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Author Topic:   North Korean rocket and satellite launches
SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
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posted 02-15-2009 10:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Associated Press is reporting the North Koreans are preparing to launch their first satellite.
North Korea suggested Monday it is preparing a rocket launch, claiming the country has the right to "space development" — a term Pyongyang has used in the past to disguise a long-range missile test as a satellite launch.

Pyongyang's official Korean Central News Agency made the suggestion on the 67th birthday of leader Kim Jong Il, and accused the United States and other countries of trying to block the country's "peaceful scientific research" by linking it to a long-range missile test.

"One will come to know later what will be launched" from North Korea, KCNA said, claiming that "hostile forces spread the rumor about" the country's "preparations for launching a long-distance missile."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-12-2009 08:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yonhap News: N. Korea said to be preparing for rocket launch between April 4-8
North Korea has informed an international organization on shipping safety that it will fire a rocket carrying a "satellite" between April 4-8, an intelligence source here said Thursday.

"North Korea informed the International Maritime Organization (IMO) of its plan to launch the Kwangmyongsong-2 between April 4-8," the source told Yonhap News Agency.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-25-2009 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
AP: US: North Korea loading rocket on launch pad
North Korea is loading a Taepodong rocket on its east coast launch pad in anticipation of the launch of a communications satellite early next month, U.S. officials say.

U.S. counterproliferation and intelligence officials have confirmed Japanese news reports of the expected launch between April 4 and 8.

...analysts have been watching for signs of a satellite or missile on the launch pad in Musudan-ni, the northeast coastal launch site. Satellite imagery from March 16 showed progress toward mounting a rocket, with a crane hovering over the launch pad, said Christian LeMiere, an editor at Jane's Intelligence Review in London.

He said that once mounted, scientists would need at least a week to fuel and carry out tests before any launch. Images from earlier this month did not indicate the rocket or missile had been mounted, he said Wednesday.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2009 09:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yonhap News Agency: N. Korea fires long-range rocket
North Korea fired off a multistage rocket from a base along its east coast on Sunday, a senior South Korean foreign ministry official confirmed.

The blast-off occurred at around 11:30 a.m. and seems to have flown over Japan, the official told Yonhap News Agency, asking not to be named.

Update:
South Korea's presidential office confirmed North Korea launched its long-range rocket 15 seconds past 11:30 a.m. Sunday, but said it was too early to call the launch a success.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-04-2009 10:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yonhap News Agency: S. Korea believes N. Korea's rocket carried satellite
A top South Korean government official said North Korea's rocket appears to have carried a satellite but Seoul is still checking whether a satellite has been put in orbit.

"We believe North Korea fired a rocket carrying a satellite," the official told Yonhap News Agency. "However, it does not necessarily mean that the launch was a success."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-05-2009 10:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Korean Central News Agency (North Korea):
Scientists and technicians of the DPRK (North Korea) have succeeded in putting satellite Kwangmyongsong-2, an experimental communications satellite, into orbit by means of carrier rocket Unha-2 under the state's long-term plan for the development of outer space.

Unha-2, which was launched at the Tonghae Satellite Launching Ground in Hwadae County, North Hamgyong Province at 11:20 (0220 GMT) on April 5, accurately put Kwangmyongsong-2 into its orbit at 11:29:02, nine minutes and two seconds after its launch.

The satellite is going round the earth along its elliptic orbit at the angle of inclination of 40.6 degrees at 490 km perigee and 1,426 km apogee. Its cycle is 104 minutes and 12 seconds.

Mounted on the satellite are necessary measuring devices and communications apparatuses.

The satellite is going round on its routine orbit.

It is sending to the earth the melodies of the immortal revolutionary paeans 'Song of General Kim Il-sung' and 'Song of General Kim Jong-il' and measured information at 470 MHz. By the use of the satellite the relay communications is now underway by UHF frequency band.

The satellite is of decisive significance in promoting the scientific researches into the peaceful use of outer space and solving scientific and technological problems for the launch of practical satellites in the future.

Carrier rocket Unha-2 has three stages.

The carrier rocket and the satellite developed by the indigenous wisdom and technology are the shining results gained in the efforts to develop the nation's space science and technology on a higher level.

The successful satellite launch is symbolic of the leaping advance made in the nation's space science and technology was conducted against the background of the stirring period when a high-pitched drive for bringing about a fresh great revolutionary surge is under way throughout the country to open the gate to a great prosperous and powerful nation without fail by 2012, the centenary of the birth of President Kim Il-sung, under the far-reaching plan of leader Kim Jong-il.

This is powerfully encouraging the Korean people all out in the general advance.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-05-2009 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yonhap News: S. Korea, U.S. say North Korea failed to orbit satellite
North Korea failed to send a satellite into space, South Korea and the United States said Sunday, declaring no object entered orbit.

North Korea said earlier in the day that it has succeeded in orbiting a communications satellite after launching a rocket from a launch pad on its east coast.

South Korean Defense Minister Lee Sang-hee disputed the claim, telling a National Assembly hearing that the three-stage rocket failed to put anything in orbit.

U.S. Northern Command:
NORAD and USNORTHCOM monitor North Korean launch

North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command officials acknowledged today that North Korea launched a Taepo Dong 2 missile at 10:30 p.m. EDT Saturday which passed over the Sea of Japan/East Sea and the nation of Japan.

Stage one of the missile fell into the Sea of Japan/East Sea. The remaining stages along with the payload itself landed in the Pacific Ocean.

No object entered orbit and no debris fell on Japan.

NORAD and USNORTHCOM assessed the space launch vehicle as not a threat to North America or Hawaii and took no action in response to this launch.

This is all of the information that will be provided by NORAD and USNORTHCOM pertaining to the launch.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-05-2009 12:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
BBC has launch photos: In pictures: North Korea space launch

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-08-2012 09:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
North Korea is preparing for its third satellite launch attempt, AFP reports, installing a long-range rocket on its launch platform on Sunday (April 8, 2012).
The rocket would propel the Kwangmyongsong-3 (Shining Star) satellite into orbit to observe the earth and collect data on forests and natural resources in impoverished but nuclear-armed North Korea, officials said.
The usually secretive nation organized an unprecedented visit for foreign reporters to the Tongchang-ri space centre, including space historian James Oberg.
We are visiting the launch site and other mission preparation facilities, we're taking photographs and videos, and our hosts will try to convince the world through us of the reality of the "peaceful satellite" that is mounted atop the Unha-3 booster at the Koreans' new launch site in the far northwestern corner of the country.

The fact that the North Koreans are looking for this kind of outside verification is a welcome sign. Yet even now, progress remains slow. The launch is only days away, but until now there have been no photographs or even drawings of the satellite whose existence we are supposed to validate.

Cozmosis22
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From: Texas * Earth
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posted 04-11-2012 01:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They finally let Oberg and the NBC News crew get a look at their satellite. It appears to be about a 3' cube and supposedly weighs around 250lbs.
The satellite that North Korean officials say will be launched with the country's Unha-3 rocket, slated for liftoff between April 12-16, is shown to the media at Sohae Satellite Station in Tongchang-ri, North Korea on April 8.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-11-2012 05:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Korean Central News Agency of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) describes the satellite, known as Kwangmyongsong-3, as an Earth-observing satellite, reports Nature.
The satellite looks remarkably similar to South Korea's first satellite, which was launched in 1992, but there's no way to tell what it's actual capabilities might be, says Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and a rocket enthusiast. The one thing McDowell is sure of is that it would make a lousy spy satellite. "We're talking kilometre or, at best, hundred-metre resolution," he says. In other words, they would be better off doing their spying on Google Earth.

SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
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posted 04-11-2012 07:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The payload is less germaine then the ability for the North Korean's to validate successful operation of a mufti-stage long range launch system, which if successful can be leveraged to deliver weapons and sold to other countries (i.e. Iran) for hard currency.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-11-2012 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The same could be said about Russia's launch of Sputnik. At the time, the development of the R-7 as an ICBM was considered much more important than any scientific payload.

It was not until after Sputnik was in space that Khrushchev saw the possibilities for national advancement through the peaceful activities of space exploration.

Obviously, the situation is not the same with North Korea, but it would also be wrong to wholesale discount the potential for a burgeoning space program to divert some of the country's more militaristic endeavors, especially if a success was applauded more broadly around the world.

gliderpilotuk
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posted 04-11-2012 12:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And more importantly, diverting the domestic population's attention from famine and third world conditions towards the "glory" of achievements promoted by "Dear Leader". You have to remember that this as much about internal propaganda and reinforcing "Dear Leader III", as it is about being a credible threat to anyone.

SpaceAholic
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From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
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posted 04-11-2012 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
...but it would also be wrong to wholesale discount the potential for a burgeoning space program to divert some of the country's more militaristic endeavors, especially if a success was applauded more broadly around the world.
Only those who subscribe to the North Korean government's interests and propensity for abhorrent behavior against its own populous would applaud a "successful" launch.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-12-2012 06:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to U.S. officials, North Korea's attempt at launching what the nation described as a weather satellite has failed, with the rocket breaking apart shortly after liftoff.

According to South Korea's defense ministry, the launch occurred at 07:39 a.m. Friday, April 13 (5:39 p.m. CDT, 2239 GMT Thursday, April 12).

Spaceguy5
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posted 04-12-2012 08:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spaceguy5   Click Here to Email Spaceguy5     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Based on what I've heard, it underwent a rapid unplanned disassembly about a minute after launch, breaking into 4 main pieces, and fell into the Yellow Sea. It had a peak altitude of about 120 km.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-12-2012 09:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
White House statement
Despite the failure of its attempted missile launch, North Korea's provocative action threatens regional security, violates international law and contravenes its own recent commitments. While this action is not surprising given North Korea's pattern of aggressive behavior, any missile activity by North Korea is of concern to the international community. The United States remains vigilant in the face of North Korean provocations, and is fully committed to the security our allies in the region.

The President has been clear that he is prepared to engage constructively with North Korea. However, he has also insisted that North Korea live up to its own commitments, adhere to its international obligations and deal peacefully with its neighbors.

North Korea is only further isolating itself by engaging in provocative acts, and is wasting its money on weapons and propaganda displays while the North Korean people go hungry. North Korea's long-standing development of missiles and pursuit of nuclear weapons have not brought it security — and never will. North Korea will only show strength and find security by abiding by international law, living up to its obligations, and by working to feed its citizens, to educate its children, and to win the trust of its neighbors.

SkyMan1958
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posted 04-12-2012 09:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Regarding this whole North Korea missile launch, I would recommend reading "Asia's Space Race" by James C. Moltz.

Moltz works at the Naval Postgraduate School. The book breaks down the Asian Space competition by looking at what the various nations are doing. China, India, and Japan are the big three, but the book also spends some time on South and North Korea, and quite a few others.

The book is a bit dry, and somewhat repetitive, but it's got a fair amount of interesting information.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-13-2012 06:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
North Korea's state news agency, the Korean Central News Agency, issued this statement:
DPRK's Satellite Fails to Enter Its Orbit

The DPRK launched its first application satellite Kwangmyongsong-3 at the Sohae Satellite Launching Station in Cholsan County, North Phyongan Province at 07:38:55 a.m. on Friday.

The earth observation satellite failed to enter its preset orbit.

Scientists, technicians and experts are now looking into the cause of the failure.

gliderpilotuk
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posted 04-13-2012 07:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess Kwangmyongsong-3 just became Kaboom-myongsong-3.

cspg
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posted 12-12-2012 03:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
North Korea has apparently successfully placed a satellite into orbit:
The Unha-3 rocket lifted off just before 10 a.m. local time, and was detected heading south by a South Korean destroyer patrolling the Yellow Sea. Japanese officials said the first rocket stage fell into the Yellow Sea west of the Korean Peninsula; a second stage fell into the Philippine Sea hundreds of miles farther south.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, later confirmed that North Korea did appear to have put an object into space. "Initial indications are that the missile deployed an object that appeared to achieve orbit," NORAD said in a statement.

About two hours after the launch, North Korea's state media proclaimed it a success, prompting dancing in the streets of the capital. State media called it a "momentous event" in the country's scientific development.

minipci
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posted 12-12-2012 08:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for minipci     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess that "Supreme Leader" Kim Jong-Un can now legitimately be included in the pantheon of Space Explorers & Workers, as surely this was entirely his own work

issman1
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posted 12-12-2012 12:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wonder if China will offer North Korea a chance to participate in its space efforts? Highly unlikely both will ever become partners in the International Space Station. Team up with Iran and it's a Soviet-era troika to challenge NASA and ESA.

moorouge
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posted 12-13-2012 02:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to the BBC news item on North Korea's latest space effort, the launch trajectory took it south down the length of neighbour South Korea.

As far as I'm aware, most other nations either launch over the sea or over their own territory. So, what is the legal position in the event of a launch failure or the violation of air space before a stable orbit is reached?

Glint
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posted 12-13-2012 10:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This just in: North Korean Satellite Out of Control in Orbit: Reports

Also, predictions for passes are now linked on the main page at heavens-above. So far, no visible passes posted for my area.

In the meantime, the AP reports that the US [is] hesitant [in] condemning North Korean launch.

The Obama administration is drawing no "red line" for North Korea after a successful long-range rocket test, tempering the public condemnation to avoid raising tensions or possibly rewarding the reclusive communist nation with too much time in the global spotlight.
In other words, as others elsewhere on the web have already commented, when an administration leads from behind, it's hard to see what's ahead.

Max Q
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From: Whyalla South Australia
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posted 12-13-2012 01:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Max Q   Click Here to Email Max Q     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is there any word on how long its likely to stay up there and are any other satellites at risk?

Max Q
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From: Whyalla South Australia
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posted 12-13-2012 02:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Max Q   Click Here to Email Max Q     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I suggest its not out of control just orbiting Gangnam style... Sorry.

issman1
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posted 12-13-2012 02:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glint:
...when an administration leads from behind, it's hard to see what's ahead.

North Korea launches an inconsequential satellite to universal condemnation, while the US launches its space drone without a murmur.

Mike Dixon
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posted 12-13-2012 02:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
North Korea launches an inconsequential satellite to universal condemnation, while the US launches its space drone without a murmur.
You forgot the "Democratic People's Republic" bit.

issman1
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posted 12-13-2012 03:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's all too Cold War for my liking. What does the distant future hold? Demarcating the Moon as sovereign territory of nations X, Y and Z? That would be a pity.

Glint
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posted 12-14-2012 09:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by issman1:
North Korea launches an inconsequential satellite to universal condemnation, while the US launches its space drone without a murmur.
I'd say the difference is in the number of prior U.N. actions on each side expressing opposition to the respective events.

Glint
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posted 12-17-2012 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Guess that the still silent North Korean satellite isn't tumbling out of control after all.

Courageous North Korean Satellite an Honor to Proud North Korean People!

Does anyone else think that the bellowing news reader's pink dress at 0:46 makes her look like she got stuck after being shot halfway out of a cannon?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

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From: Houston, TX
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posted 12-21-2012 11:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Brian Weeden, a former U.S. Air Force officer and currently Technical Advisor to Secure World Foundation, a U.S.-based non-profit that works on space policy issues, writes for Wired's Danger Room that Almost Everything You’ve Heard About the North Korean Space Launch Is Wrong.
Last week, North Korea finally managed to put an object into orbit around the Earth after 14 years of trying. The event was greeted with hysterical headlines, about how the whole thing was a likely a missile test and most certainly a failure of Western intelligence. Most of those headlines were dead wrong.

There are many questions yet to be answered about this launch and what it means. Some of them will take weeks or months to determine, others may never be answered satisfactorily. But there’s enough information already in the public domain to answer basic questions about the launch. News flash: Most of the initial reports about it were total misfires.

Rusty B
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From: Sacramento, CA
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posted 01-22-2013 09:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rusty B   Click Here to Email Rusty B     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The South Korean military says part of the North Korean missile launched last month were made in China.
South Korea's military has analyzed pieces of the debris from the three-stage rocket, including a fuel tank that were salvaged in the Yellow Sea.

A military official says some of the parts appear to have been imported from five countries including China.

The official did not specify which part came from China but indicated the item bore Chinese writing.

All times are CT (US)

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