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Author Topic:   Embedding Star Trek in space history
Paul Littler
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posted 01-18-2004 12:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Littler   Click Here to Email Paul Littler     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Star Trek series Enterprise has some vintage footage in the opening credits.

One very brief shot always makes me smile. It's just after a shot of a Saturn V launch and shows three astronauts in the cabin being shaken around at launch. I think it is John Young nearest the camera who seems to be having a great time. In the middle seat, the astronaut has his chin on his chest and you can only see his eyes. He does not look as comfortable as Young. It is all over before I clock the third crewman.

Can someone with either better eyesight, a better slow motion VCR or with indepth knowledge of who sat where on each mission tell me who is who and which mission it is. Thanks. Did the mission commander sit in the left seat? Apollo 16?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-18-2004 01:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If this is the sequence you are referring to:

Then it is identified as a shot from within the space shuttle: "This view represents the mid-deck of a Space Shuttle, showing astronauts experiencing the exhilaration and intense g-forces of liftoff."

Here's the page that describes the sequence, as well as provides a video of the entire opening.

Incidentally, this shot appears to be a fake:

The real Enterprise, had/has its name on the front of the payload bay doors.

Rick Boos
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posted 01-18-2004 01:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Boos   Click Here to Email Rick Boos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think that is the photo he was talking about. As for Apollo, I think the only cockpit shots of the crew taken durring launch was on ASTP.

danatbird
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posted 01-18-2004 02:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for danatbird   Click Here to Email danatbird     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We had this discussion on a mailing list back when Enterprise first aired. Most of us agreed that it *does* look like John Young - but the astronaut was later identified as Steve Robinson. The video was taken during STS-95.

If you watch the entire video, you can see the difference.

Paul Littler
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posted 01-18-2004 02:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Paul Littler   Click Here to Email Paul Littler     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you all for the information and the links. That is indeed the shot and I was certain it had to be John Young!

Incorrectly assuming it was John Young threw me because I assumed he would be on the flight deck in the shuttle and it did not look like the flight deck! But as you must realise I was rather confused. I wondered where the "snoopy" headsets were if it was an Apollo launch. In the freeze frame the suits look orange but I would never have believed it was not John Young and if anyone deserved to be in the opening credits he does. So I HAD to ask.

FFrench
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posted 01-18-2004 06:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If I remember correctly (I can't stand the atrocious title music so have to leave the room for most of the opening!) Alan Shepard is also shown suiting up for Apollo 14, plus Yeager is shown too.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 01-19-2004 01:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
The real Enterprise, had/has its name on the front of the payload bay doors.
Right you are on that one. I believe they just computerized changed it so that the name appeared forward of the door, matching the other shuttles. Initially I thought it was a Vandenberg rollout, or even a Dulles rollout (rather than Palmdale in 1977) but the only markings changed on Enterprise were on the wings.

Two incidentals: in Sisko's office there's a model of the ISS. Okuda and company changed the name of the shuttle that's docked to it to "Enterprise"...

And in the first edition of the Star Trek Chronology, Gagarin's flight is listed as 1959. Three guesses as to who got them to correct it to 1961...

mikepf
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posted 01-19-2004 11:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikepf   Click Here to Email mikepf     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Within the the next few years it looks like we may have a chance to right a great wrong that has been bothering me for years. A devoted Star Trek fan from the very first episode, I can still recall with great frustration the publicity campaign to name the first shuttle Enterprise. I sincerely wanted one of the shuttles to be named after the greatest fictional starship of them all, but wanted it to be one that would actually go into space! I couldn't believe that true Star Trek fans could possibly want the name Enterprise for the only earthbound shuttle. Anyone out there remember taking part in the naming campaign? I'd sure love an explanation from your point of view. Perhaps we can do it right this time and get one of the new space-bound ships to carry on the tradition of having a ship named Enterprise boldly go, this time at least, into orbit!

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 01-20-2004 12:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wasn't part of the campaign but I can clear up a misconception.

Enterprise was originally intended for spaceflight - after KSC fit-checks on the launch pad, it was going to be returned to Palmdale for orbital modifications, and be the second shuttle to fly. Hence why it has an OV (Orbital Vehicle) designation, 101. (Even as late as 1980 NASA was still saying "Enterprise, the first orbiter, may not be converted from its ALT configuration.")

However, there were several modifications made between the building of Enterprise and Columbia, most notably in the materials used in the aft end, where the engines would be installed, and there were differences in the loads that could be imparted on Enterprise (Enterprise was placarded to a certain limit, instructing the pilots not to exceed that load, while Columbia was upgraded and certified.) Remember also that Enterprise had simulated orbital items, such as much of the heat shield tiles, or lacked orbital items such as a star tracker.

All this meant that it was cheaper to refit Challenger from its STA (Structual Test Article) designation to an OV, even though it meant literally taking apart Challenger and installing such items like a spaceworthy crew module.

Not to fear, for Enterprise did make it into space - several components from Enterprise were taken out and reused on spaceworthy orbiters (most likely Columbia, possibly also Challenger.) What I wouldn't give for one item - even a bolt - with unimpeachable provenance showing that it had been installed on Enterprise and later flown in space on another orbiter...

KenDavis
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posted 01-20-2004 02:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KenDavis   Click Here to Email KenDavis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The other difference between Enterprise and the other shuttles is that Enterprise did not have black thermal tiles extending as high over the front of the nose as the others i.e. the one in the shot. Can't believe I didn't notice this until reading this thread.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 01-20-2004 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you look at shots of Enterprise on the MLP at Vandenberg, you'll notice that they painted Enterprise to resemble the production orbiters - but they painted the nose wrong, unless the dummy nose RCS unit they used had different markings.

I believe also that Enterprise had different tiles (simulated or otherwise) applied on her vertical tail. That is, to the best of my recollection, the left and right sides of her tail were not mirror images of each other on at least one photo I've seen.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-18-2008 07:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The teaser trailer for J.J. Abrams' theatrical prequel/re-imagining of Star Trek is online 'unofficially' on YouTube (it officially debuts in theaters today attached to Abrams' Cloverfield and is expected to be posted on Monday to Paramount's website):

In the same spirit as the opening credits for Enterprise, the teaser places this version of Star Trek in the same canon as real space history with audio clips by President Kennedy, Scott Carpenter and Neil Armstrong.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-11-2008 04:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Diamond Sky Productions Media release
Lead Planetary Scientist Carolyn Porco to Advise on New Star Trek Movie

The woman who guides the team of scientists and engineers responsible for all those out-of-this-world images from Saturn that are popping up everywhere lately will soon be guiding the folks at Paramount Pictures in creating planetary scenes for its much anticipated new movie "Star Trek".

Carolyn Porco, the leader of the Imaging Science team on NASA'S Cassini mission at Saturn, has accepted an invitation from Star Trek director/producer, J.J. Abrams, to join the Star Trek production crew as a consultant on planetary science and imagery.

Abrams, who co-created, produced, and directed the TV series "Lost", created, produced and directed the TV series "Alias", and directed the film "Mission: Impossible III", was present at the 2007 TED conference in Monterey, California where Porco spoke of the recent findings from the Cassini mission.

"Carolyn and her team have produced images that are simply stunning", said Abrams. "I'm thrilled that she will help guide our production in creating an authentic vision of space, one that immerses our audience in a visual experience as awe-inspiring as what Carolyn's cameras have captured."

Porco also directs the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado. CICLOPS is the center of uplink and downlink flight operations for the Cassini imaging experiment, and the place where Cassini images are processed for release to the public. (Cassini images of Saturn and its rings and moons can be found at the official imaging team website.)

Porco has made it her personal mission to produce, and release for public consumption, images that are scientifically accurate, artfully presented and as true to life as possible.

"Ever since we departed Earth 10 years ago", said Porco, "I wanted the world to see and enjoy what the planetary bodies and phenomena imaged by our cameras would look like if one were there, going along for the ride."

Now she will be taking that same attention to scientific accuracy and artful presentation to the silver screen.

"This is a fabulous opportunity to bring to a wider audience the discoveries we've made at Saturn, and the spectacular sights we have seen there", she said. "And what better way to do that than to make use of those discoveries in the crafting of imagery for one of the most popular movie franchises of all time."

Porco will be working directly with Roger Guyett, the film's supervisor for visual effects. Guyett has been a creative leader at George Lucas' visual effects firm, Industrial Light and Magic, since 1994, and has been visual effects director for such classics as "Star Wars: Episode III", "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban", "Mission: Impossible III", "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End", and more.

"Everybody is very excited about Carolyn's involvement in the film", said Guyett. "Her incredible knowledge and expertise is obviously something we're going to tap into. And the breathtaking imagery that she brings to the collaboration will inspire us all to create some awesome images for our movie!"

The original 1966-1969 television series "Star Trek" was created by Gene Roddenberry, and has encompassed 726 total episodes for television in six different series. The first 10 "Star Trek" films have grossed in excess of $1 billion at the worldwide box office.

"Star Trek" is scheduled for release in December 2008.

Porco, a frequent commentator on science, astronomy, and space exploration for television, radio, and print media, is not new to film production. She served as a consultant on the Warner Bros. movie "Contact" starring Jodie Foster, and as scientific advisor and an animation director for the A&E television special on the 25th anniversary of the Voyager mission, "Cosmic Journey", produced by Cosmos Studios and Norman Star Media.

Alongside a distinguished teaching and research career, Porco played a prominent role in the Voyager mission to the outer planets in the 1980s, and is also an imaging scientist on NASA's New Horizons mission, currently on its way to Pluto.

Her contributions to the exploration of the outer solar system were recognized in 1998 with the naming of Asteroid (7231) Porco. In late 1999, she was selected by the London Sunday Times as one of 18 scientific leaders of the 21st century.

Porco is also the recipient of the 2008 Isaac Asimov Science Award given by the American Humanist Association, the oldest and largest humanist organization in the United States.

Diamond Sky Productions, LLC is a company devoted to the scientific, as well as artful, use of planetary imagery and computer graphics, across all visual media, for the presentation of science and its findings to the public.

Rick Mulheirn
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posted 11-11-2012 04:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A friend sent me this very interesting link this evening. It would appear Neil Armstrong was a bit of a "Trekkie."

The clip shows a levity and humour that was well known to his close friends but rarely seen if at all publicly.

Neil clearly enjoyed the event judging by the twinkle in his eye.

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