Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Shuttles - Space Station
  STS-120: Hatch closing and ISS undocking

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   STS-120: Hatch closing and ISS undocking
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-04-2007 11:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The STS-120 crew is scheduled to bid farewell to the Expedition 16 crew before the hatches close at 12:43 p.m. CST between Discovery and the station. Discovery is slated to undock a little after 4:30 a.m. Monday.

In today, execute package uplinked to the crew by mission control, flight controllers reminded the STS-120 crew to transfer two special items:

kyra
Member

Posts: 507
From: Louisville CO US
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 11-04-2007 01:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
In today, execute package uplinked to the crew by mission control, flight controllers reminded the STS-120 crew to transfer two special items...
Robert, Thanks for posting - LOL on item #900, by any chance was item #901 Mr. Clay's Dog? Ohhh Noooo!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-04-2007 01:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Unless Mr. Bill's Clay's dog looks a lot like Dan Tani, then sadly no.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-04-2007 03:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The hatches between space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station were closed at 2:25 p.m. CST.

Before separating to their respective craft, the STS-120 and ISS Expedition 16 crews gathered in the Destiny lab to bid farewell to each other.

"We have an exciting stage ahead and we're looking forward to it," radioed ISS commander Peggy Whitson, turning her attention to her arriving and departing flight engineers, Dan Tani and Clay Anderson. "He's [Tani's] proven, he's stuck with robotics yesterday, I was very impressed and of course Clay, is somebody who has been extremely entertaining for me. I've had a great time in just the few weeks that we have been here together. It's been a great opportunity for us to share, and I want to hand over the mike to him."

"When Suni [Williams] came up, we kind of started a little tradition and so I'd like to do a couple of more dedications from K-I-S-S radio and the first one is sort of self-explanatory I think, so if you would just hold on for a minute," said Anderson, as he floated over to a laptop computer to begin playback of Bing Crosby's rendition of Danny Boy.

"Welcome aboard Danno!" he said as giving Tani a big hug.

Anderson continued, "And then for me, I've got a few words I would like to say to everybody on the ground. You know Clay doesn't like to talk very much but... (laughter) but in order to carry this off I kind of had to write it down. So, if I can find it [he doesn't]... we'll just use the computer."

"So, today's my last day on-board the International Space Station Alpha and about five months ago I was lying on my back in the middeck of the orbiter Atlantis preparing to launch into orbit for the first time and wondering what the heck I had gotten myself into. And now, I am poised to return to Earth after having served very proudly on-board this magnificent complex as part of two expedition and three shuttle crews. As my time draws to a close here, I'm filled with a lot of different emotions and I have a lot of blood, sweat and tears that I've left on-board the International Space Station, it's a very wonderful place. So I want to take this time to thank each and everyone of you, you've been my special family down there on the ground for quite some time. And as is true of families on Earth, I sincerely believe that we all created some very fond memories. You all kept me safe, you've shown me unwavering patience and professionalism, (chokes up) and you've all overlooked my shortcomings and it's my hope that maybe you even had a few laughs along the way. So what I would like to say is what we're all doing here is very important, very important for all of humankind. It's worth the risk, it's worth the cost, and you folks on the ground are the people that make it happen. So I want you to take pride in your work and constantly look toward the heavens for it is there you will see your future. To all the flight control, training and engineering teams in Houston, Huntsville and Moscow, (chokes up) I say thank you, you are indeed the best and the brightest that our world has to offer."

"Hey Clay," responded capcom Kevin Ford from Mission Control in Houston. "We appreciate the words (applause in the background), a big round of applause from your ground team here and behalf of all the ground support team, great work on your expedition. We're looking forward to having you back here at home."

"And I'd like to one last dedication from K-I-S-S radio," Anderson replied. "I probably don't have a second life as a DJ but I'd like to dedicate this song to you guys on the ground, to my family, and to me."

As Anderson began playing back Collective Soul's Reunion, the STS-120 crew behind him began swaying to the music.

"Congratulations, Clay," said Ford. "And Peggy, before you pick-up again, if we could, we'd like to give you a final sign-off from your Orbit 2 team. Is that okay? But we're going to stay and watch, of course."

"Absolutely," Whitson radioed.

"We just wanted to say it's been an absolute blast working with every one of you. You really did go places we've never been before and you absolutely nailed it. Congratulations. I'm going to put your flight director on, Derrick Hassmann, for a few words. He's going to give you a parting shot and we'll see you guys real soon."

"Alpha, Houston, on 1A, it's really great to see everybody together in the lab and I just wanted to echo Kevin's comments," Hassman began. "It was an honor and a privilege to watch you guys do your work and just what an unbelievably successful mission. When I released my team today, I asked them to spend a little bit of time going back and thinking about EVAs 1 through 3, which we all worked so hard to put down and plan, it seems like a month or so ago. But those went off unbelievably well, perfectly, and the last four or five days were a complete blur. But what a a way to end the mission. Great job guys, thanks."

"Thank you Derrick," replied STS-120 commander Pam Melroy, "it's wonderful to hear your voice. And thank you to all of the Orbit 2 team, you've been fantastic."

"Alright, and we'll see some of you guys very soon, I'm looking forward to it," Hassman said.

"We are, too," replied Melroy. "I guess this is the time when Discovery officially welcomes Clay with open arms to our crew. We can't wait to bring you home to your family and we're very happy to have you. I think it's not even a question of fitting in, because our crews have matched so well. There's been a lot of laughter and a lot of fun and a lot of really hard work over the last few docked days. And it's also our time to say farewell to Dan, (chokes up) he told me not to do this. Dan has brought us so many wonderful memories and so many wonderful moments. From going to NOLS [National Outdoor Leadership School] together, all the training we have done together, and a truly incredible day together yesterday, just kind of brought so much time and so much effort all together for all of us. So we are going to miss you terribly, we promise that we will send somebody to come pick you up and bring you home. And to Peggy, thank you. It's just been a honor and a privilege to share the command of this mission with you throughout the docked time. Our personal relationship has just made it all that much better. Yuri [Malenchenko] thank you so much for all the help that you gave to us as well, we simply could not have accomplished the mission without everybody's help. So as the two crews have worked together so well, this is one we'll always remember. We're a family now."

Jay Chladek
Member

Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 11-04-2007 09:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mmmmm, the hair on "Mr. Clay" isn't quite right.

Besides Robert, you left out the best part from that last segment:

Clay: "There will be no 'Cities from Nebraska' during this dedication." :followed by applause being overheard in Mission Control:

and the encore:

Clay "There will be no 'Cities from Iowa' during increment 16." :followed by Peggy giving him a slight whack on the head:

Yup, he has been up there just a bit too long I think.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 04:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space shuttle Discovery undocked from the International Space Station at 4:32 a.m. CST.

"Houston and Alpha, Discovery has physical seperation," STS-120 commander Pam Melroy radioed.

"Shuttle departing," ISS 16 commander Peggy Whitson said while ringing the station's bell.

"Discovery copies, thanks Peggy," Melroy responded.

"Thank you guys for the module and all your help," Whitson continued, referencing Discovery's delivery of the Harmony Node 2.

Once 400 feet away from the ISS, STS-120 pilot George Zamka will perform a fly-around to allow Discovery's crew members to collect video and imagery of the station in its new configuration.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 04:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 04:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 04:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery has begun the fly-around of the ISS.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery's pilot George Zamka controlling the fly-around of the ISS.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With the fly-around complete, Discovery's engines have been fired for the first separation burn.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 06:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Second separation burn complete.

"Drive safe now," radioed Dan Tani from aboard the ISS to Discovery's crew.

"You too!" replied STS-120 commander Pam Melroy.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 10:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery's crew members are using the shuttle's robotic arm and the 50-foot long orbiter boom to conduct a late inspection of their thermal protection system for micrometeorite orbital debris (MMOD) damage.

Just after closing the hatches yesterday separating Discovery from the International Space Station, Scott Parazynski radioed flight controllers of an MMOD 'ding' in one of the shuttle's windows. The three-pane, 2.5 inch thick window is not at risk by the damage.

Download the high resolution version (2.32mb)

Philip
Member

Posts: 4803
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 11-05-2007 01:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
it looks serious but the windows are about 6 centimeters thick... they'll have to replace it during KSC shuttle turnaround!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 01:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Philip:
...they'll have to replace it during KSC shuttle turnaround!
As a matter of standard practice, the orbiters' outer panes are replaced after every landing, even if they are not subjected to MMOD damage during flight.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 03:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Space shuttle Discovery transferred 33,834 pounds of equipment and supplies to the International Space Station, including the Node 2 "Harmony" and a spare main bus switching unit (MBSU).

In return, the orbiter is landing with 2,020 pounds of cargo, including an S-band antenna assembly that spacewalkers Scott Parazynski and Doug Wheelock removed from the ISS.

In total, STS-120 added 31,814 pounds to the space station.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2007 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

This shot and more of the International Space Station after Discovery's departure are now available in high resolution from NASA's website.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement