Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Shuttles - Space Station
  STS-128: viewing, questions and comments (Page 2)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   STS-128: viewing, questions and comments
NightHawk117
Member

Posts: 298
From: Memphis, Tn
Registered: Oct 2006

posted 08-28-2009 03:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NightHawk117   Click Here to Email NightHawk117     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are there any popular launch spots in Ft. Lauderdale? Or is any part of the beach ok?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-28-2009 04:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You may see in launch shots that the flag at Kennedy Space Center today is at half-mast. It is in memory of Senator Kennedy.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-28-2009 09:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a quick screen cap recap of my Spaceflight Now webcast appearance:

music_space
Member

Posts: 1050
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 08-28-2009 09:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Robert on Florida Today's webcast: great! And that treadmill slat... woahhh!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-28-2009 10:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a quick screen cap recap of my Florida Today webcast appearance:

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 08-28-2009 10:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I missed the cast, but what the heck are those "Lucky Charm" marshmallow things that look like little space shuttles? Weird.

Well, sweating out the weather, trend is positive and all things are go for launch and RTLS. I HOPE it goes tonight. She looks dang pretty sitting on the pad in these images and I hope you guys on the east coast get a good view of it.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-28-2009 10:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Chladek:
I missed the cast, but what the heck are those "Lucky Charm" marshmallow things that look like little space shuttles?
See: STS-128: Christer Fuglesang's Ahlgrens bilar

music_space
Member

Posts: 1050
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 08-28-2009 10:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Camera 060 showed the zoomed-in moon transit behind the beanie cap... Anyone else saw or captured it? I tried but failed... At that lens setting, it came and went in about 10 seconds...

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 08-28-2009 10:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would love to see that moon image as well (I saw it live on my PC). I hope somebody got a screen cap of it.

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 08-28-2009 11:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beautiful launch, beautiful ascent. The flash photography of the tank was interesting to watch, especially with that weird white light that seemed to hang behind the ET after the orbiter came off. It didn't look like it was attached to the tank.

AstroAutos
Member

Posts: 724
From: Monaghan Town, Co. Monaghan, Ireland
Registered: Mar 2009

posted 08-28-2009 11:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstroAutos   Click Here to Email AstroAutos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed, it was a fantastic launch to watch especially since it was my first night launch watched on NASA TV.

There was an absolutely AMAZING view of the ISS as it passed over Ireland here at 04:20 AM our time before the launch.

It's now 05:20 AM here and I'm still up... I must be mad in the head!!

issman1
Member

Posts: 888
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 08-28-2009 11:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was a beautiful launch to watch on TV. A mere 20 mins later I watched Discovery and its External Tank soaring overhead as two fast-moving bright stars (one bright white the other reddish) from my back garden as day was breaking here... The first time ever for me and truly amazing!

cspg
Member

Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 08-29-2009 12:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
CNN web page writes that Fuglesang is from Sweden (correct) and that Hernandez is from Mexico (huh?)...

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-29-2009 12:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
José Hernández was born in French Camp, California, to parents from the central Mexican city of La Piedad in Michoacán. From SPACE.com:
Every year he and his family would travel from Mexico to southern California in March, then northward to the Stockton area by November, working at farms along the route. They would return to Mexico for Christmas and then start the cycle all over again in the spring.

cspg
Member

Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 08-29-2009 01:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
But he's an American citizen, isn't he? If he were not, his biography would appear under the "international astronauts" section from the JSC web page.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-29-2009 01:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, he is an American citizen, though he identifies with Mexico as his family's home. Last Saturday, Mexican President Felipe Calderon called Hernandez to congratulate on his upcoming mission and invited him to dinner when he gets back to Earth. Hernandez accepted Calderon's invitation to dinner, and offered to serve as an advisor for a future Mexican space agency.

ilbasso
Member

Posts: 1494
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Registered: Feb 2006

posted 08-29-2009 08:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why was the NASA-TV feed delayed by nearly 4 minutes? If it wasn't, then every clock in my house and on my computer was off last night. I watched liftoff at 12:03 AM EDT on the NASA-TV feed from their website. Wasn't the launch actually at 11:59 PM? I don't recall there being that kind of delay on previous launches.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-29-2009 11:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
All web streaming video has lag times, in part because of the need to encode the video, but it also depends on the path between NASA's servers and your internet service provider. Typically, that lag is somewhere in between 30 seconds and a minute, but bandwidth congestion can extend the delay several minutes.

dom
Member

Posts: 439
From:
Registered: Aug 2001

posted 08-29-2009 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This was my third time seeing the shuttle and its external tank fly over my home in Ireland. I spotted them at approximately 5.20 am (!) but this time they seemed much lower and further 'south' in the sky.

Although you can usually set your watch by them - they always arc over the horizon 18 minutes after launch - this time they were about two minutes later than expected?

This, combined with misty clouds and the rapidly approaching dawn light meant I almost missed them!

It was not as spectacular as on previous occasions but a rare sight indeed...

GACspaceguy
Member

Posts: 1394
From: Guyton, GA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 08-29-2009 12:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is our shot on the causeway:

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-29-2009 01:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by music_space:
Camera 060 showed the zoomed-in moon transit behind the beanie cap... Anyone else saw or captured it?

MarylandSpace
Member

Posts: 961
From:
Registered: Aug 2002

posted 08-29-2009 08:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ben:
Yes, if it is clear you can see it in DC, NYC anywhere along the eastern seaboard up to almost Boston.
I was hoping last night to catch a glimpse of the shuttle paralleling the East Coast of the U.S. last night but was shut out by the clouds.

Did any cS members get a glimpse?

music_space
Member

Posts: 1050
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 08-29-2009 10:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beanie Cap shot: Thanks Robert! How can I get the ten-second video? It was so great to see the moon transit behind it!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-30-2009 10:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by music_space:
How can I get the ten-second video?
Here is a 15-second Quicktime clip (400k).

dom
Member

Posts: 439
From:
Registered: Aug 2001

posted 08-30-2009 01:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's an interesting video by some English 'shuttle watchers' which gives a very good idea of what we see on this side of the Atlantic.

Is it just my impression or are there other smaller objects (ice?) alongside the shuttle and the external tank?

Rob Joyner
Member

Posts: 1292
From: GA, USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 08-30-2009 04:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If I may be allowed to toot my own horn here just for a sec - this was my 20th in-person shuttle launch, (1 from Titusville, 2 from Banana Creek and 17 from the causeway)! Though it was my 20th I'll remember it more as the last late night launch of a space shuttle, that is, if the schedule stays the same.

It stayed overcast all evening at KSC and many were worried that another unexpected storm would cause another scrub, especially when very large streaks of lightning started to appear off to the east. At the causeway you could hear what seemed like everyone sighing in unison when it was announced over the loudspeakers that weather was not a concern.

STS-128 was my 5th night launch (I think!) and by far the most beautiful and loudest. The seemingly menacing clouds actually enhanced the launch quite a bit. They were not too thick and the shuttle was never obscured. Discovery lit them up nicely as she rose into the sky.

For me this launch really hit home as the beginning of the end regarding the shuttle program. It was the last late night shuttle launch and the last to transport an astronaut to the ISS for an extended stay. As the launch schedule stands each shuttle now has only two launches left.

Now a question -

As I watched replays of the launch I noticed something I've seen before. While watching the ET camera video the ET vibrates while the SRBs and orbiter do not. Is this due to actual vibration of the ET insulation or a video anomaly? Am I right in thinking that if it was the camera itself that everything in the field of view would vibrate?

NavySpaceFan
Member

Posts: 630
From: Norfolk, VA
Registered: May 2007

posted 08-30-2009 06:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Gotta say Happy 25th anniversary DISCOVERY as she enjoys her silver jubilee where she should, in space!

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1488
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 08-30-2009 08:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Every time I watch the Shuttle/ISS rendevous, I can't help but think of Wally Schirra doing it first.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1050
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 08-31-2009 08:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
...the ET vibrates while the SRBs and orbiter do not.
Rob, I've noticed the same thing about the ET camera view. This time, it is more apparent on the bottom of the screen. I wonder if this is a issue with video compression along the way to our screens?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-31-2009 12:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by NavySpaceFan:
Gotta say Happy 25th anniversary DISCOVERY as she enjoys her silver jubilee where she should, in space!
Shuttle Discovery marks silver anniversary with space station docking
For the members of Discovery's first crew, seeing "their" spacecraft still flying on its silver anniversary is a sight to relish.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-31-2009 12:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Joyner:
While watching the ET camera video the ET vibrates while the SRBs and orbiter do not.
All the vehicles vibrate to some degree but the external tank's relative motion is more apparent, especially as it nears being emptied.

Consider the relative weights. The orbiter remains a consistent 267,689 pounds (for STS-128) for the entire ascent.

Each SRB weighs approximately 1.3 million pounds at launch. Empty, they are 200,000 pounds each.

At launch, the external tank weighs in at 1.7 million pounds but over the 8 minute climb, sheds most of its mass; emptied of its fuel, it weighs a mere 60,000 pounds.

