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Author Topic:   South Korean astronaut to fly to the ISS
MSS
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From: Kolo, Poland
Registered: May 2003

posted 04-04-2006 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MSS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Korea's Global TV Arirang: Korea Sets Out to Rear First Astronaut
The first-ever Korean will fly into space, as early as April, 2008.

The Science and Technology Ministry says it will begin a screening process next month, to nominate two Korean astronauts by the end of the year.

The ministry says any Korean over the age of 19 can be considered as a candidate.

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Maciej,
Astronauts & Cosmonauts & their flights

MSS
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From: Kolo, Poland
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posted 11-08-2006 03:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MSS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Arirang: Final 10 Candidates For Korea's 1st Astronaut to Be Named
A nationwide competition to choose the country's first astronaut is intensifying with the field to be narrowed by the end of next month to a final ten candidates.

Earlier this month, around 36 thousand initial hopefuls were whittled down to just 30.

The Science and Technology Ministry and the Korea Aerospace Research Institute say the final 10 will be announced around November 24th following in-depth physical exams, interviews, and tests conducted under simulated space environments.

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Maciej,
Astronauts & Cosmonauts & their flights

MSS
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From: Kolo, Poland
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posted 11-25-2006 01:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MSS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hankooki: Astronaut Candidates Shortlists to 10
The field of candidates vying to be South Korea's first astronaut has been reduced to 10 from over 36,000 people who initially applied to become a space traveler in early 2008.

The Ministry of Science and Technology Friday announced the 10-person list whittled down from 30 after the third-round of in-depth physical and mental check-ups were completed.

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Maciej,
Astronauts & Cosmonauts & their flights

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-25-2006 11:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Korea Times: Korean Will Go Into Space in 2008

In 2008, either a male Samsung researcher or a female Ph.D. student will travel into space, something no Korean has done before.

In a gala ceremony broadcast nationwide on SBS television Monday, the Ministry of Science and Technology picked a pair of candidates, one of whom will rocket to the International Space Station 15 months from now.

The winning pair are Ko San, 30, a researcher at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, and Yi So-yeon, 28, who is working on a Ph.D. at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST).

Additional articles from The Korea Times:

Philip
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posted 07-10-2007 12:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It looks like Soyuz TMA-12 in April 2008 will carry a Korean cosmonaut (male: Ko San or female: Soyeon Yi) to the ISS. It will be the first Russian flight since long to carry 3 rookies into orbit (last was Soyuz 7 in 1969).

Tonyq
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posted 09-04-2007 01:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tonyq   Click Here to Email Tonyq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The name of Korea's first astronaut will be announced at 11am Seoul time on Wednesday 5th September, by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology.

Either Soyeon Yi or Ko San will be named as Korea's choice to join the crew of Soyuz TMA-12 currently due to launch on 8th April 2008.

The selection will then be placed before MCOP for ratification later this month.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-04-2007 11:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Associated Press: South Korea taps robotics expert as 1st astronaut
South Korea announced that a 30-year-old robotics expert will be the country's first person in space when he flies on a Russian Soyuz capsule to the international space station early next year.

The Ministry of Science and Technology selected Ko San, who works at the Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Vice Science Minister Chung Yoon said.

eurospace
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posted 09-07-2007 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The same from the Korean News agency Yonhap.

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Jürgen P Esders
Berlin, Germany

International Director (Europe), Space Unit
Vice President, Weltraum Philatelie e. V.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Astroaddies

Philip
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posted 09-07-2007 01:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If Sergeï Volkov and Oleg Kononenko will constitute the Russian 'main' crew, it could be the first Russian flight to carry 3 rookies since Soyuz 7 back in 1969!

Tonyq
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posted 03-09-2008 03:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tonyq   Click Here to Email Tonyq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Breaking news guys...

This photo was on Reuters on Friday, Soyeon Yi training with prime crew.

...and today this on a Korean news website.

Signs have appeared that the Korean who is slated to become the first Korean in space, Ko San, will be replaced by his female backup Yi Soyeon.
Congratulations to Soyeon, who is actually now Dr. Soyeon Yi, having received her doctorate on 29th February.

eurospace
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posted 03-10-2008 08:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ko K.O. - Yi to go

Press reports in Germany confirm the swap of Korea's first spacefarer: Russia had requested Korea to replace Ko with his backup Yi. According to these reports, Ko was accused of having violated internal training rules.

According to these sources, Ko had allegedly shipped home a training manual by post, and was allegedly caught peeping into a Soyuz pilot's manual.

I always thought curiosity was a precondition for being an explorer, but apparently the So... Russians see it as spying...

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Jürgen P Esders
Berlin, Germany

International Director (Europe), Space Unit
Vice President, Weltraum Philatelie e. V.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Astroaddies

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-10-2008 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Asia Pulse: S. Korea's First Astronaut Into Space Will Be A Woman
The switch would make Yi So-yeon the second Asian woman to go into space, following Chiaki Mukai of Japan who made two trips into orbit in the 1990s.

"The main reason for the change is based on two consecutive violations of training protocol by Ko," said Lee Sang-mok, the head of the ministry's Space Technology Bureau. According to reports, Ko mistakenly sent a mission training manual home along with his personal belongings last September, but it was sent back immediately.

Last month he gained possesion of a spacecraft pilot's instructions that he was not authorized to read. "Ko was aware of the rules and signed an agreement not to break them on entering the program, Lee said.

"Ko, however, will not be penalized for being made the backup astronaut and no changes will be made to his current status as senior researcher at KARI," the expert said.

space4u
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posted 03-10-2008 09:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for space4u   Click Here to Email space4u     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, the New York Times is reporting the change as well.

But, of course, I read it here on collectSPACE first. Thanks Tony

--Marcy

cspg
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posted 03-10-2008 10:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Being "crazy, sexy and cool" actually paid off?

Good. There aren't enough women in the space program! So the other one was caught "spying"?

Chris.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-10-2008 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
The switch would make Yi So-yeon the second Asian woman to go into space, following Chiaki Mukai of Japan who made two trips into orbit in the 1990s.
Yi will also be the 50th woman worldwide to launch towards space (and the 49th to reach orbit).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-10-2008 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
So the other one was caught "spying"?
From the reports now coming out of Korea, it sounds less of an issue of sensitive material leaving Russia and more of a concern by trainers that Ko could not follow basic rules and what they might imply for his performance in the Soyuz and on-orbit.

Lee Sang-mok, the head of the South Korean ministry's space technology bureau, considered both of Ko's offending acts as unintentional, but "explained that the Russians regard abiding by the rules as critical since even a small and innocent mistake could lead to serious consequences in space." (Source: Korea Times)

While I am very happy to see Yi fly, as when I met her, she came across as both personable and studious, I am also disappointed for Ko. It was very easy to hear the enthusiasm he had for his flight and the honor he felt representing his family, friends and entire nation. I cannot imagine coming that close to flying in space and having it slip through your fingers because of two relatively minor mistakes.

eurospace
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posted 03-10-2008 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
The switch would make Yi So-yeon the second Asian woman to go into space, following Chiaki Mukai of Japan who made two trips into orbit in the 1990s.
Not exactly: Yonhap claims that Yi So-yeon will be the 2nd Asian female into space after the Japanese astronaut Chiaki Mukai. As usual though, Yonhap is incorrect because there has been other Asian women in space such as Indian born American Kalpana Chawla. There has even been another Asian female space tourist who went up with the Russians just like Yi So-yeon is going to. Iranian born American, Anousheh Ansari blasted off into space with the Russians back in 2006. Last time I checked India and Iran were both in Asia.

------------------
Jürgen P Esders
Berlin, Germany

International Director (Europe), Space Unit
Vice President, Weltraum Philatelie e. V.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Astroaddies

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-10-2008 02:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by eurospace:
Last time I checked India and Iran were both in Asia.
While true, it appears the definition of "Asian" varies based on where you reside. Quoting Wikipedia (for convenience):
The use of the term varies by country and person, often referring to people from a particular region or subregion of Asia. Though it may be based on residence, it is also often considered a "race" or an "ethnic group".

In the United States, Canada, and Australia, the term refers most commonly to people of predominantly East Asian or Southeast Asian ancestry; however in the United Kingdom and Anglophone Africa, the term refers most commonly to South Asians. In other countries, the term is applied to all people from Asia in general. In the US, however, Middle Eastern and Central Asian people are usually not considered Asian peoples.

eurospace
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posted 03-10-2008 02:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
While true, it appears the definition of "Asian" varies based on where you reside.
I'd rather say it depends on where these people live or were born - and that is undoubtedly geographically and ethnically in Asia.

After all, Columbus thought he discovered "India" and the "Indians" ...ever since, the rest of the World is fairly tolerant with the geographical perception of those who followed him into this newly discovered continent... and no, we don't consider Americans are "Indians" and thus Asians.

Speaking of which: quite a few members of the Russian cosmonaut corps would qualify as Asian: Salizhan Sharipov from Kyrgyztan, Talgat Musabayev and Tokhtar Aubakirov from Kazakstan. What do with Vladimir Dzhanibekov, of Russian ethnicity, but born in Uzbekistan? Alexander Viktorenko, equally Russian, but born in Kazakstan?

------------------
Jürgen P Esders
Berlin, Germany

International Director (Europe), Space Unit
Vice President, Weltraum Philatelie e. V.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Astroaddies

FFrench
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posted 03-10-2008 09:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert:
While true, it appears the definition of "Asian" varies based on where you reside.
Quite correct - as I found when moving from England (where "Asian" is generally used to mean people from the India-Pakistan-Bangladesh-Sri Lanka area), to the USA, (where "Asian" generally means people from China-Japan-Vietnam, etc.). In neither place is the word considered to encompass the entire Asian continent. Calling, for example, a Turkish person "Asian" in either country would cause nothing but confusion, as it is not what the word means in either place.

Therefore, for an American source (Yahoo) to call her the "second Asian" is perfectly correct. It would make less sense if reported that way by a news agency of a different part of the world, and the Yahoo story may indeed be confusing to non-Americans reading it. Nevertheless, for the people who wrote it and the audience it is intended for, it is perfectly correct, as that is the meaning of the word here.

Philip
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posted 03-11-2008 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Still no crew photo...

dom
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posted 03-11-2008 02:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I feel very sorry for the guy. Paraphrasing Henry Kissinger in the movie Nixon: 'To be brought down by a third-rate burglary is a tragedy of epic proportions'

Bizarrely she is now the second female back-up to get an unexpected Soyuz seat just before a mission. Iranian-American woman Anousheh Ansari replaced Japanese space tourist Daisuke Enomoto at the last minute when he failed a medical in 2006.

Like Ansari's good fortune then I feel happy for Yi So-Yeon too.

kyra
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posted 03-11-2008 06:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While I'm happy for Yi So-Yeon, the reasons for demoting her partner expose a key flaw in the Russian program with regards to training materials.

At NASA, every crewmember is given complete training in the Flight Data File, whether they are responsible for a task or not. It helps the crew work better as a team, and it also promotes confidence and safety. The FDF is posted online for the interested public as well.

At Star City, however there is still a Cold War era "need to know" mentality that baffles me. NASA has found this lack of flow of information frustrating and at times potentially dangerous dating back to the days of Mir. The Familiarization manual for Soyuz was not printed until it was forced under contract as part of the Mir-Shuttle Program. If Russia wants to attract more international partnership, perhaps they should share more solid information and less rhetoric. Just my humble opinion, of course.

cspg
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posted 03-12-2008 01:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So if a Chinese taikonaut were to fly aboard the shuttle, he/she would have access to all shuttle-related technical material? And if so, he/she would be able to send the material home "by mistake" (yeah, right) only to have it ship back "immediately" (enough time to make copies)? Again if so, makes you wonder why recently an American engineer has been charged for spying for the Chinese...

Maybe the Russians do not want their "trade secrets" to be accessed by everybody, especially emerging space countries. Beside if you agree to fly aboard a Russian spacecraft and that you agree to abide by their rules, you stick to those rules or you have no place being there. He learnt it the hard way but I don't feel sorry for him. And I don't see where the flaw is. (of course that's based upon the information we have- there may be other "behind the scenes" events that took place and that we're not aware of; but if that's the reason (ie. trade/tech secrets, it's understandable; selling an Airbus A320 assembly line to the Chinese is not).

True the Russians may seem to be somewhat "paranoid" but, frankly, the "Wall" came down less than 20 years ago and you expect that almost 45 years of "cold war" being washed away just like that? Yesterday we were enemies (were we?) and suddenly overnight we're long-time buddies (are we?). Yeah right. Note, the same thing applies to Europe: you don't wash away centuries of history simply because you've decided to do so (ie. create a single "united" Europe by signing treaties). It's going to take time. A lot of time. Just my thoughts.

