Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  ESA - JAXA - China - International
  British astronaut Tim Peake's 2015 mission to ISS

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   British astronaut Tim Peake's 2015 mission to ISS
gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3204
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-20-2013 07:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
UK astronaut Tim Peake is to fly to the International Space Station, launching on a Soyuz rocket in November or December 2015 according to the BBC.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30016
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-20-2013 07:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
UK Space Agency release
Tim Peake to be first British Astronaut in space for over 20 years

Former Apache helicopter pilot Tim Peake is to become the first British astronaut to visit the International Space Station, making him the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years.

After more than three years of training with the European Space Agency's (ESA) Astronaut Programme, Peake has been selected to live and work on the International Space Station (ISS) for six months. He will carry out a comprehensive science programme and take part in a European education outreach programme in the build up to and during his mission.

Tim is one of six astronauts who have been selected from among 8,000 hopefuls. The flight is expected to take place in November 2015.

Speaking at a special event at the Science Museum in London, Tim Peake said:

"I am delighted to be proposed for a long-duration mission to the International Space Station. This is another important mission for Europe and in particular a wonderful opportunity for European science, industry and education to benefit from microgravity research.

"Since joining the European Astronaut Corps in 2009, I have been training to work on the Station and I am extremely grateful to the ground support teams who make it possible for us to push the boundaries of knowledge through human spaceflight and exploration."

Prime Minister David Cameron said:

"This is a momentous day, not just for Tim Peake but for Great Britain. It is a great sign of our thriving British space sector, which has seen real growth thanks to our world-class research, and now supports nearly 30,000 jobs.

"What an achievement that Tim was picked for this historic role from over 8,000 applicants from around the world. I am sure he will do us proud and I hope that he will inspire the next generation to pursue exciting careers in science and engineering."

Tim was appointed as an ambassador for UK science and space-based careers in 2009 and is working with the UK Space Agency in developing the UK's microgravity research programme. He has been involved in the international Mission X programme, which promotes science careers and healthy lifestyles in schools, and his outreach will continue throughout his training and his time on the International Space Station (ISS).

Minister for Universities and Science David Willetts, said:

"This is a landmark moment for Britain and our reputation as a leading science nation. Not only will we have the first UK astronaut for over two decades, but Tim Peake will be the first ever Briton to carry out ground-breaking research on the International Space Station.

"Tim represents the very best of British. He will become a powerful role model for the young people we need to bolster this country's science and engineering workforce.

"Today's announcement builds on the continued success of the British space sector, which is worth #9 billion to the economy annually and employs nearly 30,000 people."

Tim is the first British ESA astronaut and the second British astronaut that did not have to get US citizenship to fly to space.

Today's announcement follows increased investment by the UK Space Agency in Europe's space programme to #240 million per year, including a #16 million contribution to the ISS, agreed at the ESA Ministerial last November. This is expected to secure #1 billion in orders per year for British businesses.

Space technology is an essential part of everyday life and is vital for weather forecasting, navigation, global communications, broadcasting and health. Traffic monitoring, for example, relies on the GPS satellite system. CAT scanners and MRI scanners, which allow more accurate diagnosis and reduce the need for exploratory operations, were developed from technology originally used for enhancing images taken of space.

Space can also provide the tools to manage global challenges such as climate change and natural disasters, and has helped drive the development of robotics.

Chief Executive of the UK Space Agency Dr David Parker said:

"Tim Peake is working with the UK Space Agency to help us build a strong programme of science in the UK. With our new investment in the International Space Station and Europe's microgravity programme, his flight in 2015 could help expand our international competitiveness in areas such as health and ageing research, innovative materials and plasma physics.

"Tim is also an inspirational role model for young people in the UK. As an ambassador for UK science and space-based careers, he is demonstrating the upper limits of what British kids of every age can aspire to."

ESA's Director of Human Spaceflight and Operations Thomas Reiter said:

"The value of Europe's astronauts and the training given at the European Astronaut Centre is reflected in the large number of mission assignments awarded to ESA astronauts.

"I am confident that all astronauts of ESA's 2009 class will have flown to the International Space Station by 2017 and that we will continue to use this unique research facility in Earth orbit for many years to come."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30016
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-20-2013 10:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
European Space Agency (ESA) release
ESA astronaut Timothy Peake set for Space Station

ESA's Director General, Jean-Jacques Dordain, announced today that the ISS Multilateral Crew Operations Panel has decided on Friday, 17 May to accept his proposal to fly astronaut Timothy Peake to the International Space Station in 2015.

"When we recruited the six new ESA astronauts in May 2009, I made a promise to secure flight opportunities for all of them. Thanks to the decisions of the Member States at the Ministerial Council last November, we will be able to fulfil our commitment to fly all six newly selected astronauts before the end of 2017. The first three astronauts already had their missions assigned. Today I am very happy to announce the assignment of Timothy Peake for a mission to the International Space Station. The two remaining astronauts, Andreas Mogensen and Thomas Pesquet, will be assigned before mid-2015 for flights at the latest in 2017."

Timothy Peake will join the crew of Expedition 46/47 for six months in 2015. He will be the first British citizen to live and work on the Space Station and it will be the eighth long-duration mission for an ESA astronaut.

Timothy's classmate ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is preparing for launch to the orbital outpost on 28 May. Timothy's mission will follow those of ESA astronauts Alexander Gerst and Samantha Cristoforetti, both scheduled for launch in 2014.

"The value of Europe's astronauts and the training given at the European Astronaut Centre is reflected in the large number of mission assignments awarded to ESA astronauts," notes Thomas Reiter, ESA's Director of Human Spaceflight and Operations.

A former helicopter test pilot and Major in the British Army, Timothy is thrilled with his assignment: "I am delighted to be proposed for a long-duration mission to the International Space Station. This is another important mission for Europe and in particular a wonderful opportunity for European science, industry and education to benefit from microgravity research.

"Since joining the European Astronaut Corps in 2009, I have been training to work on the Station and I am extremely grateful to the ground support teams who make it possible for us to push the boundaries of knowledge through human spaceflight and exploration."

About Timothy Peake

In 2009, Timothy was appointed as a UK ambassador for science and space-based careers. He has worked with the UK Space Agency in developing the country's microgravity research programme.

After graduating from basic astronaut training in November 2010, Timothy continued training to increase his skills in weightlessness, including working in spacesuits, and his knowledge of the different modules of the Space Station.

In 2011, Timothy took part in ESA's international Caves training that simulated space exploration during a week-long stay underground, isolated from the outside world.

In 2012, he spent almost two weeks in an underwater base off the coast of Florida, USA, as part of NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operations, or NEEMO - a testbed for space exploration technologies. The course focused on asteroid exploration involving communication delays with ground control and working on a simulated asteroid.

From his homebase at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, Timothy will start his mission training with the partners of the International Space Station. It will take him to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, USA, Star City, near Moscow, Russia, as well as Japan and Canada.

328KF
Member

Posts: 904
From:
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 05-20-2013 02:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'll bet our British readers are beyond excited about this. Congratulations to you for having your first "official" astronaut fly and represent your country onboard the ISS.

It's been a long time coming!

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1842
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 05-21-2013 05:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, congratulations to Tim Peake. I met him last year after a lecture, he was most accomodating and gracious.

At last we will have a "Brit" on the ISS.

issman1
Member

Posts: 907
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 05-21-2013 12:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Definitely has been an unnecessarily long gap between Helen Sharman's 1991 short-duration mission to Mir and Tim Peake's long-duration ISS flight in 2015/16. Hopefully it will not be the last.

I noticed that during the press conference at the London Science Museum one reporter could not resist asking about the cost. According to the British government minister, GBP16 million?

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1842
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 05-21-2013 03:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's the value that's important not the cost.

issman1
Member

Posts: 907
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 05-23-2013 03:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed, but try telling that to the BBC's Jeremy Paxman.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30016
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-18-2014 07:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
European Space Agency release
ESA mission name for astronaut Tim Peake: Principia

When ESA astronaut Tim Peake sets off for his six-month space journey next year, he will be flying under the mission name of Principia.

More than 4000 people replied to the call for a mission name earlier this year and Principia was suggested 20 times. The name refers to Isaac Newton's world-changing three-part text on physics, Naturalis Principia Mathematica, describing the principal laws of motion and gravity.

Famously pondering why apples fall from trees, Newton wrote down the laws of gravity and laid the basis for working with it, a requirement for spaceflight. Tim Peake will spend six months living in weightlessness, the first time a British–ESA astronaut will visit the International Space Station.

"I am delighted with this name that honours one of Britain's most famous scientists," Tim says. "I hope it will also encourage people to observe the world as if for the first time — just as Isaac Newton did.

"Our planet Earth is a precious and beautiful place and we all need to safeguard it."

Tim will be launched from Russia's Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in November 2015 — and will be able to enjoy Newton's favourite fruit as supply ships arrive at the international space laboratory. One of his aims is to inspire children during his stay in space, in particular by promoting healthy eating.

The International Space Station is first and foremost a place of science, and the six astronauts there spend much of their time working on experiments that cannot be done anywhere on Earth.

It's a busy time in space for ESA astronauts, with Alexander Gerst currently working in the Station, Samantha Cristoforetti leaving for it in November this year, and Andreas Mogensen being launched shortly before Tim's mission for a 10-day stay on the Station.

spaceman
Member

Posts: 971
From: Walsall, West Midlands, UK
Registered: Dec 2002

posted 07-18-2014 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman   Click Here to Email spaceman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Earlier this week with only one day's notice, my wife and I were invited to a champagne reception in London. We attended the event at the Royal Society for the official mission naming ceremony.

I had entered the naming competition with Principia as my suggestion. As it turned out 19 others had also done so. Some ten winners were able to attend, we met Tim and had a chat, posed with him for some photos. He promised we would all receive a signed mission insignia from the ISS upon his return.

We also managed to get close up to a display of some of the original notes and letters handwritten by Sir Isaac Newton to create the Principia. An original telescope, Newton's death mask and some space flown apple tree wood. Photo to follow!

We were sworn to secrecy as the name was to be officially released at the Farnborough Air Show the following evening, however events that occurred in the skies above Ukraine quite rightly took precedence. Our thoughts are with the friends and families of all involved.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement