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  STS-126 mission viewing and commentary (Page 2)

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Author Topic:   STS-126 mission viewing and commentary
NavySpaceFan
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posted 11-21-2008 07:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
Astronauts never swear or do they refrain themselves knowing that they're "on air"?
Being a career sailor myself, I can imagine CAPT Piper had to realy censor herself to prevent a slew of colorful metaphors when she lost her crewlock bag. Not that she could have gotten around it, COL Melroy called a broken digital camera a "Popa Oscar Sierra" during STS-120's EVA 4.

KSCartist
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posted 11-21-2008 08:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yeah somehow "D'Oh! " just doesn't convey the correct emotion.

Tim

spaceman1953
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posted 11-22-2008 12:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman1953   Click Here to Email spaceman1953     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thought this might be a place for FLYOVER reports... after getting 9 inches of Lake Effect snow on the ground in a few hours last night, the ISS/Shuttle combo flew right over the farm on a good clear (and cold, predicted 7 degrees tonight for the low) right on schedule and bright, bright, bright.

Only a two minute visit, it came up slow, passed overhead at a good clip and disappeared alot sooner than we have ever seen, just after it passed overhead.

But we waved, as always, just in case the cameras were on!

God bless them all!

Gene and Judy Bella

FFrench
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posted 11-22-2008 10:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BMckay:
I am wondering if anyone caught Endeavour creating a ripple through a cloud as it launched on film?
Check out this video... it was an amazing effect...

gliderpilotuk
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posted 11-23-2008 05:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wonderful.

If anyone else was on the causeway, how long could you see the vehicle for? I was takng sequential shots with my camera and looking out with the other eye. When it finally "disappeared" I wasn't sure whether it was due to engine cut-off or merely distance/cloud. Seemed visible for an awfully long time, like a fading star, especially with a 300mm zoom.

Paul

Rob Joyner
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posted 11-23-2008 10:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I could still see her as I heard the call to MECO over the loudspeakers.

Tom
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posted 11-23-2008 11:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Paul...I don't believe it's possible to "view" MECO from the launch site. It would be too far down range and below the horizon to see it.

If I remember correctly, viewers at the KSC area have seen the launch on clear nights until ~ T+ 7 minutes.

FFrench
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posted 11-23-2008 11:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It did seem visible for a very, very long time this time - over six and a half minutes, at which point it was still a pretty bright dot on the horizon. It then seemed to fade very quickly, in less than a second to a dull red, then nothing. I wasn't keeping exact time, however, so this is only an approximation.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-23-2008 12:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Joyner:
I could still see her as I heard the call to MECO over the loudspeakers.
I was atop the CBS news building at the press site for the launch and after waiting there for SRB separation and then collecting my camera gear, I made my way back to the main newsroom, keeping an eye on the still visible shuttle. Just before I reached the door to the media center, I thought I heard "Press to MECO" over the PA system, which surprised me as Endeavour was still in sight and I thought the call was early. A few seconds later, I realized I had heard "Press to ATO" (abort to orbit), indicating that the crew could now enter orbit even if they had an early main engine shutdown.

Maybe you misheard the same call as I did?

buckeyecal
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posted 11-24-2008 07:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for buckeyecal   Click Here to Email buckeyecal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Evening fellow space geeks... Daniel here. Just stepped outside a local library here in Boise, ID and saw a VERY bright star sail over from SW to NE for a good 3 minutes or so! It's dusk, so I got great sunlight off the space combo... never get tired of it

BMckay
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posted 11-25-2008 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMckay   Click Here to Email BMckay     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to NasaWatch.com, the STS-126 tool bag that was not tethered came back to earth and was found in the US. It was then placed on eBay and 6 people actually bid on it.

Nice to see an item like that make it through reentry without a mark on it.

Bryan

music_space
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posted 11-25-2008 09:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In the overhead sky near you: "The Bag".

From SpaceWeather.com:

This week the toolbag is making a series of passes over Europe; late next week it will return to the evening skies of North America. Using binoculars, look for it flying a few minutes ahead of the ISS. Spaceweather's satellite tracker is monitoring both the space station and the tool bag; click here for predictions.

------------------
Fran├žois Guay
Collector of litterature, notebooks, equipment and memories!

cspg
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posted 11-25-2008 09:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This spacewalk marked the fourth and final EVA of the STS-126 mission, which saw three astronauts (Kimbrough, Bowen and Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper) log 26 hours and 41 minutes outside. It was the 118th spacewalk in support of space station assembly (for a total of 745 hours and 29 minutes), and the 90th to originate from the ISS itself.
This EVA marked the 200th EVA of the US Space program.

Chris.

Mr Meek
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posted 11-25-2008 09:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Watch posted a screen grab of the "tool bag" listed on ebay. Stupid, but still chuckle-worthy. Every hobby needs a class clown, I guess.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-25-2008 03:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
This EVA marked the 200th EVA of the US Space program.
According to NASA public affairs officer Rob Navias, this mission's third spacewalk -- rather than the fourth -- was the 200th U.S. spacewalk.

Rob Joyner
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posted 11-25-2008 04:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Maybe you misheard the same call as I did?

After reviewing my video and listening a few times I could just make out that it was indeed, "Press to A-T-O," that was said. This occurred at T+5:20.

It sure did sound like MECO, didn't it?! Good call Robert!

cspg
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posted 11-26-2008 12:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
According to NASA public affairs officer Rob Navias, this mission's third spacewalk -- rather than the fourth -- was the 200th U.S. spacewalk.
Do they keep a web page about this?

There was an error in my records but now STS-126's 4th EVA is the US' 199th and not 201st (ok, my records also show a discrepancy when it comes to ISS EVAs).

I simply used Portree and Trevino's Mount to Olympus (NASA's Monograph on Aerospace History #7) and updated it up to now.

Chris.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-26-2008 08:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There isn't a page on their website to my knowledge, however the EVA office does distribute (internally) a statistics sheet updated after each mission lands. I can see if I can get the most recent copy after STS-126 lands.

spaceman48263
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posted 11-26-2008 04:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman48263   Click Here to Email spaceman48263     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anything been reported on how the flame trench repairs held up during the lift off?

NavySpaceFan
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posted 11-26-2008 04:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NavySpaceFan   Click Here to Email NavySpaceFan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaceman48263:
Has anything been reported on how the flame trench repairs held up during the lift off?

Great article on this at NASASpaceflight.com.

OV-105
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posted 11-30-2008 12:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well off to Boron to see Endeavour land at Eddi. Maybe get to see the crew at Domingo's tonight.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-30-2008 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
the 300th spacewalk
According to NASA's records, the 300th spacewalk occurred some time ago. By their count, there have been 201 U.S. spacewalks, 125 Russian spacewalks and 1 Chinese spacewalk.

(Again, I should soon have a document that summarizes these records.)

spaceman1953
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posted 11-30-2008 03:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman1953   Click Here to Email spaceman1953     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks to NASA TV online, we saw a beautiful California landing!

Congratulations to all! And thanks!

Gene and Judy Bella

MarylandSpace
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posted 11-30-2008 04:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MarylandSpace   Click Here to Email MarylandSpace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What a beautiful landing. I enjoyed Miles O'Brien's commentary. How fortunate we are to enjoy space science and these events.

Garry

FFrench
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posted 11-30-2008 08:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
OV-105, I hope you had as much fun seeing it as we did!

We decided that, with the luxury of a long weekend, and having a good amount of advance timing, to turn the day into a fun drive through the high desert. Watched the landing from an overpass just west of Boron - three of the overpasses had dozens of stopped cars on them, and quite a party atmosphere - great to experience, particularly when we all heard the very loud double sonic boom and began scanning the skies.

We saw the landing from the opposite side than shown on the YouTube link Robert posted - so the shuttle had the sun behind it and looked like a darker object set against the sky - quite a different view to the usual gleaming white TV shots, and all the more dramatic as the dark, hulking mass grew larger and raced towards us.

I'd imagined it to be more like an airplane landing. I have to say, it was not anything like an aircraft landing, it had a very particular... shuttle-y feel.

It was a quick, quick event, but made very worthwhile by the day spent in the beauty and clarity of the high desert at this time of year. The Joshua trees, vivid desert colors, cloudless blue sky and snowcapped mountains made for a beautiful day, and the shuttle was the icing on the cake.

It's the first time I have seen a mission launch and land, and a lucky coincidence that I happened to be close to both events when they happened. It really brought home just how long these missions are, as the launch seems an age away now.

Thanks, Robert, for the cell phone updates as we drove up there!

Considering the multi-year gaps between landings at Edwards recently, and the use of it only when Florida is out... I wonder when the last ever shuttle landing at Edwards may be... and perhaps, in fact, that this was it?

cspg
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posted 11-30-2008 11:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
According to NASA's records, the 300th spacewalk occurred some time ago.
I agree with the Russian and Chinese numbers... I guess NASA keeps records based up space-faring nations (USSR/Russia, USA, and China). But if you were to break down the EVAs by nationality of the spacewalkers, you'll have quite a different figure. That being said, in my records I have counted only one EVA even if it is performed by a Russian and an American (so I'm still counting 302 EVAs). For example:

Expedition 16 on 11/20/07, Whitson and Malenchenko performed an EVA. It was the US's 180th and Russia's 123rd.

STS-122, on 02/13/08, Walheim and Schlegel made the 2nd EVA of the mission. That EVA was the US's 186th and Germany's 2nd.

Chris.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-01-2008 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
But if you were to break down the EVAs by nationality of the spacewalkers, you'll have quite a different figure.
In other words, you're counting spacewalkers rather than spacewalks. An EVA is traditionally counted as a single unit, regardless how many spacewalkers were involved. The nationality is assigned by what nation's spacesuit is being worn.

Thus, any spacewalk in an Orlan spacesuit is a Russian EVA and any spacewalk in an EMU is an American EVA.

cspg
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posted 12-01-2008 09:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm trying to count everything...

I should have been more specific in my earlier post.

This one was the Space Age's EVA number 280:

Expedition 16 on 11/09/07, Whitson and Malenchenko performed an EVA. It was the US's 180th and Russia's 123rd.

And this one was number 286:

STS-122, on 02/13/08, Walheim and Schlegel made the 2nd EVA of the mission. That EVA was the US's 186th and Germany's 2nd.

My latest entry is the Bowen/Kimbrough EVA on 11/24. Space Age number 302, US's 199th, the 19th EVA for 2008, Space Station 223 (all stations included), ISS EVA 115 and Shuttle EVA 129.

It's a crazy thing to compile because as you rightly point out any Orlan-based EVA could be labeled as Russian/Soviet, and EMU EVA American. If you want to make your life even more miserable, an EVA conducted from the Quest airlock is a US one (and from Pirs it's a Russian one) or a shuttle-to-ISS docked EVA is a Shuttle or ISS EVA? and so forth...

Wondering why I'm trying to keep track of these things anyway. I gave up regarding ISS expeditions...

Chris.

OV-105
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posted 12-01-2008 01:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
OV-105, I hope you had as much fun seeing it as we did!
If you saw a red F-150 Super Crew it was mine. That is only the second time I can remember them landing on 04. The only other time I can think of an 04 landing at Edwards was STS-44. I miss not be able to be out on the East Shore Viewing Site on the lakebed. I still have some of the lakebed I "saved" from a landing back in the late 80's.

GoesTo11
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posted 12-01-2008 02:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GoesTo11   Click Here to Email GoesTo11     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah, that brought back memories... I was fortunate enough as a kid to watch STS-5, 6, 7, 9, and 41-D return from space at Edwards. Francis is right about Shuttle approach and landing having an "un-airplane-like" look and feel. I don't really know how to describe it, and I think there's more to it than the novelty of a returning spaceship.

I never get tired of watching these (and I never really relax until I hear "Wheel stop.") Congratulations to the crew of Endeavour and all the personnel who supported yet another wonderfully planned and executed mission.

Kevin

gliderpilotuk
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posted 12-02-2008 03:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
I'd imagined it to be more like an airplane landing. I have to say, it was not anything like an aircraft landing, it had a very particular... shuttle-y feel.

Well if I was in an "airplane" on a 19 degree final glide slope I'd certainly be concerned! The only airplane that came close to this was Concorde, which interestingly had a similar final glide slope and nose-high approach (the delta allowing for aerodynamic braking).

Paul

Mike Z
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posted 12-02-2008 05:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Z   Click Here to Email Mike Z     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone noticed Don Pettit's feet in this photo. He has socks on and his feet look swollen.

MIke Z

Mr Meek
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posted 12-02-2008 05:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would say that's an abnormal redistribution of fluid due to 2 weeks in microgravity coming to an abrupt end. It's not an inertia thing, but a "crazy mixed up plumbing" thing. He certainly doesn't look too pleased about it in that photo.

Jay Chladek
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posted 12-02-2008 08:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Knowing Don's fun loving attitude, I am surprised he wasn't wearing bunny slippers in that picture.

Ben Watson
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posted 12-03-2008 09:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben Watson   Click Here to Email Ben Watson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has a schedule been set for when the SCA will depart Edwards with Endeavor for Kennedy?

Ben
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posted 12-03-2008 09:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It is slated to depart EAFB on Sunday for an arrival at KSC Tuesday morning, weather permitting. The route and timing tends to be played out in realtime as they avoid weather systems. They may opt to spend more than the planned time wherever they stop, or less if there is weather to beat.

Lee Brandon Cremer
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posted 12-11-2008 02:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lee Brandon Cremer   Click Here to Email Lee Brandon Cremer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did the SCA blow a tire on its port outboard set at 2:52 sec into this video?

mjanovec
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posted 12-11-2008 03:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No, that was the smoke generated when the nose gear touched down.

hlbjr
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posted 12-11-2008 10:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hlbjr   Click Here to Email hlbjr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looking at the great pictures of Endeavour being ferried back to KSC on the 747 SCA, I wonder who the lucky guys are who get to fly the SCA? Is it always the same crew or is there a rotation? I recall Gordon Fullerton used to do some of this flying. Thanks for any information you can give me.

Harvey Brown
Delray Beach, FL

Delta7
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posted 12-11-2008 01:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hlbjr:
Looking at the great pictures of Endeavour being ferried back to KSC on the 747 SCA, I wonder who the lucky guys are who get to fly the SCA?
NASA Dryden lists 2 among it's current pilot staff as being rated in the 747:

Frank Batteas (the Chief of Dryden's Flight Crew Branch) and William Brockett.


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