Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Satellites - Robotic Probes
  Future fate of Mars robotic landers and rovers

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Future fate of Mars robotic landers and rovers
Fezman92
Member

Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 11-26-2011 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When we eventually get to Mars with humans what will happen to all the rovers we sent out? Will they be collected at one point and end up in the Smithsonian and other museums?

I know with Apollo, we didn't take the probes back. I could see them possibly taking one of the smaller rovers back with them.

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 1394
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 11-26-2011 02:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Remember on Apollo 12 parts of Surveyor came back with them. Any return material from Mars would be a limited quantity but I could see that a part of an earlier spacecraft returned to Earth would have some significant scientific value.

crash
Member

Posts: 196
From: West Sussex, England
Registered: Jan 2011

posted 11-26-2011 03:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for crash   Click Here to Email crash     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think that the huge amount of energy/fuel required to move that extra payload will prohibit a whole rover being returned. Removable data, maybe.

AusSpace
Member

Posts: 25
From: Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Registered: Nov 2010

posted 11-26-2011 05:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AusSpace   Click Here to Email AusSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not quite the Martian rovers yet, but NASA has recently begun to look at how to go about protecting sites of historic significance of the moon.

Robert Kelso, NASA's director of lunar commercial services at Johnson Space Center in Houston, recently released a draft guideline, setting limits NASA wishes parties to follow when approaching Apollo or other past exploration sites.

Until a few years ago, space archeology was only really looked at by a small number of individuals. With the recent flurry in lunar exploration and the Google Lunar X PRIZE awarding bonuses for approaching an Apollo site, NASA thought it was warranted to get the ball rolling on discussing these issues. The new guidelines aren't laws to be enforced, but merely recommendations NASA hopes other parties will observe to protect these important sites with their scientific and culturally values, for future generations, until a more thorough law can be agreed upon.

I'm sure that once there are laws preserving lunar artifacts, these will easily be extrapolated upon to include other celestial bodies, especially Mars.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2123
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 11-28-2011 01:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At the National Air and Space Museum - at least, the last time I looked - is a plaque for a future astronaut to place at the Viking 1 lander, naming it the Thomas A. Mutch Memorial Station, after the former leader of the Viking Lander Imaging Science Team.

The Pathfinder lander was renamed the Carl Sagan Memorial Station. (Fictionally, a plaque will also be placed there.)

Max Q
Member

Posts: 381
From: Whyalla South Australia
Registered: Mar 2007

posted 11-28-2011 11:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Max Q   Click Here to Email Max Q     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Will such laws even be police-able? And are all sites truly worthy of preservation? I think the first and last are of historical significance and maybe a lunar rover site. But if real science can be carried out the few remaining sites might reveal some interesting info.

Fezman92
Member

Posts: 1030
From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 11-28-2011 11:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think that the MERs (Spirit and Opportunity) should be among those preserved, along with the Vikings.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement