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  ESA - JAXA - China - International
  ESA's Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV)

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Author Topic:   ESA's Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV)
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2008 08:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
European Space Agency (ESA) video release
Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV)

In 2013, Vega will carry ESA's Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle into space. The vehicle will then return to Earth to test a range of enabling systems and technologies for atmospheric re-entry. The video shows computer-generated animations of the vehicle and its mission.

The IXV objectives are the design, development, manufacturing, and on-ground and in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system. Among the critical technologies of interest, special attention is being paid to: advanced instrumentation for aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics; thermal protection and hot-structures solutions; guidance, navigation and flight control through a combination of jets and aerodynamic flaps.

IXV will be launched in 2013 from Europe's spaceport at Kourou, French Guiana, using the new Vega small launch vehicle. After re-entering the Earth's atmosphere and being slowed down by air drag, IXV will descend by parachute and land in the Pacific Ocean to await recovery and post-flight analysis.

dom
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Registered: Aug 2001

posted 06-20-2013 10:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is this test vehicle paving the way for an ESA spaceplane/drone similar to the X-37B? From BBC News:
A successful "drop test" has been conducted on Europe's experimental re-entry vehicle, the IXV.

A 1:1 scale model was released from an altitude of 3km by a helicopter, and then descended to a splashdown in the Mediterranean on a parachute.

The IXV is a project of the European Space Agency that aims to develop an autonomous atmospheric re-entry system.

A flight model will be launched on a Vega rocket next year and will have to descend from an altitude of 420km.

The ultimate goal is to develop a vehicle not dissimilar to the American mini spy shuttle called the X-37B, which operates robotically in orbit for a period of time before making an automated return to a runway.

Europe's version will be developed under the name of Pride.

Editor's note: Threads merged.

cspg
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From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 06-25-2013 10:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
European Space Agency release
Safe splashdown for Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle

ESA's experimental reentry vehicle passed its milestone descent and landing test on Wednesday (June 21) at the Poligono Interforze Salto di Quirra off the east coast of Sardinia in Italy.

The full-scale Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) prototype was released from an altitude of 3000 m by a helicopter, falling to gain speed to mimic a space mission before parachute deployment. The parachute slowed IXV for a safe splashdown in the sea at a speed below 7 m/s.

This last step in a series of tests shows that IXV can be recovered safely after its mission into space.

The IXV project is developing and flight-testing the technologies and systems for Europe's future autonomous atmospheric reentry vehicles.

It will be launched by ESA next year on Vega, Europe's new small launcher, into a suborbital path. It will reenter the atmosphere as if from a low-orbit mission, testing new European reentry technologies during its hypersonic and supersonic flight phases.

Previous campaigns included several water impact tests at CNR–INSEAN, a marine-engineering research institute in Rome, Italy. An instrumented subscale prototype was released at various angles and speeds to assess the best configuration for minimum impact loads.

At the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona, USA, the multistage supersonic parachute was qualified up to the opening of the main subsonic stage.

Building on these, Wednesday's test started with the redeployment of the main subsonic parachute followed by: cutting the two ablative thermal protection covers of the parachute bridles, firing the 16 non-explosive actuators to release the four panels covering the floatation balloons, jettisoning the panels, detecting the water impact, deploying the beacons, and receiving the signal from the Cospas–Sarsat satellite network pinpointing the prototype bobbing in the sea.

An anomaly in inflating the balloons will be investigated. The vehicle was recovered from the sea and taken to land for detailed inspections and analysis.

This test highlights the importance of early inflight verification to secure a robust space vehicle design, confirming the technical direction and possibly suggesting further improvements.

An anomaly in inflating the balloons will be investigated. The vehicle was recovered from the sea and taken to land for detailed inspections and analysis.

This test highlights the importance of early inflight verification to secure a robust space vehicle design, confirming the technical direction and possibly suggesting further improvements.

"Our special thanks go to the Italian Defense and the Italian Aerospace Research Centre (CIRA) for the commitment and the excellence exhibited in performing complex air–sea–ground operations enabling the successful challenging descent and landing system test," noted Giorgio Tumino, IXV Programme Manager.

On IXV's flight next year, the suborbital vehicle will separate from its Vega launcher at an altitude of 320 km. IXV will coast to 430 km and then begin its reentry phase, recording an impressive amount of experiment data from a large number of conventional and advanced sensors.

The entry speed of around 7.5 km/s at an altitude of 120 km will create the same conditions as those for a vehicle returning from low orbit. The mission, lasting more than 2 hours, will end with splashdown in the Pacific Ocean to await recovery and analysis.

All times are CT (US)

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