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  Juno to Jupiter: Viewing, questions, comments

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Author Topic:   Juno to Jupiter: Viewing, questions, comments
Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-05-2011 07:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Juno to Jupiter: mission viewing, questions, comments
This thread is intended for comments and questions regarding the Juno mission and the updates published under the topic: NASA's Juno mission to explore Jupiter.

The Juno mission is the first in which a spacecraft will be placed in a highly elliptical polar orbit around the giant gas planet to understand its formation, evolution and structure. Underneath its dense cloud cover, Jupiter safeguards secrets to the fundamental processes and conditions that governed our early solar system.

The solar-powered probe — its three tractor trailer-size solar panels the first to power a spacecraft so far from the Sun — will map the planet's gravity and magnetic fields to learn what Jupiter's interior structure is like. Juno's color camera will provide close-up images of Jupiter, including the first detailed glimpse of the planet's poles.

Launched in 2011, Juno will arrive at Jupiter in July 2016 to begin one year (33 revolutions) of observations before crashing into the planet.

albatron
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From: Stuart, Florida, USA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 08-05-2011 02:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for albatron   Click Here to Email albatron     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A wonderful and clear view of the launch here in S. Florida.

Fra Mauro
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From: Maspeth, NY
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 08-05-2011 02:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great coverage on the NASA network too. I was shocked to see one of the major cable networks show the launch!

Hawkman
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From: Union, New Jersey
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posted 08-05-2011 02:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hawkman   Click Here to Email Hawkman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
More importantly, I wonder if Lego will sell replicas of the Lego figures aboard the probe?

cspg
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From: Geneva, Switzerland
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posted 08-05-2011 02:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The solids separated when the rocket was almost vertical to its launch pad or at least what appears to be over land. An optical illusion?

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 08-05-2011 03:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hawkman:
I wonder if Lego will sell replicas...
I asked Lego this very question. Here's their reply:
We won't be offering these sets for sale in metal as they are simply too expensive... It is possible for LEGO fans to build them themselves, as all the parts are standard - apart from Jupiter's thunderbolt!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-05-2011 03:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
An optical illusion?
Yes, an optical illusion. The rocket cam is mounted on the underside of the rocket such that it looks back at land...

Hawkman
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From: Union, New Jersey
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posted 08-05-2011 05:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hawkman   Click Here to Email Hawkman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We won't be offering these sets for sale in metal as they are simply too expensive... It is possible for LEGO fans to build them themselves, as all the parts are standard - apart from Jupiter's thunderbolt!
Sigh. Oh well

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-08-2011 04:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
United Launch Alliance's launch highlights video:

Saturn V
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From: Golden, Colorado, USA
Registered: Nov 2006

posted 08-14-2013 12:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Saturn V     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone know at what time Juno will flyby Earth on October 9th? It would be nice to watch it go by.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-09-2013 02:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA's Juno probe will be a mere 347 miles (558 kilometers) from Earth and over South Africa when it makes its closest approach at 2:21 p.m. CDT (1921 GMT).

Later tonight, at 8:30 p.m. CDT (0130 GMT), the online Slooh Space Camera will track the Juno spacecraft's Earth flyby live in a free webcast.

SkyMan1958
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posted 10-09-2013 06:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm surprised to find out that Juno is supposed to only be operational for one year orbiting Jupiter given the length of time it's taking on getting to Jupiter. Given that for most satellites the limiting factor is maneuvering propellant, I would think that unless there is an outrageous "safety factor" in the amount of propellant involved then the one year would be relatively close to the actual length of the science mission.

Does anyone know if this "one year" is one of those wink, wink, nod, nod kind of parameters where most likely the actual scientific mission will proceed well beyond its intended timeline?

Jim Behling
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From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 10-09-2013 07:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SkyMan1958:
Does anyone know if this "one year" is one of those wink, wink, nod, nod kind of parameters where most likely the actual scientific mission will proceed well beyond its intended timeline?
No, it is the ability of the avionics to withstand the radiation environment, which is the limiting factor. They are going to purposely deorbit Juno at the completion of its mission. They don't want to risk it crashing into a moon years down the road.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 10-09-2013 07:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
To build upon what Jim wrote, here are the relevant passages from the press kit:
For many of the instruments to do their job, the spacecraft has to get closer to Jupiter than any previous mission. To avoid the highest levels of radiation in the belts surrounding Jupiter, mission navigators have designed a highly elongated orbit that approaches the gas giant from the north... As Juno exits over the south pole, its orbit carries it far beyond even the Jovian moon Callisto's orbit.
That highly elongated orbit also allows the spacecraft's three massive solar panels to be constantly bathed in sunlight, but creates an impact risk, such that...
The deorbit maneuver was designed to satisfy NASA's planetary protection requirements and ensure that Juno does not impact Europa (as well as Ganymede and Callisto).

cspg
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From: Geneva, Switzerland
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posted 10-10-2013 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"Juno enters 'safe mode' after Earth flyby"

Due to NASA's shutdown?

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27892
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-10-2013 10:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceWeather.com has a neat gallery of ground-based observations of the Juno Earth flyby.

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