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  The moon in Earth-orbit spacewalk photos

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Author Topic:   The moon in Earth-orbit spacewalk photos
LM-12
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posted 06-17-2017 08:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't suppose there are too many times when an EVA photo taken in Earth orbit has by chance captured the moon in the background.

EVA-2 Hubble photo STS-103-710-7 is one example. This ISS Expedition 16 photo is another. There are probably more out there.

LM-12
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posted 06-18-2017 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
STS-88 photo s88e5058 is another good one.

LM-12
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posted 06-21-2017 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I found a few more, if anyone else is interested.

LM-12
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posted 10-22-2017 09:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The moon can be seen in one of the photos taken during the Apollo 9 EVA in 1969. Photo AS09-20-3058 shows the open CM hatch at left, lunar module pilot Rusty Schweickart's shadow and the distant moon.

heng44
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posted 10-22-2017 10:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You seem to notice a lot of things in photos that other miss, including myself. Very nice find.

LM-12
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posted 10-22-2017 11:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Ed. It's great that they had the foresight to well-document those early missions on film so we can still do stuff like this decades later.

LM-12
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posted 10-22-2017 10:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In these photos, the moon from Earth orbit looks a lot smaller than it does from the ground. Is that because of the camera lenses used to take the photos, or does the Earth's atmosphere just make the moon appear larger from the ground?

LM-12
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posted 10-23-2017 01:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Karen Nyberg commented on this (the size of the moon) in this tweet.

canyon42
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posted 10-24-2017 07:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The atmosphere has almost zero magnifying effect, with the exception of some things happening due to refraction when it is very close to the horizon. Otherwise, my guess as to why astronauts might perceive it as looking smaller is that there is nothing up around it to compare it to visually, with the exception of the whole entire huge Earth. The Earth is of course "visible" to us on the ground as well, but we likely edit it out of our awareness to a degree since it is always there — plus, there are additional visual cues such as buildings and trees and so on.

As far as photos go, the moon's apparent size in an image is going to be a direct result of whatever focal length lens is being used. For images that show a large swath of the Earth and/or the ISS, for example, a fairly wide-angle lens is probably being used, which will give a pretty small moon image.

LM-12
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posted 10-24-2017 09:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Photo STS-61B-45-043 is another EVA view of the moon. That is Jerry Ross.

The moon looks so much farther away in Earth-orbit photos. Hard to believe that is the same big, bright moon we see in the night sky. It's like an optical illusion. Thanks for the explanation.

canyon42
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posted 10-28-2017 04:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As a sort of corollary, think about how small the Earth looks in the photos it appears in taken from the surface of the moon, even though it is four times as large (in terms of diameter) as the moon is from our viewpoint. In the photos where it appears much bigger (such as the Apollo 8 Earthrise image) a longer lens was used.

LM-12
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posted 10-28-2017 08:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Perhaps the Earthrise view from the Kaguya spacecraft more closely resembles what it would look like to the unaided eye.

canyon42
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posted 10-29-2017 06:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's really cool.

LM-12
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posted 11-01-2017 01:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Gene Cernan on Gemini 9A managed to capture the moon on REV 32 in EVA photo S66-38062 which is looking aft at the adapter section.

From earlier in the EVA when Cernan was behind the adapter at the AMU:


Cernan: Who said this visor wouldn't fog up?

Stafford: Is it fogging on you?

Cernan: Yes.

Stafford: Okay.

Stafford: Understand visor is fogging. Okay. Next break, attach those temperature sensors if you can see them.

Stafford: You're going to have the moon back there in just a minute.

Cernan: Okay. I've got the temperature sensors on. I had them both on, and one fell off.

Stafford: Okay. Attach - unstow and attach to the controller arm in the following order: Oxygen hose - -

Cernan: I've got to take a rest, Tom.

LM-12
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posted 11-03-2017 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One of the deployed EVA handrails can be seen at top right. What is the metal tube extending from the adapter section?

LM-12
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posted 11-05-2017 07:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not an EVA photo, but the moon is also seen above the Gemini 7 spacecraft in Gemini 6A rendezvous photo S65-63183 taken on REV 5.

The moon phase seems to match the bright light seen in this night station-keeping photo of the Gemini 7 spacecraft.

CC: Gemini VI, Gemini VI, Houston CAP COM. How do you read?

Stafford: Loud and clear, Houston. Go ahead.

CC: Could you give us a report on your night station-keeping?

Stafford: No trouble at all. We're about 20 feet apart, using the docking lights and the cabin lights of the spacecraft.

CC: Roger. Understand no trouble at all. 20 feet apart. Using the docking lights on VI.

Stafford: We're using the docking lights from VI to illuminate - -

CC: Roger, understand. Docking lights on VI to illuminate VII.

LM-12
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posted 11-07-2017 09:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The black and white image of Gemini 7 is reversed.

LM-12
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posted 11-09-2017 04:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
At the end of the EVA on Gemini 9A, Gene Cernan retrieved the mirror on the docking bar. He took a few photos around sunset just before closing the hatch. Those photos are slightly out of focus, but seem to include views of the moon.

LM-12
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posted 11-13-2017 12:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There is a pan version of the Apollo 9 moon photo on this webpage.

Also, from the mission transcripts at 03 01 08 18 GET during the EVA:

Schweickart: Boy, oh boy; what a view!

Scott: Isn't that spectacular?

Schweickart: It really is. There's the moon right over there.

LM-12
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posted 11-14-2017 06:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They did not use consecutive frames 3057, 3058 and 3059 for that pan. And Schweickart's shadow is missing.

LM-12
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posted 11-16-2017 05:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Photo AS09-21-3280 is a bit out of focus, but that might be the moon in the upper right quadrant of the CM hatch window.

LM-12
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posted 11-18-2017 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
EVA photo iss041e067003 taken on Expedition 41 shows Reid Wiseman with the moon in the background.

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