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  Computer-driven pressurized spacesuit (EEAS)

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Author Topic:   Computer-driven pressurized spacesuit (EEAS)
moorouge
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Posts: 1490
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 07-15-2013 07:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In a book I'm reading the glossary lists an EEAS (Electronic Elastomeric Activity Suit). It's described as a mechanical compression garment worn by astronauts that uses computer controlled compressible material to maintain near sea-level pressure whilst the wearer is in a vacuum.

Fact or fiction? If the former - anyone heard of it or knows how it works?

alanh_7
Member

Posts: 889
From: Ajax, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 07-15-2013 08:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for alanh_7   Click Here to Email alanh_7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I read an article some time ago in Popular Mechanics or one of those technology magazines about Mechanical Counter Pressure Suits using skin tight mechanically assisted materials to replace gas pressure suits that in theory can improve flexibility for future astronauts. I think MIT did some studies on the theory but I am not sure if NASA is actually working on the development of this technology.

kr4mula
Member

Posts: 599
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 07-15-2013 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The concept for the mechanical counterpressure suit has been around at least since the '50s, if not longer. The problem is getting them to work without being unbearably uncomfortable for the wearer. MIT has been working on this using new materials that will be much better than anything tried in decades past. I'm sure they're not the only ones, either.

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