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Author Topic:   NASA updates shuttle launch dates
Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-14-2008 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Updates Shuttle Target Launch Dates

NASA officials on Thursday revised the target launch dates for space shuttle flights during the second half of 2008. The space shuttle and International Space Station programs agreed to the changes during a meeting at NASA's Johnson Space Center to evaluate options following the STS-122 mission delay.

The next two shuttle flights, STS-123 on Endeavour targeted for March 11 and STS-124 on Discovery targeted for April 24, are being assessed and coordinated with NASA's international partners. Any decision on those launch dates will take place after the current STS-122 mission lands.

Late 2008 shuttle mission target launch dates are: Aug. 28 - Atlantis (STS-125) to service the Hubble Space Telescope Oct. 16 - Endeavour (STS-126) to deliver equipment to the International Space Station Dec. 4 - Discovery (STS-119) to deliver the final set of solar arrays to the station

Flights beyond 2008 have not been assessed. Both shuttle and station program officials are considering options for scheduling the remainder of the shuttle flights.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-20-2008 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Updates Target Launch Date for Shuttle Discovery

NASA is targeting May 25 at 7:26 p.m. EDT for the launch of the space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission from the Kennedy Space Center, Fla.

The flight originally was targeted for April 24. Fuel sensor system repair work on STS-122 and STS-123 delayed final preparations of Discovery's external fuel tank. The tank is expected to arrive at Kennedy in early March. Also, the shuttle cannot launch to the International Space Station between May 7 and 25 because the angle of the sun with respect to the plane of the station's orbit is too high to generate sufficient solar power for the mission.

Discovery's launch date move will not affect the remainder of the shuttle manifest.

Shuttle and station program officials will continue to evaluate Discovery's liftoff date and are protecting the option to launch the shuttle a few days earlier.

During the mission to the space station, the shuttle and its seven-member crew will deliver the pressurized module and the robotic arm of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory.

BMckay
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posted 02-22-2008 05:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMckay   Click Here to Email BMckay     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Oct. 16 - Endeavour (STS-126) to deliver equipment to the International Space Station
Can anyone predict or tell me when they think the shuttle and STS-126 mission is scheduled to launch on 10/16? Day or night time launch?

Ben
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posted 02-22-2008 05:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BMckay:
Day or night time launch?
About 8am local time (say 7 to 9am); early morning. Sunrise is 7:24 that day so it could be close to it.

cspg
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posted 04-06-2008 12:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to NASA Spaceflight:
Atlantis' STS-125 mission to Hubble delayed to October

The Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) has completed a re-evaluation of the delivery dates for ET-127 and ET-129. The two tanks directly relate to the launch date target for STS-125 - the final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope - and the LON-400 rescue mission contingency.

As a result of the evaluations, STS-125 has been delayed to October, STS-126 to November and STS-119 to February, 2009.

mjanovec
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posted 04-06-2008 11:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it too early to know the target launch dates in October and November?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-06-2008 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The program has yet decide the new "no earlier than" dates. More details are expected this week.

Mr Meek
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posted 04-06-2008 12:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fantastic. Well, for me anyway. Ms Meek and I were planning a trip to KSC to see the STS-126 launch in October, but seeing STS-125 (with both Atlantis and Endeavour on the pads) would be an incredible bonus.

Hilary
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posted 04-07-2008 09:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hilary   Click Here to Email Hilary     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Meek:
...but seeing STS-125 (with both Atlantis and Endeavour on the pads) would be an incredible bonus.
Only STS-125 will be on the pad since there is only one operational pad for the shuttle at this point. The other pad is going to be undergoing modifications for the Ares 1-X launch. STS-126 will roll out after STS-125 launches.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-07-2008 09:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hilary:
Only STS-125 will be on the pad since there is only one operational pad for the shuttle at this point.
Actually, Mr. Meek is correct: to support the launch-on-need contingency for the STS-125 mission to Hubble, NASA will roll out Endeavour to Pad 39B before Atlantis launches from Pad 39A. That way, should Atlantis be damaged and unable to safely bring the crew back from space, Endeavour will be ready to launch (from 39B).

Once Atlantis is deemed safe for reentry, Endeavour's use as an emergency rescue ship will be released and it will be rolled from Pad 39B to Pad 39A for STS-126.

While 39B is being converted for use by the Constellation program, its modifications were purposely deferred to allow for the STS-125 mission and its launch-on-need requirement.

Mr Meek
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posted 04-07-2008 10:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep. When the launch date of STS-125 was August, we were considering moving up our trip. Obviously, that will be the last time two shuttles are on the pads. But the shift works out to suit our original plans.

Hilary
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posted 04-07-2008 10:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hilary   Click Here to Email Hilary     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
While 39B is being converted for use by the Constellation program, its modifications were purposely deferred to allow for the STS-125 mission and its launch-on-need requirement.
My mistake... the Ares 1-X mods to 39B will be delayed as well due to the STS-125 delay according to a meeting that I had this morning. This will probably mean a delay for Ares 1-X, but nothing is official yet.

tncmaxq
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posted 04-09-2008 09:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for tncmaxq   Click Here to Email tncmaxq     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any idea what time of day 125 will launch if that Oct 9 date holds? An Aug 28 launch would have been at 9:38 pm ET. I am hoping whenever that mission flies that liftoff will be at night. I need to see at least one more night launch before the shuttle retires, and the opportunities of course are limited.

Ben
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posted 04-09-2008 12:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oct. 8 would be somewhere in the vicinity of sunrise give or take an hour. If 126 is early November (NASA Spaceflight hinting at Nov. 10 right now) then it would be a night launch, approaching back towards sunset as mid-Nov rolls around.

Edited May 17: Apparently Oct. 8 for Hubble would be about 1:30am with an expected 60 or so minute launch window.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-22-2008 12:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Updates Space Shuttle Target Launch Dates

NASA Thursday adjusted the target launch dates for two space shuttle missions in 2008. Shuttle Atlantis' STS-125 mission to the Hubble Space Telescope is now targeted for Oct. 8, and Endeavour's STS-126 supply mission to the International Space Station has moved from Oct. 16 to Nov. 10.

The final servicing mission to Hubble was moved from Aug. 28 due to a delay in deliveries of components, including the external fuel tanks, and the need to prepare Endeavour for a possible rescue mission approximately two weeks after STS-125 launches.

Flights beyond STS-126 will be assessed and coordinated with NASA's international partners at a later date. Both shuttle and station program officials will continue to consider options for the remainder of the shuttle flights, with those target launch dates being subject to change.

The Shuttle Program also has decided that Atlantis will be assigned two additional flights after the Hubble mission in order to more efficiently fly the remaining shuttle flights using the three orbiters in sequence.

Click here for the shuttle launch manifest.

Ben
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posted 05-22-2008 08:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And Nov. 10 for STS-126 is 9:28pm per current orbital data. So we are looking at two night launches in a row to end 2008.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-07-2008 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Sets Launch Dates for Remaining Space Shuttle Missions

Following a detailed, integrated assessment, NASA selected target launch dates for the remaining eight space shuttle missions on the current manifest in 2009 and 2010. The manifest includes one flight to the Hubble Space Telescope, seven assembly flights to the International Space Station, and two station contingency flights, planned to be completed before the end of fiscal year 2010. The agency previously selected Oct. 8 and Nov. 10 as launch dates for Atlantis' STS-125 mission to service Hubble and Endeavour's STS-126 / ULF-2 mission to supply the space station and service both Solar Alpha Rotary Joints on the port and starboard end of its truss backbone that supports equipment and solar arrays.

The approved target dates are subject to change based on processing and other launch vehicle schedules. They reflect the agency's commitment to complete assembly of the station and to retire the shuttle fleet as transition continues to the new launch vehicles, including Ares and Orion.

Shuttle Flights in 2009

  • Feb. 12 -- Discovery (STS-119 / 15A) will kick off a five-flight 2009 with its 36th mission to deliver the final pair of U.S. solar arrays to be installed on the starboard end of the station's truss. The truss serves as the backbone support for external equipment and spare components, including the Mobile Base System. Lee Archambault will command the 14-day flight that will include four planned spacewalks. Joining him will be pilot Tony Antonelli and mission specialists John Phillips, Steve Swanson, Joseph Acaba, Richard Arnold and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata. Wakata will replace Sandy Magnus on the station as a flight engineer. STS-119 marks the 28th shuttle flight to the station.

  • May 15 -- Endeavour (STS-127 / 2JA) sets sail on its 23rd mission with the Japanese Kibo Laboratory's Exposed Facility and Experiment Logistics Module Exposed Section, the final permanent components of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's contribution to the station program. During the 15-day mission, Endeavour's crew will perform five spacewalks and deliver six new batteries for the P6 truss, a spare drive unit for the Mobile Transporter and a spare boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna. Mark Polansky will be Endeavour's commander with Doug Hurley as pilot. Mission specialists will be Christopher Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, Dave Wolf, Tim Kopra and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette. Kopra will become a station flight engineer replacing Koichi Wakata, who will return home with the STS-127 crew. It will be the 29th shuttle flight to the station.

  • July 30 -- Atlantis (STS-128 / 17A) launches on its 31st flight, an 11-day mission carrying science and storage racks to the station. In the payload bay will be a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module holding science and storage racks. Three spacewalks are planned to remove and replace a materials processing experiment outside the European Space Agency's Columbus module and return an empty ammonia tank assembly. The mission includes the rotation of astronaut Nicole Stott for Tim Kopra, who will return to Earth with the shuttle crew. The remaining crew members have yet to be named. STS-128 marks the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and outfitting.

  • Oct. 15 -- Discovery's (STS-129 / ULF-3) 37th mission will focus on staging spare components outside the station. The 15-day flight includes at least three spacewalks. The payload bay will carry two large External Logistics Carriers holding two spare gyroscopes, two nitrogen tank assemblies, two pump modules, an ammonia tank assembly, a spare latching end effector for the station's robotic arm, a spare trailing umbilical system for the Mobile Transporter and a high-pressure gas tank. Canadian Space Agency astronaut Bob Thirsk will return home aboard Discovery with its crew, which has yet to be named. STS-129 marks the 31st shuttle mission devoted to station assembly.

  • Dec. 10 -- Endeavour (STS-130 / 20A) will close 2009 with its 24th mission to deliver the final connecting node, Node 3, and the Cupola, a robotic control station with six windows around its sides and another in the center that provides a 360-degree view around the station. At least three spacewalks are planned during the 11-day mission. The 32nd station assembly mission by a shuttle does not yet have a crew named.
Shuttle Flights in 2010
  • Feb. 11 -- Atlantis (STS-131 / 19A) begins its 32nd mission as the first flight in 2010, carrying a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks that will be transferred to laboratories of the station. The 11-day mission will include at least three spacewalks to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly outside the station and return a European experiment that has been outside the Columbus module. It will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. The crew has yet to be named.

  • April 8 -- Discovery's (STS-132 / ULF-4) 38th mission will carry an integrated cargo carrier to deliver maintenance and assembly hardware, including spare parts for space station systems. In addition, the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, a Mini Research Module, will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. The first Russian Mini Research Module to go to the station is scheduled to launch on a Russian rocket in the summer of 2009.

    Additionally, at least three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. The laboratory module is scheduled for launch on a Russian rocket in 2011. The mission marks the 34th mission to the station. The STS-132 crew has yet to be named.

  • May 31 -- Endeavour's (STS-133 / ULF-5) 25th mission will carry critical spare components that will be placed on the outside of the station. Those will include two S-band communications antennas, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields. At least three spacewalks are planned to be carried out by the crew, which has yet to be named. The 15-day mission will be the 35th to the station.

GACspaceguy
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posted 07-08-2008 05:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can I assume that there are eight (8) confirmed flights and two contingency flights for a total of ten (10) potential flights? Would one of these contingency flights be used for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-08-2008 06:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The "contingency" flights are included in the count of eight missions to launch during 2009 and 2010. The count omits STS-125 and STS-126 launching in 2008 as their target dates were decided earlier.

Should the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer fly, it would be on a yet to be manifested mission not included in this count (at least according to current plans).

GACspaceguy
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posted 07-08-2008 10:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I see, thanks for the clarification Robert.

contra
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posted 07-29-2008 07:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for contra   Click Here to Email contra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any idea at what time STS-119 will be launched if Feb 12 date holds?

Ben
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posted 09-23-2008 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A rough estimate is 10am EST 8am plus or minus an hour or so. Mid-morning, let's say.

Ben
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posted 09-24-2008 01:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Someone asked me how I can calculate that: The launch time for ISS flights is 23-25 minutes earlier each day. Averageing 24 per day, that's 720 every 30 days which is exactly 12 hours.

With Nov. 12 being 8:43pm EST, that would make Feb. 12 roughly 8:43am EST, however December and January have 31 days (twice more subtracing 24 mins), and with slight variations here and there, we come up with roughly an 8:00am launch to be more specific.

Ben
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posted 09-24-2008 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Announces New Target Launch Dates

The target launch date for space shuttle Atlantis' STS-125 mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope has been reset to Oct. 14 at 10:19 p.m. EDT. A news conference is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to announce an official launch date.

With the delay of Atlantis' launch from Oct. 10 to Oct. 14, shuttle Endeavour's STS-126 supply mission to the International Space Station, also will move from Nov. 12 to Nov. 16 at 7:07 p.m. EST. The target launch date adjustments were made Wednesday during the Space Shuttle Program's Flight Readiness Review, which concludes Thursday.

Detailed assessments were presented Wednesday by Mission Operations, Flight Crew Operations, and training divisions affected by the closure of the NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, as a result of Hurricane Ike. While vehicle processing at Kennedy continues on schedule, the lost week of training and mission preparation due to the impacts of the storm led to the decision to slip the dates.

The Oct. 3 news conference will follow the Flight Readiness Review, a meeting to assess preparations for the STS-125 mission to Hubble, and will begin no earlier than 4 p.m. EDT.

The briefing participants are:

  • Associate Administrator for Space Operations Bill Gerstenmaier
  • Deputy Associate Administrator for Programs, Science Mission Directorate Mike Luther
  • Space Shuttle Program Manager John Shannon
  • STS-125 Launch Director Ed Mango
NASA Television and the agency's Web site will broadcast the briefing live.

StarDome
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posted 01-02-2009 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for StarDome   Click Here to Email StarDome     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am planning on being in Florida in May for the shuttle launch(es), however, does anyone know if NASA is still planning on the 2 launches in a week for STS-125 & STS-127? in May 09?

I heard STS-125? may be rescheduled for an Ares booster test?

Ben
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posted 01-02-2009 11:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If STS-125 is May 12, STS-127 will be retargeted for mid-June. The Ares test is tentatively slated for mid-July from pad B but is likely to slip if STS-125 is indeed May, as pad B would be used for the rescue shuttle (this is what is preventing pad B from being readied for Ares). They cannot launch two shuttle missions from the same pad nominally closer than a few weeks apart, however...

NASA stated they might examine using pad A for the rescue flight, which must be launched within one week of 125, but it seems unlikely at this time.

StarDome
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posted 01-02-2009 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for StarDome   Click Here to Email StarDome     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for that, thats pretty much what I figured.

I hope to see STS 125 launch to be honest but any will be great.

Ben
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posted 01-02-2009 11:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA will continue to target 127 for May 15 in case 125 needs to slip out again, so one or the other is on track for mid-May.

125 May 12 would be just after 1pm; 127 May 15 would be about 7pm.

StarDome
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posted 01-05-2009 03:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for StarDome   Click Here to Email StarDome     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Ben, that's great. Looking forward to May now. If you hear anything else let us know.

neke
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posted 05-06-2009 07:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for neke   Click Here to Email neke     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So now that the STS-127 launch is showing for June 13...

Do you think I would have time to watch a launch at 7:19 AM, fight my way out of traffic, drive across the state and be in Clearwater in time to get myself and my two boys ready for my sister's wedding at 6 PM??

It's going to kill me if I'm in Florida when there's a launch and I can't go!

KSCartist
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posted 05-06-2009 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The best way to do that is to watch the launch along the river in Titusville. As soon as the SRBs drop off jump in your car and get out of town. You should be able to stay just ahead of the traffic that way.

KAPTEC
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posted 05-06-2009 11:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KAPTEC   Click Here to Email KAPTEC     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Someone is going to be killed by his sister... Good luck Neke!

Mr Meek
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posted 05-06-2009 11:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Even without traffic in Titusville/KSC and Orlando, it's about a 3 hour drive. I'd say you could do it, but follow Tim's recommendations on location and departure. Good luck!

neke
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posted 05-06-2009 09:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for neke   Click Here to Email neke     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the info. I'm going, if the launch date doesn't change! It sounds like even if I do hit heavy traffic, I should be back by early afternoon at the worst. I will definitely check in to watching it from Titusville. Then I'll be going back on June 15th to visit KSC, which I've never been to.

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