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 08-31-2009 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jay Chladek:
The flash photography of the tank was interesting to watch, especially with that weird white light that seemed to hang behind the ET after the orbiter came off. It didn't look like it was attached to the tank.
I think that white light might have actually been the moon. It's size, position, and intensity seem to remain constant. And if you watch the reply of the external tank camera, everything goes dark after the shuttle stops firing it's thrusters, yet the white light remains there... the only source of light visible on the screen.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Joyner:
While watching the ET camera video the ET vibrates while the SRBs and orbiter do not. Is this due to actual vibration of the ET insulation or a video anomaly?
With regards to the apparent vibration of the external tank, I believe the camera is mounted on the feed line... which is the part of the tank which shows the most obvious vibration during the footage. I suspect the feed line may be more subject to vibration than the main portion of tank... at least in visible footage. Also, keep in mind that small vibrations will be more apparent in objects closer to the camera than in objects farther away from the camera... so that's why we see the vibration in the ET feed line, not the SRBs and the orbiter... though the astronauts will tell you that the orbiter does indeed vibrate quite a bit!

Also, while fuel volume may affect vibrations, it's clear from the footage the maximum vibrations are seen at the point of max Q, when aerodynamic forces on the shuttle are at their peak. Beyond max Q, you see the vibrations slowly dampen out... and after SRB separation, they really dampen out (even as the "g" forces climb).

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-31-2009 03:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjanovec:
With regards to the apparent vibration of the external tank, I believe the camera is mounted on the feed line... which is the part of the tank which shows the most obvious vibration during the footage.
After checking with Bill Harwood, Mark is indeed correct and I was mistaken. The vibration you are seeing is the feed line moving, not the tank.

Part of the Return to Flight changes to the tank was to remove the foam that shielded the line from the air flow, exposing it to much more pronounced vibrations.

teopze
Member

Posts: 160
From: Warsaw, Poland
Registered: May 2008

posted 09-01-2009 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for teopze   Click Here to Email teopze     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a possibly naive question... With so few missions left and so much money and effort needed for each launch... why is half of the shuttle payload bay empty? One could almost risk a statement that two MPLM would fit at the same time... and even if not, one should be able to take up there much more? Thanks.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-02-2009 03:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The space shuttle orbiters are capable of carrying a maximum payload weight of approximately 55,000 pounds.

STS-128 is carrying 31,694 pounds of equipment and supplies in its payload bay, of which approximately 18,000 pounds were launched inside Leonardo. The orbiter also carried payload on the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support System Carrier (LMC) and aboard the middeck.

The MPLMs, which empty weigh about 9,000 pounds, were originally rated for just about 15,000 pounds of cargo but Leonardo was modified before STS-126 to be able to carry more (and it will be modified yet again after this flight so it can carry an even heavier load on STS-131).

However, capacity is not the only concern: in addition to center of gravity and abort issues (the orbiter must be able to land with a full payload bay in the case of an emergency landing before reaching the station), there is also the crew's workload and logistical considerations.

Transfer activities may seem simple, but they can be just as complex, if not more so, than spacewalks. Thus you can only fly what the crew will be able to transfer.

The space station must also be ready to accept the supplies and equipment. For example, on Flight Day 5, the STS-128 crew moved in a new science rack that needed to fit inside the Kibo lab where flight engineer Bob Thirsk had been sleeping. His more permanent crew quarters are also aboard Leonardo but that compartment doesn't get moved in until Flight Day 6. So tonight, Thirsk was left to take his sleeping bag and make camp where ever he could find the room.

Not to mention, most of what comes up requires assembly. The COLBERT treadmill is now aboard the space station -- in hundreds of pieces. As it is, its assembly won't begin until after Discovery leaves and Japan's HTV-1 arrives, as the crew doesn't have the time to deal with it until then.

teopze
Member

Posts: 160
From: Warsaw, Poland
Registered: May 2008

posted 09-04-2009 03:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for teopze   Click Here to Email teopze     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the very comprehensive answer!

328KF
Member

Posts: 829
From:
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 09-06-2009 12:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Take a look at the red handwritten note on the panel to the upper left in this in-flight crew photo from STS-128.

Any idea what this might refer to?

MiliputMan
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 09-06-2009 12:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MiliputMan   Click Here to Email MiliputMan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, it says 'Sit-up pad' on it.

ASCAN1984
Member

Posts: 1004
From: County Down, Nothern Ireland
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 09-06-2009 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ASCAN1984   Click Here to Email ASCAN1984     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow! The full picture looks more like a photo of an astronaut class than all the people currently in space. Terrific to see that many people on orbit together.

The other part of the message says "your bottom goes here" with an arrow pointing to the X.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-06-2009 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
Take a look at the red handwritten note on the panel...
That panel is in fact a piece of packing foam and notes like that are part of a tradition between the flight crew and the technicians who prepare their payload.

The astronauts find notes like these when they go to unpack the shuttle (or in this case, Leonardo). Some are more "instructive" then others.

In this case, that particular note may have been something added by a crew member as you can see them "marking" another very special piece of packing foam with a red Sharpie at the end of Flight Day 9's crew highlights (Part II).


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement