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  Beyoncé samples STS-51L audio for song "XO" (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   Beyoncé samples STS-51L audio for song "XO"
Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-30-2013 04:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Beyoncé Challenger shuttle disaster audio clip upsets astronauts' families

Beyoncé is ending the year on a sour note with members of the NASA community.

The pop singer included an audio clip from the 1986 space shuttle Challenger disaster as part of her new song, "XO." The track was released Dec. 13 as part of Beyoncé's new self-titled album...

"We were disappointed to learn that an audio clip from the day we lost our heroic Challenger crew was used in the song 'XO,'" June Scobee Rodgers, the widow of STS-51L commander Richard "Dick" Scobee and founding chair of the Challenger Center for Space Science Education, wrote in a statement released Monday. "The moment included in this song is an emotionally difficult one for the Challenger families, colleagues and friends."

(Beyoncé's response, as she told to ABC News, is included in the above article.)

dom
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posted 12-30-2013 05:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Crass and tasteless. The song is nice but the audio adds absolutely nothing and I wonder if it was added just for publicity? Which would make it more offensive...

mode1charlie
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posted 12-30-2013 05:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mode1charlie   Click Here to Email mode1charlie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is in very poor taste. I can understand why the families are not happy.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-30-2013 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dom:
I wonder if it was added just for publicity?
I doubt it; the album, which was released without any prior notice, topped the charts on its own merits. It didn't (and still doesn't) need additional publicity.

Rather, I wonder if Beyoncé's decision to use (and now defend using) the audio clip says something more about how the tragedy is now perceived in pop culture?

bwhite1976
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posted 12-30-2013 08:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bwhite1976   Click Here to Email bwhite1976     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I imagine her target audience will hear this and have absolutely no idea what this actual audio clip is or where it comes from.

I agree in that is does say a lot about current pop culture. As someone who remembers that day as if it were yesterday, I listen to the first few seconds of the song which contain the audio clip and think of nothing else throughout the song. Beyoncé, or whomever wrote/produced this song, assumes that the audience will hear the audio clip, and not make an association with the Challenger disaster, but see it as a way to better connect with the meaning of the song.

Cozmosis22
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posted 12-30-2013 09:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can't blame it all on her. Like most "artists" today, she is totally amblivious to the hurt this could cause. How about the music editors, producers and managers who also saw no problem with sampling the NASA audio without permission? And if some people from the space agency authorized the use of that audio this way for profit... they should be fired.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-30-2013 09:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The audio clip is in the public domain, as is all NASA imagery and audio. No permission was needed from NASA, nor does its use denote endorsement (which is the only reason the space agency could object to its use).

One could argue that the audio is famous enough for Nesbitt to be identifiable, but then permission would rest with him, not with NASA. To my knowledge, he has not sought to control the use of the audio in other (albeit less controversial) projects.

randy
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posted 12-30-2013 10:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for randy   Click Here to Email randy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I definitely won't buy it. Truly tactless and very tasteless. I have read some other articles about this, and apparently it has ruffled some feathers at NASA, too.

GoesTo11
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posted 12-30-2013 10:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GoesTo11   Click Here to Email GoesTo11     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beyonce is now one of the world's biggest pop stars, and I very much doubt that she had any clue as to the significance of the audio clip, or whether it was even used. It's on the producers of this video, and it's a sad commentary on how far removed the Challenger loss has faded from popular culture. Just another sound bite in 2014.

Cozmosis22
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posted 12-30-2013 10:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Cozmosis22     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
The audio clip is in the public domain, as is all NASA imagery and audio. No permission was needed from NASA...
At least in the olden days with NASA photos, a message on the back stated "it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising, posters, books, etc, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release." Can't imagine why a similar request wouldn't also apply to mission audio used in music.

Earlier today Keith Cowing over at NASA Watch condemned the misuse of the 51-L audiofeed as "inappropriate in the extreme" and "If this was done with full knowledge of the origin of these words then this is simply repugnant."

Rob Joyner
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posted 12-31-2013 01:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If her "heart" sincerely "goes out to the families of those lost in the Challenger disaster," then she would have contacted them about using the clip first.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-31-2013 01:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Cozmosis22:
Can't imagine why a similar request wouldn't also apply to mission audio used in music.
NASA's current multimedia-use policy can be found here. It includes audio files.

The only requirement is that "if the NASA material is to be used for commercial purposes... it must not explicitly or implicitly convey NASA's endorsement."

If not copyrighted, NASA material may be reproduced and distributed without further permission from NASA.
The only caution that it offers that may be applicable to this situation is:
If a recognizable person, or talent (e.g., an astronaut or a noted personality engaged to narrate a film) appears in NASA material, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. Therefore, permission should be obtained from the recognizable person or talent.
As NASA's policy notes however, if the audio falls under "constitutionally protected media uses" (including fair use) than such use will "generally be considered not to infringe such personal rights."

As our article notes, NASA issued a response to the song, which did not mention or require permission for the audio clip to be used:

The Challenger accident is an important part of our history; a tragic reminder that space exploration is risky and should never be trivialized. NASA works everyday to honor the legacy of our fallen astronauts as we carry out our mission to reach for new heights and explore the universe.
(And with that all being said, less there be any confusion, I am not personally defending her decision to use the clip, only that by NASA's policies, she did not require the space agency's permission before doing so.)

cspg
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posted 12-31-2013 04:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
All this baffles me. Is NASA audio off limit? I can understand that the family is upset as well as sone space afficionados because we all know what it refers to but other than that, it's just the voice of mission control that is being used not the crew's. I fail to see how this would lead to labelling the song as "repugnant."

She's an artist and you like her or not. She makes choices which will please some and disturb others. And she's getting slammed because she's famous and that her album hit the top of charts? Are those who are that offended by this have checked with ALL artists ALL OVER the world since 1986 to see if those audio transcripts have not been used before? No.

Beyoncé's music is not my type so frankly I don't really care. It must have been a slow news day.

Philip
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posted 12-31-2013 05:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Incredible, artists seem to be anxious to get attention whatever which matter... tasteless!

Gonzo
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posted 12-31-2013 08:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gonzo   Click Here to Email Gonzo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't listen to her music and I have not listened to the audio she used. Nor do I intend to. However, here's another perspective.

"There's no such thing as bad publicity." Which means, in this case, making a big fuss over what she's done, whether you agree with it or not, only bolsters her popularity. The worst thing you can do to an "artist" (term used loosely in this case) is ignore them. Therefore, by making a big fuss over this, it only helps her.

onesmallstep
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posted 12-31-2013 09:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for onesmallstep   Click Here to Email onesmallstep     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I doubt very much that Beyoncé had 'no clue' as to the meaning and context of the clip-she has worked with NASA in the past, specifically recording a wake-up greeting for the STS-135/Atlantis crew in 2011. Given her involvement and interest in the space program (however brief), yes, she should have reached out to some of the families or former astronauts to gauge their reactions. Perhaps a collage of the crew portraits for Challenger and Columbia would have worked better (although good only on the music video, of course).

As to 51L (and maybe even STS-107) now being a mere footnote in history to most young people; the online Rolling Stone article I read this morning mentions the '..STS-8 Challenger exploded..' and even repeats the error in their picture gallery. Luckily, an alert reader posted a response listing STS-8 as having launched in 1983.

dom
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posted 12-31-2013 12:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well I hope she is now given the cold shoulder by NASA as they gave her some good publicity/access to the space programme in the past and this is how she repays them!

The more I think about this, the more disrespectful it is and I hope NASA makes her fully aware of how bad it has gone down with anyone who was affected by the Challenger explosion.

David Stephenson
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posted 12-31-2013 12:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David Stephenson   Click Here to Email David Stephenson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is really tasteless, I feel for the Challenger families.

tegwilym
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posted 12-31-2013 02:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tegwilym   Click Here to Email tegwilym     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As said above, her audience probably has no idea what that clip is from, probably no idea that there ever was a space shuttle, and think the moon landings were a hoax.

I hear that first clip and the vision of streaming white wreckage immediately comes to my mind. Challenger, 9/11, Columbia are videos that I have seen way too many times, and always disturbing to see.

Well, this is the "Honey Boo Boo" generation. Ugh!

JBoe
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posted 12-31-2013 02:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JBoe   Click Here to Email JBoe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I noticed that Top 40 stations in the DC area have been playing her song with out the STS-51L/NASA audio. I think the "modified" version of "XO" is a result of the public as well as her apology.

mjanovec
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posted 12-31-2013 07:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"The songwriters included the [NASA] audio in tribute to the unselfish work of the Challenger crew with hope that they will never be forgotten," the singer added.
If this was their true intention, I can only assume they will want to donate a significant portion of the profits from the song to the Challenger Center for Space Science Education.

But something tells me that they probably won't be doing that...

LM1
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posted 12-31-2013 09:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM1   Click Here to Email LM1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beyoncé is talented and gifted in many ways. We will never forget the Challenger STS-51L crew (or the Columbia STS-107 crew or the Apollo-1 crew). She should not have used the NASA clips in her pop song "XO". Now that she has used it, it would be an appropriate gesture on her part if she gave a huge contribution to an appropriate charity. This would be widely reported and would encourage other charitable contributions in this holiday season.

alanh_7
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posted 12-31-2013 09:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sadly the more this story gains traction in the news, it will likely increase sales of her album rather than detract anyone from buying it.

cspg
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posted 01-01-2014 07:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So even if her album is "great", people shouldn't be buying it because of those 6 seconds? In that case, I guess that back in the 80s, I shouldn't have bought a CD (oops, vinyl) from a German band whose opening track is a direct reference to a Nazi "song"...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-01-2014 07:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not surprisingly, the news has inspired editorial cartoons, including this one by Ed Hall.

chet
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posted 01-02-2014 02:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for chet   Click Here to Email chet     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't know if anyone else may have noticed, but Beyonce does tend to lapse into instances of self-absorption and insensitivity (ahem) at times, so it'd be my guess she and her producers simply didn't give the matter very much thought before deciding to use the audio for their own artistic endeavors (no pun intended).

If it's true the 51-L sampling has been removed and will not appear in future copies or broadcasts, I'd give her credit for at least understanding and correcting the mistake. If not we'll know soon enough her apology wasn't actually heartfelt after all.

ejectr
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posted 01-02-2014 08:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just a factor of present standing. Some day they will all say "Beyoncé who?"

robsouth
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posted 01-02-2014 10:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can you just picture the scene at that song production meeting?

'Ok everyone, what's the best way of representing the end of a relationship?'

'How about the death of seven people in an explosion?'

'Great! Lets go with that.'

I mean, come on! What were they thinking! This is bad taste in the extreme.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-02-2014 10:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Except, according to Beyoncé's statement, the song is not meant to reflect the end of a relationship, but rather the unexpected loss of a loved one.
The song 'XO' was recorded with the sincerest intention to help heal those who have lost loved ones and to remind us that unexpected things happen.

robsouth
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posted 01-02-2014 10:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah! That makes it all ok then.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-02-2014 11:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It doesn't, but it places the use into its proper context.

The question then becomes when, if ever, does that particular sound clip become acceptable for use?

For example, Herbert Morrison's eyewitness radio report of the Hindenburg disaster has been widely used in pop culture, even to comedic effect. "Oh, the humanity!" Yet despite 35 people dying that day, you rarely, if ever, hear anyone object to its use.

Steve Nesbitt was a radio announcer, just like Morrison, narrating a tragedy as it unfolded. So what inspires the outrage for Beyoncé's use and not "Wayne's World" use of "Oh, the humanity!" in 1992 (for example).

robsouth
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posted 01-02-2014 11:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm guessing the passage of time.

The Challenger disaster is still relatively recent and fresh in the memories of a lot of people.

How time can erase some of the sensitivity surrounding an event can be seen in the murder of President Kennedy. I can't imagine the autopsy photos being used for anything in the weeks or months after the event, but now they appear in films and documentaries on the subject.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-02-2014 11:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So, if we use the Hindenburg as an example, we have about another decade before the clip becomes acceptable in pop culture.

"Oh, the humanity!" was used in 1978 on the sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati," 41 years after the Hindenburg disaster. (I don't know if that was its first ever use, but it's the earliest example noted by TV Tropes.)

This Jan. 28 will mark 28 years since the Challenger disaster.

Or maybe there is a difference between using the words, rather than the audio.

robsouth
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posted 01-02-2014 11:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for robsouth     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can you put a time frame on when something becomes acceptable for such use? Yes, with the exception of one very significant event in history, everything gradually becomes, 'fair game', for use in popular media, even for comedic purposes unfortunately.

Fra Mauro
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posted 01-02-2014 02:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's tasteless and should be ignored. If spaceflight was more of a p.c. issue, there would be an uproar.

What makes her feel she has to heal people? However, I should never expect anything from a Hollywood type.

onesmallstep
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posted 01-02-2014 02:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for onesmallstep   Click Here to Email onesmallstep     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The controversy over Beyoncé's sampling of the 51L audio brings up the whole matter of history, memory and commemoration. Being such a public and well-known historic event, the Challenger tragedy inevitably led to many books, monuments, songs, tributes and events dedicated to the mission. As the years have gone by, you now have two groups who would have reacted to the controversy: NASA, astronaut families and informed people (like those on cS) on one side, and the larger, uninformed public who buys or listens to her songs in the other.

Since the whole issue revolves around the insensitivity of using audio from that tragic day, and not the right of Beyoncé (or any other artist/author/performer) to talk or express what they think as protected by the First Amendment, I think the use of images and sound from a more recent tragedy, 9/11, would be helpful. Almost as soon as the events unfolded, people have used (and abused) that tragic day for their own commercial, artistic or political ends.

New York City passed laws barring the sale of unofficial albums or souvenirs within several blocks of the World Trade Center site, yet Oliver Stone put out a film of 9/11 that (for him, at least) was restrained and apolitical. It did feature several seconds of graphic footage of people jumping to escape the flames from the towers, but only the terrible, muted sound of the bodies impacting the ground. And the renegade street artist 'Bansky' recently painted images of the twin towers with smoke pouring out on one of the NY building facades he used as a 'canvas'. Graffiti to some, a work of art to others (that drawing and others are now preserved behind makeshift plexiglass 'frames').

So the point of contention seems to be how and why the audio clip was used, and what meaning it gives to the events in 1986. If Beyoncé wanted to represent sudden, tragic loss, then the audio part would not be familiar, except for a select, informed group. Perhaps for the music video, a montage of the late Pres. Reagan reading excerpts of John Gillespie Magee's 'High Flight' poem during his TV address and a Challenger crew photo would have had more meaning. And the families being informed of its use would have softened the impact. She could also have donated part of the proceeds of downloading the song to the Challenger center or another worthy cause.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-04-2014 10:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wired's Douglas Wolk writes in defense of Beyoncé's use of the Challenger audio.
Beyoncé's music has drawn on the language of space flight for years. As Forrest Wickman noted at Slate, Beyoncé includes a song called "Rocket," she sang "Lift Off" on Jay-Z and Kanye West's Watch the Throne, and she suggested her hometown relationship to NASA on 2011′s "Countdown" when she sang, London speed it up, Houston rock it. She even recorded a wake-up call for the crew of the final shuttle mission, STS-135.

What the "XO" sample does isn't irreverent, nor is it irrelevant to the rest of the song. It does what all samples do: It alludes, quickly, to something its ideal listeners are presumed to already know about. Nesbitt's quote on Beyoncé doesn't mention the Challenger or even the space shuttle: It makes no sense unless you know it's meant to signify something terrible. Even the term "major malfunction," which entered common parlance after Nesbitt's broadcast, almost immediately drifted away from its context (notably, it popped up in the 1987 film Full Metal Jacket, set 20 years earlier).

"XO" is also far from the first time Nesbitt's commentary has been sampled. The first instance was Keith LeBlanc's "Major Malfunction," a dance track recorded only days after the Challenger exploded and released shortly thereafter — with a video featuring images of the catastrophe...

sts205cdr
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posted 01-05-2014 03:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for sts205cdr   Click Here to Email sts205cdr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Big Head Todd and the Monsters did a wonderful song post-Columbia that included a very short clip of the Challenger break up, so I feel it's possible to use these documents in an artful, respectful way. The song was titled Blue Sky.

Ronpur
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posted 01-05-2014 06:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ronpur   Click Here to Email Ronpur     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I rather listen to RUSH's Countdown than Beyonce.

issman1
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posted 01-06-2014 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Spirited defence of the indefensible by Wired highlighting the furore over a tragedy 28 years ago which the world largely forgot - until Beyonce's faux pas.

Does Beyonce have to appease those directly affected or has she artistic license to use audio or video as she pleases?

In the end, the most tangible memorial to the Challenger crew is how we honour them. Give Beyonce the chance to do that before condemning her outright.


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