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  Shenzhou 10: Viewing, comments and questions

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Author Topic:   Shenzhou 10: Viewing, comments and questions
Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-05-2013 08:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Shenzhou 10: mission viewing, questions, comments
This thread is intended for members' comments and questions about China's Shenzhou 10 manned mission and the updates posted under the topic: China's Shenzhou 10 mission to Tiangong-1.

China's Shenzhou 10 spacecraft will liftoff with three crew members to dock with the Tiangong-1 orbiting module.

East-Frisian
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posted 05-05-2013 08:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for East-Frisian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to the site of the Space Shuttle Almanac, China announced that Wang Yaping will become their second woman in space aboard Shenzhou 10 in June.

Robonaut
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posted 05-06-2013 04:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robonaut   Click Here to Email Robonaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There are two female taikonauts, Lui Yang, who flew on Shenzhou 9 and her back-up Wang Yaping. Chinese press reports are consistently talking about a female taikonaut being included in the crew of Shenzhou 10 but this has not been officially confirmed. However, some of the people discussing the inclusion of a female are involved in the space programme and I am sure they would not be talking about this openly without some official sanction.

One senior official has said that Wang Yaping is the only female currently training and that none of the three Shenzhou 9 taikonauts will fly on Shenzhou 10.

Lui Yang is on post flight ceremonial duties and is unlikely to be risked on a further mission – similar to the situation with Yuri Gagarin and John Glenn back in the 1960’s.

It is possible that the back-up crew for Shenzhou 9, Nie Haisheng, Zhang Xiaoguan and Wang Yaping, will fly Shenzhou 10 but if the normal pattern continues we will not have the names confirmed publically until a few days before the launch. I would not be surprised to see other taikonauts involved. Launch is currently expected on or around 7 June 2013 (date based upon calculations made by western space sleuths).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-03-2013 07:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Shenzhou 10 spacecraft is scheduled to launch "in the middle of June," a spokesperson for China's manned space program announced on Monday (June 3).
The mission has entered the final phase of preparations, with the modified model of the Long March-2F carrier rocket and spacecraft being transported to the launch site on Monday morning, said the spokesperson.

The spacecraft, which will be launched in mid-June from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, will carry three astronauts and dock with the Tiangong-1, a target orbiter and space module sent to space in 2011.

During the mission, astronauts will also teach a lesson to a group of students via a video feed, said the spokesperson.

Robonaut
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posted 06-10-2013 05:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robonaut   Click Here to Email Robonaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Shenzhou 10 mission is due to launch at 09:38 GMT on Tuesday 11 June 2013. At a press conference Monday, the crew were introduced. They are Nie Haisheng, Zhang Xiaoguan and Wang Yaping. They were the back-up crew for the Shenzhou 9 mission to the Tiangong 1 space station in 2012.

Nie is making his second trip into space having previously flown on Shenzhou 6 in 2005. The other two will be flying for the first time. Zhang was selected for training as far back as 1998 but Wang is more fortunate having joined the programme in 2010. Wang will be China’s second female in space.

SkyMan1958
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posted 06-10-2013 12:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's the People's Daily webpage covering the Shenzhou-10 mission. There are a wide variety of links on the page. Be aware that two embedded videos will start up (in English) soon after the page is opened. These can easily be turned off by clicking their pause buttons.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-11-2013 06:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Video of the Shenzhou 10 launch, via Russia Today:

cspg
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posted 06-11-2013 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Interesting views, the escape tower - and the strap-ons seperate along with the first stage? Are there other rockets which do that?

Ronpur
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posted 06-11-2013 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great video. I also have never seen strap on seperate at the same time as the first stage. Some of the photos I have seen from the viewing area makes it seam a little close to the pad!

KAPTEC
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posted 06-11-2013 11:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KAPTEC   Click Here to Email KAPTEC     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good luck Taikonauts. Have a safe trip...

Glint
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posted 06-11-2013 11:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ronpur:
I also have never seen strap on seperate at the same time as the first stage.

Right. What's the point in having the strap-ons separate in the first place when the stage is being jettisoned already?

Saturn V
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posted 06-11-2013 11:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Saturn V     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The taikonauts do not seem to be involved with any of the "flying" of the rocket. They seem to be just part of the cargo.

Glint
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posted 06-11-2013 12:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When is rendezvous with Tiangong 1 so we can hopefully try and watch during a favorable pass?

cspg
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posted 06-11-2013 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Saturn V:
The Taikonauts do not seem to be involved with any of the "flying" of the rocket. They seem to be just part of the cargo.
Do you know any human-rated launch systems (that go into orbit) where the crew actually flies the rocket?

Glint
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posted 06-11-2013 12:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Saturn V:
The Taikonauts do not seem to be involved with any of the "flying" of the rocket.
Even with a supersized space-age chopstick, it's hard to poke your buttons correctly when the rocket's shaking, rattling, and rolling.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-11-2013 01:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glint:
When is rendezvous with Tiangong 1 so we can hopefully try and watch during a favorable pass?
The flight is following a two-day rendezvous trajectory, and so arrival at Tiangong-1 is expected on June 13.

Glint
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posted 06-11-2013 02:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Robert!

quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
Do you know any human-rated launch systems (that go into orbit) where the crew actually flies the rocket?

Not often a crew has absolutely no verbal communication with the ground or each other during ascent. Just smile and wave, you three, smile and wave.

Ronpur
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posted 06-12-2013 05:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glint:
Right. What's the point in having the strap-ons separate in the first place when the stage is being jettisoned already?

It really seamed odd. They could just attach the strap-ons and not bother with the weight of the seperation hardware.

SkyMan1958
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posted 06-12-2013 10:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a portion of an article in the (China) People's Daily talking about China's space dream, including an interesting quote from Yang Liwei, the first Chinese astronaut regarding communism. While I am glad that the Chinese are moving into space, I can not stand communism:
The three-member crew were all veteran Air Force pilots before being selected as astronauts. Nie is the first general visiting space while his teammate Wang Yaping is China's first space traveler born in the 1980s, a generation growing up in era of reform and opening up.

All of them are members of the Communist Party of China.

Yang Liwei, the country's first astronaut, once told Xinhua that Chinese astronauts might not pray like their foreign counterparts do before they set off on a space mission; however, Communism, as their shared faith, supports them.

"If the country has its own space station, Chinese astronauts, who are Party members, might set up a Party branch up there," Yang said.

dom
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posted 06-12-2013 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just words. China dropped all its hardline Communist ideology in 1979 and is now just a vast corporate state - which suits capitalists such as Henry Kissinger just fine. This quote is just another example of what astronauts have to say to keep politicians happy. I wouldn't read anything sinister into it!

SkyMan1958
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posted 06-12-2013 03:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would agree that it is something that the astronaut(s) had to say. After all, the Soviet cosmonauts said similar things in their time, and the US astronauts certainly have made "Mom and Apple Pie" statements. I also would agree that communism as an economic system is dead in China.

However, words DO mean something and the communist system IS a dictatorship. I would wonder what the dead people at Tiananmen square in 1989 or the assorted political detainees of today would say to your comment that China dropped all it's hardline ideology in 1979. Obviously we can all debate the merits of the western democratic system given the US' and Western Europe's inability to push through needed reforms, but that is just the point... we CAN, for the most part, debate the issues without getting sent to jail or shot.

issman1
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posted 06-12-2013 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Perhaps that first glimpse of Earth from the windows of Shenzhou 10 rendered any prepared Chinese government statement inconsequential. Reaching outer space is an active astronaut's dream, so perhaps towing the party line is perfunctory?

How tragic that in June 2013 the human population of low earth orbit was briefly nine - yet deliberately and physically separated by petty geopolitics. Not sure if the three could see the other six or exchange pleasantries. This, I can not stand.

dom
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posted 06-12-2013 05:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Point taken on the current Chinese establishment (repression is repression whatever the ideology) but I believe spaceflight has the potential to bring humanity together in the future. Unless we revert to type and create new differences throughout the Solar System

For the moment, let's just wish the Taikonauts a safe flight!

MrSpace86
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posted 06-13-2013 07:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MrSpace86   Click Here to Email MrSpace86     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think it would be a wonderful gesture to have the Shenzhou visit the ISS. Granted they would have to redesign most of the docking mechanism, but it would be possible. As stated by a previous poster, low earth orbit was "shared" by nine people yet divided by politics.

Also, seems a lot of people were present at this launch compared to the earlier flights. Is the Chinese Agency opening up? Any site that has behind the scenes photos of training, or the assembly of the spacecraft?

Glint
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posted 06-13-2013 08:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
CCTV reports faring fragments were found near Yulin in Shaanxi Province. Article includes photos.

Edit: A piece of the launch escape system?

328KF
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posted 06-13-2013 10:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Given the number of bystanders in the photos of the debris, it appears that they allow these parts to fall in a somewhat populated area.

Let's see...Yulin, Shaanxi, China...

Population: 3,380,000

Wow! How about that range safety!

Glint
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posted 06-13-2013 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yeah, how about that!

The article tries making a point that the drop was precisely planned not to hit anyone or anything near the metro area. The "fairing fell off and dropped to a predetermined area sixteen minutes after the launch" (emphasis added).

onesmallstep
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posted 06-13-2013 02:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for onesmallstep   Click Here to Email onesmallstep     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MrSpace86:
Any site that has behind the scenes photos of training, or the assembly of the spacecraft?
Try the Facebook page of the Space Shuttle Almanac. Excellent coverage of all phases leading up to docking.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-13-2013 02:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The images they have posted seem to be all from the Xinhua state news service, as reproduced by CCTV and People's Daily. If so, might as well go to the source.

cspg
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posted 06-13-2013 02:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glint:
The article tries making a point that the drop was precisely planned not to hit anyone or anything near the metro area.
So why this is making me laugh?

Glint
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posted 06-13-2013 02:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm looking for a video likely showing the smiling crew quietly sitting, occasionally flipping through a manual or magazine, and waving nonchalantly to the camera during the automated docking sequence?

Despite such hard work, they did find time to relax, while facing new dangers:

The three astronauts on board Shenzhou X have increased food choices and a more relaxed work schedule, but may also face new risks.

Nie Haisheng, Zhang Xiaoguang and Wang Yaping will celebrate Dragon Boat Festival on Wednesday with the traditional sticky rice dumplings known as "zongzi".

Glint
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posted 06-19-2013 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to Xinhua, the live lecture from Shenzhou X has been scheduled for "10 a.m. on Thursday." I presume the time is stated in China Standard Time (UTC+8 hours, or 22:00 EDT tonight).

Apparently the closed circuit video will be broadcast live by China Central Television, although I don't see it listed on the schedule for the English language version.

dom
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posted 06-20-2013 04:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The BBC reported on the space lecture here.

The picture quality of the broadcast was excellent and the host was also easy on the eye.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-25-2013 07:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Shenzhou 10 landed safely in Inner Mongolia on Tuesday (June 25) at about 8:07 p.m. EDT (0007 GMT June 26).

Tonyq
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posted 06-26-2013 10:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tonyq   Click Here to Email Tonyq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dom:
The picture quality of the broadcast was excellent and the host was also easy on the eye.
Yes Dom, Major Wang is very easy on the eye.

I wonder if BIS funds will run to getting her to pitch up to the 2014 Russia/China forum. I would definitely make a superhuman effort to get there!!

Delta7
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posted 06-26-2013 11:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So what's next for the Chinese? Any idea of what Shenzhou 11 will entail?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-26-2013 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tiangong-2 is expected to be launched sometime in 2015. Until then, there are no manned or unmanned Shenzhou flights planned.

East-Frisian
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posted 06-26-2013 11:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for East-Frisian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congrats for the crew.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-26-2013 11:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jeff Foust at SpaceToday.net makes an observation about this mission:
The mission got relatively little coverage in Chinese media beyond [Wang Yaping's live video] lesson...
Shenzhou 10 also received considerably less attention by international media than did Shenzhou 9.

Part of that, I suppose, can be be attributed to Shenzhou 10 having basically repeated what Shenzhou 9 first achieved — rendezvous and docking (twice) and onboard experiments (as well as a woman on the crew). But something that was said by one of CCTV's (English) commentators has left me wondering if there was not a more concerted effort by China to downplay this flight.

During the Shenzhou 10 launch, a commentator mentioned that she was excited to see the liftoff, though she remarked, she felt she shouldn't be — that spaceflight is now becoming routine for China, and that eventually there should be no interest in the missions.

Now, it could have been simply her opinion, but as this was state-run television, it got me to thinking about whether China no longer desires the public's attention.

All times are CT (US)

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