Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Free Space
  Space history on television game shows (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Space history on television game shows
spaceflori
Member

Posts: 1380
From: Germany
Registered: May 2000

posted 04-30-2005 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I could have won the 1 million Euro at the German edition of "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" today (still very popular here):
Who was the third man on the moon?
Well, the lady stopped and took the 500,000 Euro. Damn...

mdmyer
Member

Posts: 899
From: Humboldt KS USA
Registered: Dec 2003

posted 04-30-2005 04:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mdmyer   Click Here to Email mdmyer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I remember that question on "our" Millionaire show. This was before I started to read as much about the space program as I do now. My first thought was Alan Shepard or Alan Bean. The choices were Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Pete Conrad, and Wally Schirra. Without any "Alans" listed I knew it was Pete Conrad. I also remember that one of the first Millionaire questions was how far is the Earth from the Sun.

I wish I could get on that show and have to answer questions like that.

ColinBurgess
Member

Posts: 1571
From: Sydney, Australia
Registered: Sep 2003

posted 04-30-2005 04:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
About two years ago, the million-dollar question on the Australian version of "Who Wants to be a Millionaire" was even easier: how many men had walked on the moon? The guy reasoned it out and said if he had the guts to answer he would say twelve. But he also wimped out and took the half million.

november25
Member

Posts: 646
From: Douglas, Isle of Man, UK
Registered: Feb 2004

posted 04-30-2005 05:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for november25   Click Here to Email november25     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Theres nothing like being an "armchair millionaire" -- the questions seem easy but we cannot win money through the air, what a shame. I missed a few thousand tonight.

Blackarrow
Member

Posts: 2096
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 05-01-2005 12:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My nightmare is getting to the last question on "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" and being asked: "Who was the last man on the Moon?" The choices are Gene Cernan; Jack Schmitt; John Young; Charlie Duke. I answer: "Cernan." I am told: "Wrong! Twelve men, Schmitt was twelfth." I argue the obvious points, I get told the show's decision is final, I lose €968,000 ($1,750,000). I wake up in a cold sweat...

Rodina
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 05-01-2005 03:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rodina   Click Here to Email Rodina     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaceflori:
"Who was the third man on the moon?"
What were the other three options?

spacecraft films
Member

Posts: 802
From: Columbus, OH USA
Registered: Jun 2002

posted 05-01-2005 03:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
My nightmare is getting to the last question on "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" and being asked: "Who was the last man on the Moon?"
I have imagined being asked that same question on a game show. I would ask to clarify before answering. For me, I had a dream it was a final Jeopardy question, and I wrote: "Last man to set foot on moon: Who is Jack Schmitt? Last man to leave moon: Who is Gene Cernan?" None of the other contestants got it right (they answered Buzz Aldrin) so I won!

That question demands clarification... or two answers.

spaceflori
Member

Posts: 1380
From: Germany
Registered: May 2000

posted 05-01-2005 03:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rodina:
What were the other three options?
The options were Swigert, Conrad, Lovell, Haise.

Rodina
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 05-01-2005 09:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rodina   Click Here to Email Rodina     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There was once a million dollar question on the US version where the question was "What kind of club did Alan Shepard use when he hit a golf ball on the moon?"
  1. Putter
  2. Sand Wedge
  3. 6 Iron
  4. 7 Iron
That lady also took the 0.5M; as would have I, since I didn't know between C and D.

Spacepsycho
Member

Posts: 711
From: Huntington Beach, Calif.
Registered: Aug 2004

posted 05-01-2005 11:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacepsycho   Click Here to Email Spacepsycho     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
6 Iron.

cfreeze79
Member

Posts: 300
From: Martinez, CA, USA
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 05-01-2005 11:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cfreeze79   Click Here to Email cfreeze79     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On the golf club, I would have used my "Phone-A-Friend" to, of course... Neil Armstrong!

Okay, I've never met the guy, but it would definitely be a hoot!

Moonwalker1954
Member

Posts: 236
From: Montreal, Canada
Registered: Jul 2004

posted 05-02-2005 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moonwalker1954   Click Here to Email Moonwalker1954     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For that Phone-A-Friend option, I would have called Ed Mitchell... he was right there beside Al!

But, of course, I knew the answer!!

spacecraft films
Member

Posts: 802
From: Columbus, OH USA
Registered: Jun 2002

posted 10-05-2005 06:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tonight's Jeopardy, category: "Record Setters":
In August 1961 Gherman Titov did this 17 times. The previous record was one.
I was pleased to see that at least one of the contestants got it. The other two answers were: "?" and "swam the English Channel."

17 times?

Anyway. Anyone have an ultimate Space Exploration Final Jeopardy question?

Editor's note: Threads merged

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-05-2005 07:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Gives a whole new meaning to "The mission is in jeopardy!"

(Sorry, I watched "Airplane" too many times as a kid...)

cfreeze79
Member

Posts: 300
From: Martinez, CA, USA
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 10-05-2005 07:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cfreeze79   Click Here to Email cfreeze79     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I remember the final answer once was: "He was the first civilian to set foot on the moon."

Again, only one got it right.

sfurtaw
Member

Posts: 94
From: Saginaw, MI USA
Registered: Feb 2004

posted 10-06-2005 06:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for sfurtaw   Click Here to Email sfurtaw     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I remember one from the "Tournament of Champions" back in 1991. Final Jeopardy category was Space Exploration, and the clue was worded something like "These two spacecraft flew after Charlie Brown and Snoopy." No one got the answer right (Columbia and Eagle), and boy, did I feel smart (as a high school senior)!

heng44
Member

Posts: 2592
From: Netherlands
Registered: Nov 2001

posted 10-06-2005 07:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A nice question would be: "Who was John Houbolt?".

Larry McGlynn
Member

Posts: 806
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 10-06-2005 03:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The question would, more correctly, be phrased as follows.

"Name the originator of the Lunar Orbital Rendezvous concept that successfully landed men on the Moon."

WAWalsh
Member

Posts: 791
From: Cortlandt Manor, NY
Registered: May 2000

posted 10-06-2005 09:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for WAWalsh   Click Here to Email WAWalsh     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A number of years ago, I believe, there was a Final Jeopardy question of: "Only astronaut to fly a Mercury, Gemini and Apollo mission?"

Happy Proud Thrilled
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 10-06-2005 11:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Happy Proud Thrilled   Click Here to Email Happy Proud Thrilled     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I liked this past years Tournament of Champions, featuring Ken Jennings, and the Final Jeopardy was:
20th Century Americans
The last names of two Mercury astronauts who orbited the earth in 62 and 63 are also names of occupations.
(Cooper and Carpenter)

Again, only one got it right... and it wasn't Ken Jennings!

I'll never forget that moment! The entire tournament I felt like such an idiot, only to be redeemed by knowing in a heartbeat the final jeopardy answer. Sadly, the only one I had to gloat to was my 9 month old son, so my moment of glory was short-lived.

What that show needs to do is REALLY stump the players by having an entire category on the subject. I'm sure there would be a good amount of awkward silences and stares!

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1506
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 10-07-2005 06:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I remember a Jeopardy trick space question once.

"Who was the last American to fly in space alone?"

Actually you'd jump for Gordon Cooper when it was obviously Ron Evans.

Spacepsycho
Member

Posts: 711
From: Huntington Beach, Calif.
Registered: Aug 2004

posted 10-07-2005 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacepsycho   Click Here to Email Spacepsycho     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hate to throw a monkey wrench into the works, but I think the last American to fly in space alone was Dr. Joe Allen, when he flew the last MMU flight on STS-51A.

If you're not going to split hairs about flying the entire mission alone i.e.: Gordo Cooper, who was the last American to launch and land alone, then the last MMU flight on STS-51A should be considered the last time an American flew in space alone.

Not to take anything away from Ron Evans, but if your crewmates are on the moon or in the shuttle, you're still alone out there in the MMU.

Aztecdoug
Member

Posts: 1334
From: Huntington Beach
Registered: Feb 2000

posted 10-07-2005 11:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aztecdoug   Click Here to Email Aztecdoug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Brian Binnie would have been the last man to fly in space alone.... American or otherwise.

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1506
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 10-07-2005 01:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's your monkey wrench back....

At the time of the Jeopardy show, Ron Evans was the answer. There was no Brian Binney or Joe Allen exploits.

Jeopardy has been on the air for a long time, not just since July. I should have mentioned the time frame when I said "obviously".

Spacepsycho
Member

Posts: 711
From: Huntington Beach, Calif.
Registered: Aug 2004

posted 10-07-2005 07:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spacepsycho   Click Here to Email Spacepsycho     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've got to give you back the wrench, cause the last flight of the MMU was in August 1984, so I'm thinking that unless you're referring to a 22 year old Jeopardy show, the MMUs win it.

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1506
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 10-07-2005 07:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wrench back in your court.

The winning answer on this particular show was Ron Evans. I saw the show. I guessed Gordon Cooper and was wrong. So I guess it must have been prior to 1984. It was a long time ago when I saw it, but I certainly didn't commit the date to memory and I'm certainly not going to sit here and keep playing is so is not over it.

I'm starting to regret mentioning it.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27789
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-07-2005 08:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not to nitpick a trivial point even further, but if every time an astronaut or cosmonaut untethers from their spacecraft while on EVA the person is considered to be flying alone than Joe Allen was far from the last (even before SpaceShipOne). Though 'make then break' is the general rule aboard American missions, I believe there have been times, out of necessity, that 'break then make" became the order of tethering. I'll need to research to find a specific example.

The point being is that Joe Allen cannot be described as flying alone in space. Tether or no tether, he was part of a five person crew all flying in space at the same time.

On the other hand, Ron Evans was the only person in space while his two crewmates were on the lunar surface.

So even after 1984, I would suggest the correct answer would be Evans.

spacecraft films
Member

Posts: 802
From: Columbus, OH USA
Registered: Jun 2002

posted 10-07-2005 09:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, here's yet another example of a thread you start going off in a direction you never expect.

Don't know how to differentiate, but do think there is a difference between EVA activities and orbiting the moon alone while the rest of the crew, in another spacecraft, is down on the surface.

I'd have to go with the judges, even today, and say that Ron Evans was the last to fly alone in space.

When I was doing the Apollo 17 set, I regretted not having met Evans. He said something during the trans-Earth EVA that was so endearing to me. He was out on the EVA and talking to Mission Control and they were talking back and he said "Hey... on EVA aren't you supposed to call me by my name? Houston... this is Ron."

It was just a moment that he seemed so proud of... and I felt it along with him. Drifting out in the black of space between the Earth and Moon and "Houston, this is Ron." THAT is humanity reaching to the stars.

FFrench
Member

Posts: 3093
From: San Diego
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 10-07-2005 10:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Though 'make then break' is the general rule aboard American missions, I believe there have been times, out of necessity, that 'break then make" became the order of tethering.
There are also deliberate examples, such as Mark Lee testing SAFER here in 1994.

ejectr
Member

Posts: 1506
From: Brimfield, MA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 10-08-2005 07:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ejectr   Click Here to Email ejectr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Can you imagine that experience of Ron Evans, Mark?

You look one way and there is this huge, solid sphere which is the moon and looking the other way there is another big, solid sphere which is the earth. Then there is little spaceship Ron Evans out in the void between them.

Awesome! What an experience.

Ben
Member

Posts: 1852
From: Daytona Beach, FL
Registered: May 2000

posted 10-08-2005 03:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There was a final Jeopardy question earlier this year:

"This colorful term is used to describe whether objects in space are moving away from us."

I do not remember the category given or whether they used the terms 'objects in space' or in general (doesn't matter).

One of the three got it right. Two guessed blue, one guessed red (red shift is the answer).

My initial response was that it was dumb. Most people have heard of red-shift/blue-shift, but how many know which is which?

In the end, I didn't know what to think of it. After all, there are plenty who know it and plenty who don't. So I can see where your response came from. I guess you have to say to yourself, 'okay, I don't know that, but does it mean that in general most people don't or was this question just as typical of any of their questions?'

I wonder if Jeopardy forms it questions based on surveys or just from their committee's judgement.

John K. Rochester
Member

Posts: 1274
From: Rochester, NY, USA
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 10-08-2005 06:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for John K. Rochester   Click Here to Email John K. Rochester     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was watching an old Jeopardy episode today on the Game Show channel and an answer in the category "American Exploits" was: "in 1963 Gordon Cooper was the last American to do this alone"... only 1 person "got it" and his question was "what is go into space". They didn't say when the episode originally aired.

spaceflori
Member

Posts: 1380
From: Germany
Registered: May 2000

posted 03-06-2007 01:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The one million Euro (approx. $1.3 million) question on the German version of the famous show "Millionaire" yesterday was:
Who was the last man on the moon?

A. Frank Borman
B. Alan Shepard
C. Michael Collins
D. Eugene Cernan

Damn... another million gone easily.

Editor's note: Threads merged

1202 Alarm
Member

Posts: 277
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: Nov 2003

posted 03-06-2007 03:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 1202 Alarm     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And what did the guy say? I suppose he gave up and took the 300k then?

spaceflori
Member

Posts: 1380
From: Germany
Registered: May 2000

posted 03-06-2007 04:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflori   Click Here to Email spaceflori     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep, he gave up!

cddfspace
Member

Posts: 600
From: Morris County, NJ, USA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 03-06-2007 08:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cddfspace   Click Here to Email cddfspace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I saw a 1 vs 100 episode where the question was:
Which of these is still in orbit:

Hubble Space Telescope
Skylab
Mir Space Station

The contestant went through two "helps" before agreeing to go with the majority of the "mob". The "mob" was wrong - over half of them got it wrong. I think only 16 of about 45 or so actually got it right... broke my heart!

Rob Joyner
Member

Posts: 1296
From: GA, USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 03-06-2007 08:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rob Joyner   Click Here to Email Rob Joyner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This reminds me of a $500,000 question from a Millionaire episode.

"Who is the only astronaut to have flown aboard a Mercury, a Gemini and an Apollo mission?"

The contestant didn't know his Wally facts, took the 1/4 million and went home. I had never wanted to be in the 'hotseat' so bad!

spaced out
Member

Posts: 2616
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 03-06-2007 12:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There was a Millionaire question about was what orbits around the Earth - the Moon, the sun, Mars or Venus?

The guy hesitates for ages (but thinks it's the Sun) then asks the audience.

56% of them say the sun orbits around the Earth
42% say the Moon
2% say Mars

The guy goes with the sun...

He doesn't win a million Euros, but then the question was only for 3000 Euros.

Philip
Member

Posts: 4839
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 03-06-2007 01:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's what You get after media comments such as: The New Horizons fly by of Jupiter was made to study the volcanoes on the planet (because the animation showed the volcanoes on the moon Io).

randy
Member

Posts: 1320
From: West Jordan, Utah USA
Registered: Dec 1999

posted 03-06-2007 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for randy   Click Here to Email randy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is it any wonder, then, that we have to keep the fire lit?


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement