Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Mercury - Gemini - Apollo
  Apollo CM crew egress after splashdown (Page 2)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Apollo CM crew egress after splashdown
David C
Member

Posts: 150
From: Pasadena
Registered: Apr 2012

posted 01-16-2014 01:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Davis:
I assume that Apollo 7 took the longest time to go from Stable I to Stable II in part because they were the first to test the procedure.

According to Walt Cunningham it was because the were waiting for the CM to cool off before inflating bags that could contact the heatshield. Surprised me to hear that. I guess there was a little extra caution on the first flight.

David C
Member

Posts: 150
From: Pasadena
Registered: Apr 2012

posted 01-16-2014 01:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Obviousman:
An all-Navy crew should have done it by protocol: most senior is last on, first out. (TIC)
Your logic applies to a ship alongside under Navy orders. None of that applied in this case.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-16-2014 03:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The three CM uprighting bags were inflated nine minutes after splashdown, according to the Apollo 7 timeline. It then took four minutes to upright the spacecraft.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-16-2014 10:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Peter downunder:
...did the CMP fly the spacecraft during re-entry from the left seat on all Apollo missions?
Here is another thread that discusses who sat where in the CM.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-24-2014 10:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This incident occurred during the first Skylab splashdown:
Recovery Helicopter Struck by Drogue Parachute Reefing Line

The recovery helicopters entered the fall out pattern of the debris resulting from the command module entry before all debris had reached the ocean surface. A 3 meter section of drogue parachute reefing line impacted the main rotor blade of one of the helicopters and was found draped over a landing gear strut when the helicopter returned to the aircraft carrier.

An impact time analysis has been performed for all debris generated during reentry. The following table shows the latest time of landing for all debris which is still in the air after command module landing.

As a result of the analysis, recovery procedures are being modified to prevent helicopter entry into the debris fall out pattern until all pieces which could damage the helicopters have impacted the water.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-28-2014 08:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are there any stable II photos of Apollo 11?

cmj1964
New Member

Posts: 2
From: Broomfield, Colorado, USA
Registered: Mar 2013

posted 01-28-2014 08:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cmj1964   Click Here to Email cmj1964     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The 290 lbs of seawater trapped in the tunnel would also contribute to the longer uprighting time of the Apollo 7 CM. The Apollo 7 CM had a two hatch configuration in the forward tunnel, and the mission report addresses post-splashdown seawater leakage through a vent valve in the upper tunnel hatch (ref: paragraphs 5.19.6 and 11.23). Subsequent CM's had a single unified tunnel hatch, which did not have the suspect valve.

cmj1964
New Member

Posts: 2
From: Broomfield, Colorado, USA
Registered: Mar 2013

posted 01-28-2014 09:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cmj1964   Click Here to Email cmj1964     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Figure 11G on page 114 in Bob Fish's excellent book, "Hornet Plus Three", is a USN photo of Apollo 11 in Stable II.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-28-2014 10:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I found this stable II photo on the KSC website.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1064
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 02-04-2014 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Are the Skylab splashdown locations shown on this map correct?

The map indicates that Skylab 4 splashed down somewhere north of Hawaii. However, the photo caption for S74-17133 says that Skylab 4 splashed down 176 miles southwest of San Diego. Hawaii is about 2500 miles from San Diego.

Which one is correct?

moorouge
Member

Posts: 1732
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 02-04-2014 10:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The photo has the correct location.

moorouge
Member

Posts: 1732
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 04-03-2014 08:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cmj1964:
The 290 lbs of seawater trapped in the tunnel would also contribute to the longer uprighting time of the Apollo 7 CM.

Actually there was approximately 400lbs of water in the tunnel. Of more concern was the fact that if one of the uprighting bags had failed the capsule would have been unable to return to Stable 1.

On edit - the previous figure of 290lbs of water in the tunnel is probably closer to the actual amount. My quoted figure, though in a NASA technical report, is likely to be from memory. The 290lbs is from the '7' mission report.


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement