Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Space Shuttles - Space Station
  STS-116: Discovery landing

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   STS-116: Discovery landing
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-21-2006 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Commander Mark Polansky and his crew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will complete their 13-day mission to the International Space Station Friday, Dec. 22. NASA will choose one of three potential landing sites based on weather conditions.

The different shuttle landing opportunities are (all times Eastern):

  • Kennedy Space Center, Fla.: 3:56 p.m. or 5:32 p.m.
  • Edwards Air Force Base, Calif: 5:27 p.m., 7 p.m. or 8:36 p.m.
  • White Sands Space Harbor, N.M.: 5:27 p.m. or 7:02 p.m.

MCroft04
Member

Posts: 1219
From: Smithfield, Me, USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 12-22-2006 06:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just saw on the local news here in Houston that if the shuttle makes the second landing at KSC it will travel about 20 miles north of Houston at 4:16 PM (Central time). Unfortunately it is very cloudy and rainy here, but the news said we should be able to hear the sonic boom even if we can't see it.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 10:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There's a not a cloud in the sky at present from where we are in Houston (near JSC), but it doesn't look good weather-wise for a KSC landing today...

MCroft04
Member

Posts: 1219
From: Smithfield, Me, USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 12-22-2006 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I knew I'd get caught on the bad weather forecast; should have gone outside to look before speaking. But it's probably all for naught.

Michael Davis
Member

Posts: 353
From: Houston, Texas
Registered: Aug 2002

posted 12-22-2006 11:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Michael Davis   Click Here to Email Michael Davis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep, a perfect day in Houston and my balcony faces north...a perfect view. So of course they'll land 1500 miles to the west of me...

spaced out
Member

Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 12-22-2006 12:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just tried to catch the Shuttle as it was predicted to pass overhead here in Paris this evening but somehow I missed it. Maybe the orbit has changed from that shown on Heavens-Above as they prepare for landing.

Instead 10 minutes later I caught the ISS coming over just as predicted. Here's a rushed attempt to catch it on camera:

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 01:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.: 3:56 p.m.
Due to unstable weather conditions (rain showers in the area) at KSC, NASA has waived the first attempt at landing in Florida.

AstronautBrian
Member

Posts: 235
From: Madisonville, Louisiana, U.S.A.
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 12-22-2006 01:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstronautBrian   Click Here to Email AstronautBrian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Next chances are:

Edwards - 3:19 de-orbit burn; 4:27 landing

White Sands - 3:20 de-orbit burn; 4:27 landing

Kennedy - 3:26 de-orbit burn; 4:32 landing

Times are CST.

Hoping for a Kennedy landing - it will pass directly over my house! Cloudy and rainy but I like to hear that BOOM BOOM!

------------------
"I am sui generis; just leave it at that." - Huey P. Long

OV-105
Member

Posts: 589
From: Ridgecrest, CA USA
Registered: Sep 2000

posted 12-22-2006 01:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think they are going to be going to Eddie today. Weather is real nice out here on the desert right now.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 01:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by OV-105:
I think they are going to be going to Eddie today. Weather is real nice out here on the desert right now.
Though anything can happen, weather at EAFB is currently red (i.e. "no go") due to predicted high cross winds.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 03:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Edwards Air Force Base, Calif: 5:27 p.m.
Due to unpredictable and high cross winds at Edwards, the first attempt at landing in California has been waived.

FutureAstronaut
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 12-22-2006 03:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FutureAstronaut   Click Here to Email FutureAstronaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looks like a "Go" for Kennedy.

------------------
Mike

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 03:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Discovery will flyover Houston (about 20 miles north of the city) at 4:16 p.m. CST. We will be attempting to catch it by camera and record its sonic boom as well.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 04:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No luck seeing Discovery but as luck would have it, just as I turned off my recorder, the sonic boom was clearly audible. Boom!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 04:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Home for the holidays!

Space shuttle Discovery, the crew of STS-116 and ISS Expedition 13/14 Flight Engineer Thomas Reiter are safely home, having touched down at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility in Florida at 5:32 p.m. EST at a mission elapsed time of 12 days, 20 hours and 45 minutes.

[Edited by Robert Pearlman (December 22, 2006).]

Michael Davis
Member

Posts: 353
From: Houston, Texas
Registered: Aug 2002

posted 12-22-2006 04:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Michael Davis   Click Here to Email Michael Davis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I heard the double sonic boom as well. But much later than I anticipated. I never saw the shuttle though.

KSCartist
Member

Posts: 2488
From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 12-22-2006 06:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What a great mission and a great year for our space program!

Way to go NASA and contractor team - great job!

Tim

MCroft04
Member

Posts: 1219
From: Smithfield, Me, USA
Registered: Mar 2005

posted 12-22-2006 07:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MCroft04   Click Here to Email MCroft04     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone heard yet when the crew will arrive at Ellington (presumably tomorrow Nov 23)?

AstronautBrian
Member

Posts: 235
From: Madisonville, Louisiana, U.S.A.
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 12-22-2006 07:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstronautBrian   Click Here to Email AstronautBrian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was too cloudy to see Discovery pass over, but I did hear the sonic booms! Music to my ears. My family and I were eating at a Chilis and at 4:15 I excused myself and went outside. I waited for about five minutes, heard the booms, and went back in to finish my meal. My wife was understanding. :-)

------------------
"I am sui generis; just leave it at that." - Huey P. Long

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 07:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MCroft04:
Has anyone heard yet when the crew will arrive at Ellington (presumably tomorrow Nov 23)?
As mentioned both on the front page of the site and on the Sightings calendar, crew return is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. EST on December 23 in Hangar 276. Note: Gate 18 (located at Brantly and Highway 3, near Hangar 276) will open at 3:30 p.m. and is the only entrance available for this event.

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1488
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 12-22-2006 07:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't understand something. They go through great pains to not fly it through wet weather back from Edwards when it lands there. They keep the rotating service structure closed over it when it's on the pad to keep the rain off it.

There it sits on the shuttle landing strip in the pouring rain! I thought that rain was damaging to the shuttle???

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-22-2006 08:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ejectr:
I thought that rain was damaging to the shuttle???
Water (rain) by itself, is not damaging to the shuttle's exterior services. The tiles themselves are waterproofed to an extent.

Rain is a concern during launch and landing because of the velocities involved.

NASA does not want to launch a vehicle with wet tiles either, because when they get into orbit the water can freeze and then you run the risk that the tiles will debond.

It takes time to thoroughly dry a wet orbiter. Time that can eat into your turnaround to launch again. In the case of Discovery however, its next launch is not until Fall 2007. As such, it wasn't as much a concern today that it should sit in the rain after landing.

WSTFphoto
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 12-22-2006 08:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for WSTFphoto   Click Here to Email WSTFphoto     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was an honor to spend the day on station at WSSH (NOR). We were ready.

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1488
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 12-23-2006 06:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for that explanation, Robert. I had an inkling that it had something to do with tile damage and ice before or during flight, but couldn't see the connection after flight as with a trip on the 747 through the rain.

Now I know, thanks.

[Edited by ejectr (December 23, 2006).]

Tom
Member

Posts: 1275
From: New York
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 12-23-2006 07:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
With Discovery touching down right at "sun-set", would this be considered a "night landing"?
Thanks.

Spaceflyer
Member

Posts: 140
From: Nauheim, Germany
Registered: Jan 2003

posted 12-23-2006 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spaceflyer   Click Here to Email Spaceflyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No, sunset plus 15 minutes, than it will be considered a night landing.
Gerhard

gliderpilotuk
Member

Posts: 3043
From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 12-23-2006 08:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Rain is a concern during launch and landing because of the velocities involved.

Not sure velocity is as much of an issue on landing as the impact of rain on the glide ratio - although, given that it is not flown at "best glide" this is also probably not that significant. By the time the shuttle reaches cloudbase it has decelerated significantly. Icing on the wings could be a risk but as the precipitation level is <10k ft (I presume) and the shuttle is rapidly descending into warmer air the risk is mitigated.

Paul

ea757grrl
Member

Posts: 555
From: South Carolina
Registered: Jul 2006

posted 12-23-2006 11:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ea757grrl   Click Here to Email ea757grrl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tom:
With Discovery touching down right at "sun-set", would this be considered a "night landing"?

I don't know if it'll be "officially" considered a night landing, but I was watching when the word was sent up that touchdown time would be right at sunset. Commander Polansky replied something like, "Hey, I'll finally get to log a night landing." CAPCOM Ken Ham replied, "We'll give it to you."

As I said, though, I don't know if that'll count as an *official* night landing, but I did get a chuckle out of the conversation. Regardless, it was still an absolutely gorgeous landing.

jodie

Ben
Member

Posts: 1843
From: Daytona Beach, FL
Registered: May 2000

posted 12-23-2006 08:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was a day landing by NASA's 15-minute post and pre-sun rule, as mentioned above.


[Edited by Ben (December 23, 2006).]

[Edited by Ben (December 23, 2006).]

Ben Watson
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 12-23-2006 11:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben Watson   Click Here to Email Ben Watson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It is my understanding that the pilot traditionally flies the shuttle around the Heading Alignment Circle (HAC) and then the commander takes over for the final approach and landing. The purpose apparently is to allow the pilot to get a little "stick time." However, during the approach yesterday, it was specifically remarked that Commander Polansky was flying the shuttle through the HAC. Does anyone know why Pilot Oefelein did not perform this manuever?

OV-105
Member

Posts: 589
From: Ridgecrest, CA USA
Registered: Sep 2000

posted 12-23-2006 11:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Speaking of night landings, anyone know who has the most? I would think there are a lot with 1 maybe 2. Also which shuttle has had the nost night landings. I bet someone has this info.

Tom
Member

Posts: 1275
From: New York
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 12-23-2006 11:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Eileen Collins last 2 flights that she commanded (STS-93 and STS-114) were night landings.
Also, Brent Jetts last 2 flights (STS-97 and STS-115) landed at night.

Columbia 5
Challenger 1
Discovery 7
Atlantis 4
Endeavour 4


[Edited by Tom (December 24, 2006).]

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement