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  STS-119: mission viewing, questions, comments (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   STS-119: mission viewing, questions, comments
Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-11-2009 01:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
STS-119: mission viewing, questions, comments

This thread is intended for reader comments and questions regarding the STS-119 mission and the reports published as part of collectSPACE's Flight Day Journal.

Tickets to view the STS-119 launch from the NASA Causeway and the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex will go on sale at 9:00 a.m. EST, Monday, Jan. 12 on the KSCVC website, as well as by phone at +1 321-449-4400.

Discovery is scheduled to launch the STS-119 mission on Feb. 12 at 7:32 a.m. EST to deliver the S6 truss segment, as well the fourth and final set of power-generating solar wings for the International Space Station.

For more information about shuttle launch viewing, see: LaunchPhotography.com.

Rob Joyner
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posted 01-12-2009 08:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
WOW! It is just now 9:12 AM EST and ALL of the LTT packages are sold out, including the 'Dine with' packages! Anyone else get one? I got the 'Dine with' package for 3AM.

contra
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posted 01-12-2009 08:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for contra   Click Here to Email contra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just tried to get a LTT through internet and phone. But I had no luck. If anybody has one for me I really would appreciate it. I need the LTT for my father who will be joining me on the trip to Florida.

I will be at the Press Site for the launch but I hope to get my father on the Causeway for the launch. If you have one ticket you do not need, please let me know.

Thanks
Stefan

spaceman48263
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posted 01-12-2009 03:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman48263   Click Here to Email spaceman48263     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How can these tickets go so fast? Do the “outside” bus tour groups have some way of getting large blocks of tickets? With the limit on the number of tickets per person on some packages they sure went fast today!

contra
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posted 01-13-2009 02:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for contra   Click Here to Email contra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The tickets went fast this time that's for sure. The moment they became available I tried to order one LTT, sold out when I finished the order process. Next I tried the dinner option but no luck either.

Same time my girlfriend tried to call the ticket hotline but no luck.

Very disappointed about it and sad for my father who makes the trip from Germany only to see the launch.

Stefan

tncmaxq
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posted 01-13-2009 05:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for tncmaxq   Click Here to Email tncmaxq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I also found that lodging and car rental rates were unusually high for around Feb. 11-13. I know hotels will raise rates for special events but it seemed to me they were even higher than I have found them to be during previous launches. In some cases they had a rate increase for the night of the 13th. Usually you will see a price hike for the night of or night before launch so I thought this was odd.

Air fares still seem to have some good bargains. But I was surprised at the high rates for car rentals. I wonder if this is a heavy travel period for central FL and the space coast. Perhaps with Presidents Day coming up the following Monday, many families try to schedule vacations for around that time.

GACspaceguy
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posted 01-13-2009 07:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The issue with higher hotel rates are typical for Florida in the winter even without a launch. By Feb. everyone up north has cabin fever and heads south.

James Brown
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posted 01-13-2009 04:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for James Brown   Click Here to Email James Brown     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Don't forget the Daytona 500 is Feb. 15 I believe.

lunarrv15
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posted 01-15-2009 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lunarrv15   Click Here to Email lunarrv15     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GACspaceguy:
The issue with higher hotel rates are typical for Florida in the winter even without a launch. By Feb. everyone up north has cabin fever and heads south.
I disagree. I was monitoring hotel price three months before seeing STS-122 in December. The hotels in Titusville, Cocoa, Cocoa Beach and neighboring area were gradually increasing the rooms price every three weeks. The low budget hotels follow when the launch date is down to three weeks. After the launch date has past, all hotels lower the rooms price to the original rack price.

Example, three weeks before 122 launch, I rented a room at Super8 in Titusville. The room charge was $50 per night.

I check the hotel price the day before leaving. They inflated to $120 for a room.

The launches draws people. The hotels make the most the could as long the people are willing to purchase the set price.

Now go to Orlando, they're affordable rooms for the tourist dollars cause of the attraction of Walt Disney World.

garymilgrom
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posted 01-16-2009 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When I stayed at the Days Inn "Space Shuttle Inn" in Titusville for STS-116 they had a policy if a Shuttle launched during your stay the rate was increased (a lot) for that night. I thought that was fair - because they took the hit on scrubs.

Jay Chladek
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posted 01-17-2009 02:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When I booked my hotel room for STS-121, I had a pretty good guess as to when it would fly, even though the date hadn't been finalized. As such, my room rate stayed relatively low for that visit.

Of course, one doesn't always have that luxury as that was a unique case where all signs were pointing to the launch day a few months out since it was a Return to Flight mission. But the price probably was still higher then during an off peak period as the Firecracker 400 was also going on up the road in Daytona that weekend as well.

Mike Z
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posted 01-19-2009 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Z   Click Here to Email Mike Z     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did NASA TV cover the STS-119 crew arrival to KSC today? I had my timer set for 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 since you never know exactly when they'll land and didn't see it.

Mike Z
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posted 01-19-2009 12:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Z   Click Here to Email Mike Z     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They just replayed the vrew arrival on NASA Video File. They arrived at 10:48 a.m.

Mike

contra
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posted 01-26-2009 12:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for contra   Click Here to Email contra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I will be in Florida for the launch of STS-119 and would like to see the arrival of the SRB retrieval ships. Any idea on what day and part of the day I could expect the ships sailing through Port Canaveral.

thanks,
Stefan

Don119
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posted 02-16-2009 09:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Don119   Click Here to Email Don119     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone have an educated guess as to what time of day they will launch?

If its a night launch, I will drive the 14 hours to see it. There are so few left, night or day.

I thought NASA gave the ballpark of info earlier than this; I realize no decisions until 2.20 on 2.28 or later launch. I cannot find anything, anywhere

Is it correct that there are only a few consecutive orbits in each 24 hour cycle for an efficient launch to ISS?

Thank you for the help - this is an awesome forum and site!

KSCartist
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posted 02-16-2009 09:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If the launch goes on Feb 27th - the time is 1:32 AM.

Tim

Ben
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posted 02-16-2009 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Don119:
Is it correct that there are only a few consecutive orbits in each 24 hour cycle for an efficient launch to ISS?
The shuttle can launch to the ISS only once per 24 hour period, the point at which KSC, as the Earth turns, passes under the orbit of the ISS (think of the orbit as a hoop that is fixed in space with the Earth rotating inside it). It will actually pass under the orbit twice a day, once with the direction of travel to the north and once to the south, but NASA only launches to the northeast and not the southeast so as not to overfly any land.

The shuttle has enough performance margin to launch roughly five minutes on either side of being directly under the orbital plane. Sometimes it's a few minutes more and sometimes less. The launch time for ISS flights gets 23-25 minutes earlier each day. You can see a list of upcoming times here.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-19-2009 11:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA, Channel One News Linkup With Next Shuttle Mission; Students Can Submit Questions For Astronauts

In a unique event, NASA and Channel One News will offer students the opportunity to ask questions of the next space shuttle crew. The crew includes two former science teachers, Joseph Acaba and Richard Arnold, who are now fully-trained NASA astronauts. They will make their first journey into orbit on shuttle Discovery's upcoming mission to the International Space Station, currently targeted to launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida no earlier than Feb. 27.

On the mission's fourth day, Channel One News Anchor Steven Fabian will interview Acaba, Arnold, shuttle Commander Lee Archambault and International Space Station Commander Mike Fincke. The questions will be selected from written and videotaped submissions made on the Web.

NASA Television and the agency's Web site will broadcast the interview live.

"This is a great opportunity to recognize the important contribution of teachers inspiring the next generation of explorers," said Joyce Winterton, NASA's assistant administrator for Education at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

"We are thrilled for this special opportunity to connect Channel One students directly to the space shuttle crew," commented Angela Hunter, senior vice president and executive producer for Channel One News. "Providing teens with this type of access to an important journey allows students to share in a unique experience and offers them tools to further explore a fascinating area of science."

The STS-119 mission will deliver the station's final set of giant solar arrays, which will provide the electricity to fully power science experiments and support the station's expanded crew of six in May. The flight also will replace a failed unit for a system that converts urine to potable water.

During the 14-day flight, Acaba will conduct two spacewalks and Arnold will conduct three.

As a complement to the spacewalks, NASA has developed an educational Web site focused on spacesuits and spacewalks. The site includes activity guides for kindergarten through 12th grade teachers; a clickable spacesuit to learn about the parts and functions of the astronauts' personal spacecraft; and a career corner that features profiles on spacesuit designers and technicians.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-02-2009 01:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Public Invited To Submit Questions For NASA's Space Shuttle Launch

Space enthusiasts from across the United States and around the world are invited to submit questions about space shuttle Discovery's upcoming launch, its STS-119 mission to the International Space Station, and NASA space exploration. Questions may be answered on NASA Television during the countdown to launch.

The STS-119 mission will deliver a new crew member to the space station. The crew also will deliver and install a fourth and final set of large solar arrays that will provide electricity to support six-person station crews beginning in May. Currently, three crew members live aboard the station for several months at a time.

Discovery and its seven astronauts are tentatively targeted to launch March 12 at 8:54 p.m. EDT from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA commentary will begin about five hours before liftoff.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-05-2009 03:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Spaceflight Now release
Spaceflight Now to host live launch broadcast

Spaceflight Now is excited to be joining forces with veteran space broadcasters Miles O'Brien and David Waters to provide unrivaled video coverage of space shuttle Discovery's next mission, scheduled for launch on Wednesday, March 11.

On launch day Spaceflight Now's acclaimed Mission Status Center will feature a five-hour live video broadcast hosted by Miles and David from the Kennedy Space Center. They will be joined on air by astronaut Leroy Chiao, who flew in space four times and commanded the 10th expedition to the International Space Station.

A daily video podcast, available through Apple's iTune's service and YouTube will cover the mission from countdown to touchdown, starting with the arrival of the seven astronauts at the Kennedy Space Center on Sunday.

Both the live broadcast and podcast will be available free to all readers. Stay tuned to Spaceflight Now for more details.

Rob Joyner
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posted 03-06-2009 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you are going to the launch KSC has issued new arrival times for those with car placards:

12:00 AM has changed to 01:00 PM
01:00 AM has changed to 02:00 PM
02:00 AM has changed to 03:00 PM
03:00 AM has changed to 04:00 PM
04:00 AM has changed to 05:00 PM
05:00 AM has changed to 06:00 PM
06:00 AM has changed to 07:00 PM

The new times for the
'Dine w/a Astronaut' buffets are:

12:30 AM DWA is now scheduled for 02:30 PM
Seating begins at 02:15 PM

02:45 AM DWA is now scheduled for 04:45 PM
Seating begins at 04:30 PM

05:15 AM DWA is now scheduled for 07:00 PM
Seating begins at 06:45 PM

MarylandSpace
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posted 03-10-2009 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is the launch now early early Thursday morning? Will the shuttle be visible along the east coast? How long will the engines burn?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-10-2009 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The launch remains set for 9:20 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, under the light of a full moon.

As Discovery is destined for the space station, the shuttle will follow a flight path that will take it up the eastern seaboard. The main engines burn for approximately 8 minutes before cutoff.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-11-2009 09:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MarylandSpace:
[B]Will the shuttle be visible along the east coast?
National Geographic: Shuttle Launch to Be Visible to Most of U.S. East Coast
Weather permitting, people within about a 500-mile (800-kilometer) radius of the central Florida coast will be able to see the flare from the shuttle's solid-fuel rocket launchers two seconds after launch for about two minutes.

From two to eight minutes after launch, Discovery's main engines will make the shuttle seem to burn like a flickering, yellow-orange star.

People with binoculars may even be able to make out the shuttle's V-shaped tail.

This stage of the event should be visible to sky-watchers as far north as the southern tip of Nova Scotia and as far west as the Appalachian Mountains.

But observers will need an unobstructed view, as the shuttle will appear very low to the horizon -- no higher than the width of a fist on an outstretched arm.

E2M Lem Man
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posted 03-12-2009 06:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If the replacement is successful, then the countdown will resume Sunday morning for a 7:43 p.m. EDT launch of Discovery on the now 13-day STS-119 mission.
Why is the mission being down scaled to eleven days - because of the Soyuz shot?

Don't they need the spacewalks? And as the Orbiter will already be docked to the station, and not really in the way of the oncoming crew I don't see why NASA doesn't keep to the 14 day plan?

Maybe just keep the party shuttle crew restricted to their ship.

J.M. Busby

KSCartist
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posted 03-12-2009 06:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm the first to admit I'm no rocket scientist but why isn't it possible to have a Shuttle and Soyuz docked at the same time? Is it an atmospheric pressure differential, or a electrical power drain?

I can only liken it to twin Gemini missions in 1965.

Tim

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-12-2009 07:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dockings, whether by space shuttle or Soyuz, require preparations by the space station crew, both before and after the arrival. To avoid overloading the crew, the international partners have agreed to leave a buffer between visiting spacecraft.

There is also a safety concern, as were something to go wrong during a docking, which is a real possibility, the desire is to limit the crew potentially affected.

And then there is the inadvertent damage that one vehicle could cause the other during a nominal docking by way of reaction control thruster plume contamination.

So there are several reasons why NASA and Roscosmos preserve a period of time between their vehicles arriving at the space station.

As it is just as important to the space station that Soyuz TMA-14 launches on time so as to maintain crew rotation schedules as it is that STS-119 delivers the S6 truss and Koichi Wakata, the ISS program managers decided it was more important to try to launch Discovery on a shortened mission now than it was to preserve the original slate of four spacewalks by waiting until after the Soyuz docks.

With the exception of the first EVA, which is devoted to the installation of the truss, the other three spacewalks are all get-ahead tasks, which can also be performed by station crew members when the shuttle is not there.

So, the impact of losing one day and one spacewalk -- or even three days and three spacewalks should they launch on Tuesday -- was considered less a problem to the larger ISS schedule than the alternative.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-13-2009 12:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Florida Today's Flame Trench will be hosting a webcast of the launch on Sunday, and as I did for them during STS-124's countdown, I will again be live on camera discussing the mementos packed and menu choices made by the STS-119 crew.

I am scheduled for 5:00 p.m. EDT, between the time the astronauts board and the hatch is closed on Discovery

Mr Meek
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posted 03-13-2009 01:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Obviously, I don't have a full understanding of the valve lines in the venting system. But from listening to the briefing earlier today, it sounds like the leak was in a seal on the "back" (ground) side of the valve. In looking at the exploded diagram, it appears that everything on the right side of the valve in the diagram would be exposed to near-cryo temperatures and pressure from GH2. The seals on the left side would only be exposed to those temperatures and pressures when the valve was opened to vent.

I always find this side of spaceflight fascinating. The beauty and grandeur of space itself is captivating, but getting there is just as interesting to me.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-13-2009 03:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Meek:
But from listening to the briefing earlier today, it sounds like the leak was in a seal on the "back" (ground) side of the valve.
They haven't been able to determine the location of the leak yet, though they are 99.9% sure it was part of the vent line and not a problem with the tank itself.

The belief is that by replacing the quick disconnect and all of its associated internal seals, that whatever the culprit was, it will not longer be an issue.

Mr Meek
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posted 03-13-2009 04:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If memory serves, wasn't there a mention of a nick in one of the seals?

(My previous post was mostly shade-tree mechanic speculation. I listened to a replay of the briefing over lunch, so my recolletion may be wrong.)

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-13-2009 05:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Indeed, there was mention of a nicked seal, but it's not clear if that was the culprit according to launch director Mike Leinbach.
We don't have any smoking guns yet. We did see one seal that may have a slight nick on it. Not sure if that's the real cause of the issue yet. That's a first report, you've got to give us another six or eight hours before we can really declare whether that's the culprit or not.

Mr Meek
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posted 03-13-2009 06:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah. That must have been mid-french fry. Thanks.

Rob Joyner
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posted 03-14-2009 09:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone know at about what time the ET will be filled with enough hydrogen to tell if the leakage problem has been corrected?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-14-2009 09:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"The proof of the pudding will be when we get into external tank loading, and really once the tank gets pretty full when we get into that topping scenario just like we did on Wednesday," said [Launch Director Mike] Leinbach during a media briefing.
Tanking is scheduled to start at 10:18 a.m. EDT and hydrogen topping is expected around 1:13 p.m.

NASA TV will offer tanking commentary beginning at 10:15 a.m. (and of course, you can read the latest as part of our Flight Day Journal, too.)

Jay Chladek
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posted 03-15-2009 02:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I sit here awake looking at an image of Discovery sitting on the pad at night. It looks very pretty and tranquil. I turned on the feed to see if any mention would be made of the countdown beginning at 3:18 AM ET. Guess not though (at least not on the TV feed).

However, I feel something else as part of me is transported back to the first RSS rollback for STS-121 back in 2006. It was my second attempt to view a shuttle launch and my first one at the press site.

After the bus I was on got back from the rollback photo op (without the spotlights as NASA didn't kick those on until the freelancer photographers got on the bus), I went outside the press center to near the countdown clock and just had a look. It was dark, but the stark beauty of Discovery under the floods nearly four miles away on Pad 39B and the darkness around except for the digital numbers of the countdown clock made me pause and take in the sights. It was also dead quiet. I didn't hear a creature stirring outside at all and there was no wind blowing. It felt almost like it was just me there and the shuttle on the horizon having our own private moment together. I spent a few minutes taking in the moment. I silently prayed for a successful launch the next day (as it turned out, it wouldn't fly until Tuesday, July 4th after a couple of launch scrubs) and pondered what the future would bring. I also tried to take a couple night shots with my digital camera before walking back inside to head back to the hotel (without much success).

As I sit here looking at Discovery on the pad, I am reminded of that night. I close my eyes and I almost feel like I am back there at the press site as I was in 2006. I hadn't remembered it until now though. And so, the machine is at peace at a time before a lot of activity begins to give it a not very peaceful sendoff. Once again I am going to say a silent prayer, hoping things go well and again I will ponder what the future will bring.

neke
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posted 03-15-2009 06:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for neke   Click Here to Email neke     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beautiful launch; I just watched it with my kids on CNN.

My 6 year old is very concerned about the fate of the bat.

xlsteve
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posted 03-15-2009 07:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for xlsteve   Click Here to Email xlsteve     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I watched the launch on NASA TV, and as I live on the east coast, I went out on my back deck at six minutes after launch in the hopes of catching a glimpse. My wife and I stared to the Southeast and she said "There it is!" and we saw a very bright, orange-yellow star move across the horizon and then wink out. I went back in to hear MCC confirm MECO.

It was pretty cool. I am lucky my wife spotted it as I would have missed it if I had waited just two more seconds.

Jay Chladek
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posted 03-15-2009 07:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm sure the bat is off somewhere fighting crime (or just eating bugs). So tell him to tune in tomorrow, same bat time, same bat channel!

The ET tank feed provided some nice imagery for this one. It was interesting seeing the shuttle make its own sunrise and sunset in the course of about 10 minutes or so.

Now I'll be heading outside in about 30 minutes as the shuttle is supposed to be visible in the southern sky from my vantage point briefly and then the ISS is supposed to pass overhead about 30 minutes after that and the sky is clear tonight.

Jay Chladek
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posted 03-15-2009 09:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, as advertised the shuttle was visible for about a minute in the southern sky at 8:19 PM followed by the ISS being visible at 8:53 for 3 minutes. It has been awhile since I've seen the ISS and I forgot just how bright it could get. When the fourth set of solar arrays gets added, it should be even brighter.

BTW, I figure it will probably be after docking, but the ISS and shuttle are to be visible for 5 minutes where I am on Tuesday evening just after sunset (8:17PM CT I believe).


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Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





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