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  The Jet Age: Introduction of the 707 [video]

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Author Topic:   The Jet Age: Introduction of the 707 [video]
SkyMan1958
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Posts: 488
From: CA.
Registered: Jan 2011

posted 10-28-2014 04:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While not directly a space topic, this is a related topic having to do with flying.

The Boeing 707 ushered in the commercial Jet Age. Boeing built 1,010 707s for commercial airlines between 1958 and 1978, and a another 800 for the military up until 1991.

I found this fun 1959 Pan American film documentary (propaganda/advertisement piece) on YouTube. It is called: "The Wonderful Jet World of Pan American."

It's a nice "timepiece" that shows a bit about the conception of flight during the year the Mercury astronauts were picked. It's about 25 minutes long.

moorouge
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Posts: 1858
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 10-28-2014 04:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
The Boeing 707 ushered in the commercial Jet Age.
I was under the impression that the first commercial flight by a jet was a De Havilland Comet. The Comet 4 also beat the 707 to the first trans-Atlantic flight.

SkyMan1958
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Posts: 488
From: CA.
Registered: Jan 2011

posted 10-28-2014 10:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I stand by my statement that the 707 was the jet that made the commercial Jet Age viable.

Yes, the Comet did have the first commercial flights. However, due to the little problem of them breaking up in flight, they were withdrawn from service. They eventually returned in the form of the Comet 2, 3 and by far the most successful version, Comet 4. However, to quote Wikipedia:

The Comet 4 enabled BOAC to inaugurate the first regular jet-powered transatlantic services on 4 October 1958 between London and New York (albeit still requiring a fuel stop at Gander International Airport, Newfoundland, on westward North Atlantic crossings). While BOAC gained publicity as the first to provide transatlantic jet service, by the end of the month rival Pan American World Airways was flying the Boeing 707 on the same route, and in 1960 the Douglas DC-8 as well. The American jets were larger, faster, longer-ranged, and more cost-effective than the Comet. After analysing route structures for the Comet, BOAC reluctantly cast about for a successor, and in 1956 entered into an agreement with Boeing to purchase the 707.
It was the 707 that successfully commercially ushered in the Jet Age.

In any case, the film clip is still a fun time period piece.

moorouge
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Posts: 1858
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 10-29-2014 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just as a point for debate: how much of the success of the 707 depended on the accidents to the Comet 1 highlighting the problems caused by stress related metal fatigue in high flying pressurised commercial jets?

Kite
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Posts: 348
From: Northampton UK
Registered: Nov 2009

posted 10-29-2014 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kite     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very much so. De Havilland opened up all their research into the accidents to the world so planemakers could ensure it wouldn't happen again. At the time they were a couple of years or so ahead in jet airliners and obviously lost their lead.

Having said that I'm sure the USA would still have caught up, with their huge potential market and resources, and the 707 and DC8 were excellent aircraft.

All times are CT (US)

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