik as Garriott's back-up.

"Through his participation as a back-up crew member, Nik will experience first-hand how our clients train for spaceflight and he, himself, will be certified as a 'fully-trained cosmonaut' and will be named to an official space mission crew, a distinction that less than 1,000 people have ever had."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-07-2009 09:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Popular Mechanics: Science Experiments in Space
Richard and Owen Garriott Talk Private Space Flight, Science in Space

Thirty-five years after NASA astronaut Owen Garriott first flew into space, his son Richard, a successful video-game designer, followed suit as a private citizen. The younger Garriott brokered a deal through the firm Space Adventures to pay the Russian Federal Space Agency about $30 million for a ride aboard a Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station last October. Below are Richard and Owen Garriotts' thoughts and experiences on private space flight and scientific research aboard the International Space Station.

RMH
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posted 05-18-2009 01:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for RMH   Click Here to Email RMH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had the opportunity to listen to a presentation by Richard Garriott on May 16 and wrote some notes. He also made mention that June Scobee was one of his science teachers. When asked about noise levels aboard the ISS he said the two newest modules were virtually noise proof unlike the older ones.

---

At the Dayton, Ohio Hamvention, the largest of its kind for Ham radio enthusiast Richard Garriott shared his experience on the ISS and his time using the Ham radio while on board. His father, Owen, also in attendance was the first to use a Ham radio on his STS-9 space shuttle mission.

Amateur Radio has become a family affair. Richard used his grandfathers call sign while using a ham radio which he brought with him on his trip and subsequently left on the ISS for others to use. He would realize quickly the organization and breadth of the radio community while in space. Trying to conserve on the batteries needed to run his Radio he tried to stretch them past their 4 hour useful life. While on board everything seemed to be running smoothly in his efforts with the radio, he would quickly learn the next day that the batteries only were lasting for the 4 hours. During his daily ground communications with his father, whom ran his ground control team, called up that everyone appreciates his efforts but that he needed to change his batteries more often.

Richard would not only use his fathers experience in space by having him run the ground control team staying in the Russian mission control and as part of the helicopter team that would eventually retrieve him once he landed. His dad also became a source of competition. During his first day Richard would write his radio contacts on the back of the pages of his flight plan in a single column. As time went on and he becoming more successful he started to make double columns then triple columns. He would think of his dads experience using the radio and wondered about how many contacts he might have had during his shuttle mission and vowed to try to beat him. Richard would eventually pass the 500 mark in two way communications. He suspects his dad only had one or two hundred.

Richard Garriott was suppose to be the first so called space tourist in space. Having accumulated the finances needed through investments in the internet. As the time approached the dot com bubble burst sending his needed wealth sliding and being forced to sell his seat to Denis Tito. In October 2008, his dream finally came true.

Growing up with neighbors like Joe Engle on the right and Hoot Gibson on the left while having Owen for a father, Richard thought everyone went into space. But later a NASA doctor would tell him your "poor eyesight means you will never be selected to be a NASA astronaut." Once in space he would find it ironic that the one science query NASA was most interested in were his eyes. He was the first person to fly in space to have corrective eye surgery.

He was amazed to see, 48 hours before his launch, the rocket he was to fly into space with was still lying in pieces. The day before his launch it would all come together and roll out to the launch pad by train. During his entire mission he felt space travel to be "quiet, smooth, and non threatening." Once in space he would look out the window of his Soyuz capsule and see an odd mixture of high tech gizmo's and hand stitched fabric that would protect him on his journey to and from his trip to the ISS. During the re-entry he would notice heat shield fragments flying off past his window before a "ka whomp" as he landed on the ground with the use of a parachute before bouncing and rolling to a stop.

Once on board the ISS his first activity was to set up his radio station. His first impressions of the ISS was that it was very "cluttered." He spent a great deal of his spare time making connections to those on the ground using his radio. He considers it "the most challenging, the most rewarding activity I had on orbit."

FFrench
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posted 05-19-2009 05:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RMH:
I had the opportunity to listen to a presentation by Richard Garriott.... Growing up with neighbors like Joe Engle on the right and Hoot Gibson on the left while having Owen for a father, Richard thought everyone went into space.

Thanks, Randy, for that interesting account. The house Hoot Gibson (and Rhea Seddon) lived in was formerly owned by Al Worden, and Worden remembers Richard running around the neighborhood as a little kid.

John Charles
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posted 06-14-2009 05:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for John Charles     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RMH:
I had the opportunity to listen to a presentation by Richard Garriott on May 16 and wrote some notes.
Randy, thanks for the summary. I heard Richard speak at the Aerospace Medical Association annual conference in Los Angeles on May 7. (Owen was there, too, for a Skylab retrospective panel.)

Did Richard describe his exciting experience during re-entry and landing, when a gas bottle broke loose and jammed his seat? The Kazbek seats in the Soyuz are "cocked" upwards when the parachutes deploy, to give them some room to stroke on landing, to cushion the impact. Apparently a gas bottle (backup oxygen, maybe?) came loose from its mount in the forward section of the re-entry capsule at that time, and fell, narrowly missing Richard's head, and jammed his seat. He and the others worked to remove it and let the seat go through its whole range of motion. As I recall, they were successful, and he was none the worse for the experience.

If you remember him mentioning this, please correct any mistakes in my account.

RMH
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posted 06-15-2009 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for RMH   Click Here to Email RMH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
He did mention this during the presentation that I was at. I do not remember exactly what it was that got lodged behind his seat but your account sounds accurate to what I remember him talking about. Glad you got to see Owen as well. He was at the event I went to but he did not give a speech. It was neat seeing the two of them together.


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