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  JAXA's H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-1)

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Author Topic:   JAXA's H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-1)
Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-22-2008 11:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency release
The first model HTV was shown to the press

On April 17, 2008, a press review was held for the first model H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) (Technology Demonstration Model), which is an unmanned cargo transfer spacecraft to the International Space Station.

On display separately were the Pressurized Logistics Carrier for supply transportation, the Avionics Module for vehicle body control and the Propulsion Module which carries the propulsion system.

When the HTV is completed and fully equipped, it will be the largest spacecraft in Japan with a length of 10 meters and a weight of 16.5 tons.

After going through performance tests like the Thermal Vacuum Test and Acoustic Test, the first model HTV is scheduled for launch from Tanegashima on the H-IIB Launch Vehicle No. 1 (Test Model) in the summer of 2009.


Photo credit: JAXA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-31-2009 11:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV moved to the VAB! Final launch preparation phase

On August 30, 2009, the encapsulated HTV Demonstration Flight was transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB.) It will be loaded onto the H-IIB Launch Vehicle to be ready for the launch.
Launch of HTV-1 is scheduled for September 10, 2009 at 12:01 p.m. CDT.


Photo credit: JAXA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-10-2009 12:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
H-IIB moved to LP2

The H-IIB Launch Vehicle Test Flight was transported from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at 11:16 a.m. JST [9:16 p.m. CDT Wednesday) and arrived at the Launch Pad 2 (LP2) of the Yoshinobu Launch Complex at 11:48 a.m. [9:48 p.m. CDT].

Propellants will be loaded to be ready for launch at 2:01:46 a.m. on the 11th [12:01:46 p.m. CDT on the 10th].


Click image for live webcam. Credit: JAXA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-10-2009 11:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 given a "go" for terminal countdown

With the H-2B rocket fueled and ready, and radio frequency and attitude control system tests complete, JAXA flight controllers gave the green light to begin X-60 (T-60) minute terminal countdown operations at 00:53 JST (10:53 a.m. CDT).

Credit: JAXA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-10-2009 11:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
H-II Transfer Vehicle-1 (HTV-1) many firsts:
  • first foray into major orbital rendezvous by Japan
  • first launch to a manned space station by Japan
  • first launch of the 186-foot-tall H-2B booster
  • first unmanned vehicle with both pressurized and unpressurized cargo
  • first free-flyer to be captured by space station's Canadarm2
  • first unmanned vehicle to dock to U.S. segment of the space station
With credit to Spaceflight Now: Japanese space station mission holds many firsts

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-10-2009 12:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 launches Japan into a new era of spaceflight

The first H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-1) atop Japan's first H-2B rocket launched at 2:01:46 a.m. JST on September 11 (12:01:46 p.m. CDT, September 10) from the Tanegashima Space Center.

The launch vehicle flew smoothly, and, at about 15 minutes and 10 seconds after liftoff, the separation of HTV-1 was confirmed.


Credit: JAXA/NASA TV

Carrying about 3.5 tons of pressurized and unpressurized supplies to the International Space Station, HTV-1 is scheduled to be captured and attached to the outpost on Thursday, September 17, using the station's robotic arm.


Credit: JAXA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-10-2009 08:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV in Good Health

After establishing the communications with the ground, HTV-1 has successfully established two-axis attitude control at 2:42 a.m. [JST] and three-axis attitude control at 3:16 a.m. September 11.

The HTV Flight Control Team (HTV FCT) has now been checking the telemetries of the HTV-1's subsystems in preparation for the first rendezvous maneuver planned on [flight day two] around 9:30 a.m. September 11.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-11-2009 05:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 Mission Flight Day 2

The HTV-1, inserted into the planned elliptical orbit on FD1, has been continuing a smooth flight on FD2.

Today, the HTV-1 performed the first rendezvous maneuver at 9:33 a.m. [JST] to raise its orbital altitude toward the ISS. Approximately two hours later, the HTV-1 reached the targeted orbit.

While flying in this orbit, the HTV-1 will perform demonstration tests planned on FD3.

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posted 09-12-2009 02:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ShuttleDiscovery   Click Here to Email ShuttleDiscovery     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's amazing to think that last year I was at that launch pad, and now it's actually been used for the H-2B!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-12-2009 02:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
CAM Demonstration Concluded with Great Success

The Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) demonstration went quite smoothly. The last maneuver took place at 4:34 p.m. [JST], September 12, and with that, the HTV-1 concluded all the CAM tests.

The HTV-1's systems functioned well throughout the demonstration, proving that the HTV-1 could safely move away from the International Space Station (ISS) in case of any emergency during its final rendezvous phase. The data obtained during today's demonstration will be reviewed at NASA's ISS Mission Management Team (IMMT) meeting on FD6 for approval for the HTV-1's final approach to the ISS.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-14-2009 11:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 Maintains Smooth Flight

Flight Day 5 (FD5), the HTV-1 is continuing the smooth flight.

Tomorrow, Flight Day 6 (FD6), the result of the HTV-1 demonstration tests will be reviewed at the ISS Mission Management Team (IMMT) meeting. In the meeting, safety and flight control abilities of the HTV-1 will be assessed based on the data collected during the demonstration tests conducted on FD3.

When the IMMT gives an approval for the HTV-1's final rendezvous approach, the HTV-1 is set to perform the first Height Adjustment Maneuver (HAM) on FD7 toward the ISS.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 02:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
Live reports of the HTV final approach to the ISS

The H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Demonstration Flight, which was launched by the H-IIB Launch Vehicle at 2:01:46 a.m. on September 11 [JST] has been smoothly flying on its scheduled course.

Its final approach to the International Space Station (ISS) was approved at the ISS Mission Management Team (IMMT) meeting on September 15, thus, from the 16th, the altitude of the HTV will be maneuvered to gradually approach the ISS.

The HTV is scheduled to be berthed at the ISS on Sept. 18 (Fri.).

JAXA will broadcast the live reports of the ISS robotic arm capturing the HTV and the berthing of the HTV at the ISS.

NASA TV coverage of the HTV grapple and berthing is scheduled to begin at 2:00 p.m. CDT Thursday, Sept. 17. Grapple is scheduled for 2:50 p.m.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 01:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 arrived at 300m below the ISS (Hold Point)

The HTV-1 arrived at 300m below the ISS (Hold Point) at 1:48 a.m. September 18 [11:48 a.m CDT September 17]. There, the HTV will turn its attitude 180 degrees (yaw-around) to prepare for its contingency escape maneuver that may be required during the rest of approach phase.
NASA TV coverage of the HTV grapple and berthing is scheduled to begin at 2:00 p.m. CDT Thursday, Sept. 17. Grapple is scheduled for 2:50 p.m.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 01:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 resumed approach from Hold Point

The HTV-1 departed from the Hold Point at 2:55 a.m. September 18 [12:55 p.m. CDT September 17] and resumed its approach. About one hour later, the HTV-1 will halt its approach again at 30m below the ISS (Parking Point).
NASA TV coverage of the HTV grapple and berthing is scheduled to begin at 2:00 p.m. CDT Thursday, Sept. 17. Grapple is scheduled for 2:50 p.m.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 arrived at 30m below the ISS (Parking Point)

The HTV-1 arrived at 30m below the ISS (Parking Point) at 3:44 a.m. September 18 (1:44 p.m. CDT September 17]. The HTV-1 halted at the Parking Point for final checks and to receive approval to proceed to a point 10m below the ISS, a grappling position called "Berthing Point".
Grapple continues to be scheduled for 2:50 p.m. CDT.


Credit: NASA TV/collectSPACE

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 02:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 resumed approach from Parking Point

The HTV-1 departed from Parking Point at 4:05 a.m. September 18 [2:05 p.m. CDT September 17] and resumed its approach. About 20 minutes later, the HTV-1 will reach 10m below the ISS, a grappling position called "Berthing Point".


Credit: NASA TV/collectSPACE

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 02:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 captured by the station's robotic arm

The HTV-1, which has been in a free drift state at the Berthing Point, was successfully captured by the station's robotic arm (SSRMS) operated by the ISS Expedition 20 Flight Engineer Nicole Stott at 4:47 a.m. September 18 [2:47 p.m. CDT September 17]. At 4:51 a.m. September 18 [2:51 p.m. CDT September 17], the capture completed as snare cables inside the latching end effector (LEE) of the station's robotic arm have finished rigidizing.

Credit: NASA TV

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-17-2009 05:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
Japanese Cargo Craft Docked with Station

The unpiloted Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) arrived at the International Space Station Thursday and was attached at 5:26 p.m. CDT using the station's robotic arm.

Flight Engineers Nicole Stott, Robert Thirsk and Frank De Winne used the station's robotic arm to grab the cargo craft and attach it to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony node.

After the activation of the HTV subsystems, Thirsk and De Winne will perform vestibule outfitting procedures to prepare it for ingress and unloading.


Credit: NASA TV

cspg
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posted 09-17-2009 11:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So Japan's HTV does not (yet?) have the capability to automatically dock with the ISS like Europe's ATV? Is such capability planned for future HTV's?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-18-2009 12:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA designed the HTV to be captured by the station's robotic arm so that it could be docked to a U.S. segment common berthing mechanism, allowing a larger hatch capable of supporting full ISS science experiment and equipment racks.

Roscosmos' Progress and ESA's ATV dock autonomously with the Russian side of the station, but their cargo-size is limited by their smaller hatches.

Both SpaceX and Orbital will use the same free-flyer approach to deliver supplies.

cspg
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posted 09-18-2009 08:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks! Very interesting to note the different approaches to ISS resupply missions. That begs the question as to why Europe decided to develop such capability.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-18-2009 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Both the ATV and HTV, like the U.S. commercial cargo craft, could form the basis for crewed spacecraft. ESA has early plans that show follow-on ATV designs with crew cabins and concepts that demonstrate how ATV could support supply delivery to lunar orbit.

Just after yesterday's HTV-1 capture, I interviewed Soichi Noguchi about his upcoming flight to the International Space Station. He is JAXA's first astronaut to fly as a flight engineer aboard Soyuz. He hopes his experience can be applied in the future to a piloted follow-on to the HTV.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-20-2009 08:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Photographs taken from aboard the space station of HTV-1's arrival:


Credit: NASA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-23-2009 04:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Photographs of HTV-1's pressurized interior:


Credit: NASA

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-17-2009 11:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA HTV-1 update
HTV-1 to undock on October 30

On September 23, the HTV-1 Exposed Pallet (EP) was installed on Kibo's Exposed Facility (EF). The station's robotic arm grappled and retrieved the pallet from the Unpressurized Logistics Carrier (ULC), which then handed it off to Kibo's robotic arm to be berthed on the Japanese lab's porch.


Credit: NASA TV

On September 24, the two exposed experiment payloads, called SMILES and HREP, which had been carried to the ISS on the EP, were removed and installed on the EF. Both scientific payloads are earth observation experiments designed to monitor our planet's atmosphere and coastal features.

The EP was unberthed from the Exposed Facility with Kibo's robotic arm (JEMRMS) on September 25. The pallet was then handed off to the station's robotic arm, which reinstalled it in the ULC.


Credit: NASA TV

With the pallet stowed, all activities planned outside of the ISS during the HTV-1's berthed operation were completed.

Inside the station, crew members continued transferring supplies between the HTV Pressurized Logistics Carrier (PLC) and the ISS. Before undocking, the PLC will be loaded with trash and other items ot be discarded.

On October 30, the station's arm will unberth the HTV, which will then maneuver away to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere and burn up over the Pacific Ocean.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-01-2009 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
Japanese Cargo Craft Leaves Station

Japan’s first cargo vehicle, the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), has left the International Space Station. Flight Engineer and robotic arm operator Nicole Stott released the HTV from the grip of Canadarm2 at 1:32 p.m. EDT on Friday, October 30. The HTV’s thrusters fired about five minutes later separating the craft from the station for a series of three deorbit maneuvers on Sunday.


Credit: NASA TV

Release occurred as the HTV and the ISS flew 220 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Hawaii. The HTV will be disposing of about 1,600 pounds of trash and unneeded equipment when it is commanded to re-enter Earth’s atmosphere and burn up at 4:25 p.m. EST Sunday, November 1.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-01-2009 05:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JAXA press release
Successful Reentry of the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Demonstration Flight

The H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Demonstration Flight successfully re-entered the atmosphere after the third de-orbit maneuver at around 5:53 a.m. on November 2, 2009 (Japan Standard Time).

The HTV Demonstration Flight successfully accomplished its initial objective of shipping cargos to the International Space Station, and completed all its missions of about 52 days by today's reentry.

The estimated times for reentry and water landing are as follows (Times are Japan Standard Time):

  • Estimated reentry time*: around 6:26 a.m. on November 2 (Monday), 2009

  • Estimated water landing time: around 6:38 to 6:58 a.m. on November 2 (Monday), 2009
*Altitude at 120 km

All times are CT (US)

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