Chris.

issman1
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posted 03-12-2008 09:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am really glad for Yi but still curious about Ko's demotion. Seems to me the current tensions between the Kremlin and White House are to blame. As South Korea is a US "ally" perhaps Ko's actions were misintepreted as espionage? Either way, the more women in space the better!

Philip
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posted 03-20-2008 03:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
About time for the official crewphoto!

SPACEFACTS
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posted 03-20-2008 03:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SPACEFACTS   Click Here to Email SPACEFACTS     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Philip:
About time for the official crewphoto!
It is here.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-24-2008 11:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Telecoms Korea: Korea's First Astronaut to Return Home on Monday
Korea's first astronaut Yi So-yeon will return home early next week after completing her medical checkup and undergoing reassimilation training to normal gravity conditions, the government said Friday.

The Ministry of Education, Science and Technology said Yi and backup astronaut Ko San will arrive early Monday morning at Incheon International Airport.

Yi is expected to visit Education and Science Minister Kim Doh-yeon and hold a press conference and take part in various symposiums.

The 29-year-old bio-systems engineer is expected to visit the United Nations in early June to deliver the UN flag to the secretary general.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-29-2008 09:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yonhap News: S. Korean astronaut to cancel schedule
South Korea's first astronaut, Yi So-yeon, will cancel her entire schedule to rest and undergo medical tests, the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) said Monday.
Korea Times: Astronaut Yi Sick in Hospital
Korea's first astronaut Yi So-yeon was undergoing thorough medical examinations at an Air Force hospital due to the shock she suffered during her rough landing.

She was hospitalized at the Aerospace Medical Institution in Cheongju, North Chungcheong Province, Tuesday morning. Her original schedule, including a meeting with the science minister, was postponed indefinitely.

"We don't think she has any major health problems. But we have to wait for the results to decide on her schedule," said Jung Gyeong-taek, a manager at the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology.

Arriving at Incheon International Airport Monday morning, Yi looked exhausted and unwell, though she spoke in clear voice and smiled occasionally. The 29-year-old frowned and groaned when hugged by her enthusiastic mother, complaining that the pain in her back has not subsided.

"It seems that she received a shock to her neck, shoulders and back when she landed," Colonel Jung Gi-young was quoted as saying by the Munhwa Ilbo daily. He has been attending to Yi and Ko San, the backup astronaut, ever since they were selected for the space program. "X-rays showed that there are no broken bones. But we need to do more examinations to see whether she strained her muscles or nerves."

issman1
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posted 05-02-2008 06:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was quite surprised that Yi was hospitalised soon upon her return to South Korea.

Now it seems she suffered damage to her spine! Why was this not detected at Star City by the Russian space programme's own doctors, I wonder?

I was also surprised to read that Peggy Whitson was quite dismissive, almost patronisingly, of Yi's account of the TMA-11 ballistic entry.

I think if Yi was a space tourist she should ask for a partial refund!

issman1
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posted 05-14-2008 09:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to press reports Yi has been released from hospital after treatment for a back injury. I am astonished that some Western news outlets continue to report none of the Soyuz TMA-11 crew was hurt returning to Earth.

Clearly this is not factual. Would Yi be the first spaceflyer to have suffered physical injury as a result of spaceflight?

Delta7
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posted 05-14-2008 10:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by issman1:
Would Yi be the first spaceflyer to have suffered physical injury as a result of spaceflight?
Alan Bean suffered a cut on the forehead during the Apollo 12 splashdown. Vance Brand passed out momentarily due to a propellant fume leak into the CM during the ASTP re-entry.

Cosmonaut Boris Volynov broke teeth during his very hard Soyuz 5 landing. I believe Vasily Lazarev and Oleg Makarov suffered some relatively minor injuries as a result of the Soyuz 18 aborted launch and subsequent landing near the Sino-Soviet border in 1975.

Those are the ones that come to mind.

FFrench
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posted 05-14-2008 11:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Issman1:
Would Yi be the first spaceflyer to have suffered physical injury as a result of spaceflight?

After ejection from her spacecraft, Valentina Tereshkova was struck on the face by a small piece of metal, making a small cut and bruise on her face.

cspg
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posted 05-17-2008 01:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Korea Times: Ko San Suspects Spy Agencies for Space Mission Exist
Astronaut candidate Ko San said Friday that he didn't understand his sudden replacement in March on Korea's first mission to the International Space Station, and intimated that some spy agencies had meddled in the process.

All times are CT (US)

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