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  Apollo 1 spacesuits and spacecraft after the fire (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   Apollo 1 spacesuits and spacecraft after the fire
User997
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posted 10-25-2005 01:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for User997     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone know what ever became of the Apollo 1 spacesuits after the fire?

This is one thing, of all my years of reading and studying, I have never heard anything about.

Rick Boos
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posted 10-25-2005 07:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Boos   Click Here to Email Rick Boos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Apollo 1 spacesuits are still stored in the sealed storage facility at Langley. They are individually placed in green "Army" type canvas bags, then individually placed in their own wooden crate.

The suits are in "poor" condition thanks to NASA. They were never hermetically sealed like the interior spacecraft components were. Dr. Berry's reports were also ruined by high atmospheric moisture. This was the result of NASA shutting off the nitrogen purge after the ten year mandate ended. Interesting note... the viles of blood that were removed from the crew members were placed in plastic bags and are okay.

There is still remnants of the spacesuits in the form of white powdered flakes on the spacecraft floor below the hatch.

I attempted to discuss with NASA a method of drying the suits out by using a centrifuge, but they were not interested and told me to mind my own business. Another side of NASA.

Same goes with the photographs and black channel tapes that were eventually retrieved by the National Archives. Needless to say they were just as upset with NASA as I was. These records and items need to be preserved for history.

nelyubov
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posted 10-25-2005 11:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for nelyubov   Click Here to Email nelyubov     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have seen a photo of at least one Apollo 1 training suit that I believe belonged to Gus Grissom. Does anyone know where this one is on display?

Aztecdoug
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posted 10-25-2005 11:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Aztecdoug   Click Here to Email Aztecdoug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I believe I saw it on display at Liberty Park in NJ with Liberty Bell 7 back in the Spring of 2001. I assumed it was traveling with Liberty Bell 7.

sts205cdr
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posted 10-25-2005 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for sts205cdr   Click Here to Email sts205cdr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There are Apollo 1 training suits on display at the Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville.

User997
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posted 10-25-2005 01:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for User997     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's a real shame to hear that the spacesuits (and artifacts) have been taken so poorly care of. I was hoping that the Smithsonian, or some professional organization had control of them and were preserving them for history's sake.

The viles of blood, are they also in the storage down at Langley? And what was the purpose of keeping this blood?

And I heard a couple months ago that the Langley storage had being cleaned out, and everything shipped down to the Cape to be stored with the Challenger debris in the LC34 silos? Anyone know for sure?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-25-2005 02:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The move to the Florida silos has long been rumored, and may even have been considered (depending on who you talk to at NASA it has various degrees of validity) but never happened. CM 012 is still at Langley.

The Smithsonian - and for that matter certain divisions within NASA - have tried to have the capsule moved and/or restored (to its post-fire but pre-deconstruction condition) over the years but have run into various objections (including by one of the Apollo 1 families). There has been renewed interest since the loss of Columbia by several parties to exhibit part or whole of the command module but as with most things in life the most limiting factor has been the lack of funds. As I have heard it explained, once several projects already underway are finished, the discussion may pick up again with serious intentions.

spacecraft films
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posted 10-25-2005 02:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacecraft films   Click Here to Email spacecraft films     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I do happen to know that the black channel recordings are at the archives. I also happen to know that a copy of them is sitting in an area open to access at the archives.

I don't know if that was intended, but it's there.

Most of these copies of the recordings end just before the accident. At least one of them does not.

I've heard it has been released in its entirety before, but I had never heard it all before. And before I'm asked, no, Spacecraft Films won't be releasing it in its entirety when we do Apollo 1. We will use up to the accident and immediately after...

Duke Of URL
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posted 10-25-2005 02:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Duke Of URL   Click Here to Email Duke Of URL     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've seen the suit photos and, hideously, it looks like Ed White and Gus Grissom are still in them.

dtemple
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posted 10-25-2005 03:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dtemple   Click Here to Email dtemple     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have long thought the Apollo 1 spacecraft should be on display but have run up against a few who believed the idea was somehow ghoulish. Comparing the display of Apollo 1 with that of the USS Arizona doesn't seem to change the minds who don't believe s/c 012 should be on display.

What I have read suggests displaying the outer shell only. I believe the entire spacecraft should be reassembled with the hatch on or off. In fact, if the service module still exists (the NASM doesn't know what happened to it), the entire CSM of Apollo 1 should be put on display in my opinion.

By the way, Stephen Clemmons if you are reading this please explain what "scrapped" means in regard to CM 014, the spacecraft dismantled during the Apollo 1 fire investigation. What I was told is that some of 014's parts were used as spares for the simulators, but most of the CM was scrapped. Does that mean the inner and outer shells were crushed like a junk automobile and sent to a smelter? My guess is that no one would want the outer shell for scrap since all the ablator would have to be removed - a seemingly expensive procedure compared to the value of the metal. My speculation is that CM 014 may have simply been buried in an abandoned missile silo. Any thoughts or knowledge on this matter?

User997
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posted 10-25-2005 06:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for User997     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apollo 1 spacesuits post-fire: Look towards the bottom of the page for the photos.

Rick Boos
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posted 10-25-2005 07:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Boos   Click Here to Email Rick Boos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The viles of blood that I refered to were from the autopsies. They were placed in a plastic hermetically sealed bags and well marked. One vile had dried up on Grissom's if memory serves me correctly - I would have to check my photos and video tapes. The blood samples were placed within the wood suit crate, as were Dr. Berry's reports and findings. Sadly the black notebooks fell apart from being so wet, as they were not sealed in plastic.

As for the black channel tapes, you are correct. They are now in the archives, but they were originally stored in the sealed storage facility, as were all of the photos and findings. Years later they were retrieved, but the photos were heavily damaged. The black channel tapes of the fire itself will NEVER be released to anyone including the immediate families - thanks to Betty Grissom. Long story that I do not want to discuss with the public.

As for the spacecraft and related components being shipped to the Cape and buried in the silos, this was attempted once (and blocked). NASA was forced to ship everything back to Langley.

As for tastefully displaying Apollo 1, it won't happen anytime soon as the three families are in disagreement on that issue. Back in 1996, we gained permission from Dan Golden for its' release, but friction between the concerned parties has prevented its' release.

John Charles
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posted 10-25-2005 08:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for John Charles     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Aztecdoug:
I believe I saw it on display at Liberty Park in NJ with Liberty Bell 7 back in the Spring of 2001. I assumed it was traveling with Liberty Bell 7.
I saw that same suit with the travelling Liberty Bell exhibit. According to a label visible in the "collar" of the suit, it is actually an early Gemini suit, G2C-type, decorated to look like an Apollo 1 suit. If I remember correctly, it even has a post-fire Beta cloth US flag on the left shoulder--but the Apollo 1 suits actually had a non-fire proof flag on the right shoulder.

User997
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posted 10-25-2005 08:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for User997     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Forgive my ignorance here, but what exactly were, and what was contained, on these black channel tapes that everyone keeps referencing here?

carmelo
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posted 10-26-2005 08:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for carmelo   Click Here to Email carmelo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by John Charles:
I saw that same suit with the travelling Liberty Bell exhibit.

User997
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posted 10-26-2005 11:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for User997     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The suit on display has the US flag on the opposite sleeve then the one that Gus Grissom was wearing. And besides the name plate on the one on display being bigger, they look very similar.

Any idea why they discontinued the use of the "Block 1" helmet after Apollo 1? I recall that none of the other crews ever wore them after the fire.

Matt T
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posted 10-26-2005 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Matt T   Click Here to Email Matt T     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not just the helmet, the whole suit.

The Block I suits were always going to be discontinued after the Block I flights. With the hiatus in manned flights after Apollo 1 there were no manned Block I missions.

John K. Rochester
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posted 10-27-2005 08:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for John K. Rochester   Click Here to Email John K. Rochester     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In all these years, I've never seen pictures of the post-fire suits. Unbelievable, just terrible.

spaceman1953
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posted 10-27-2005 08:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceman1953   Click Here to Email spaceman1953     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ditto that on the suits... have never seen these pics. Wished now I still hadn't. So be warned, if you haven't clicked on that link yet. Sorry.

Brock
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posted 10-28-2005 08:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Brock   Click Here to Email Brock     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is a topic like many of you that has been of interest to me. I remember in the Moonshot video that Stu Roosa who was in the LC-34 blockhouse that night says that "their suits were still white" or something to that effect. The pictures of the post fire suits don't look very white to me.

Now it is entirely possible since the suits melted and were glued or cemented to the CM metal that when the bodies were removed that caused additional damages to the suits.

Perhaps somoene can shed some light on what Roosa observed of the suit conditions on the evening of January 27, 1967.

Also of interest is that some speculate that the Block I suits were made of nomex and that if they had been wearing the Beta suits of Apollo 7 onwards that the suits would have been almost completely intact. Any thoughts?

Brock
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posted 10-28-2005 08:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Brock   Click Here to Email Brock     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the looks of the spacesuit conditions it doesn't look like there would be much to display. I think for the sake of history they need to be preserved but I don't think putting them in a museum just doesn't seem right to me. I think if they can faithfully reconstruct CM 12 then by all means that should be put on display. Sitting in a warehouse at Langley can't be good for it. Watching the NOVA program to the moon it looks like there are just boxloads of components of CM 12 sitting out in a manner where they look exposed to the elements.

nelyubov
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posted 10-28-2005 09:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for nelyubov   Click Here to Email nelyubov     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In response to the comment about Stu Roosa and the fact that "the suits were white". Roosa was speaking in general terms as his next sentence was "one did not see charred bodies". He meant that the suits were not completely destroyed and that the bodies were not incinerated as was originally reported in some newspapers at the time of the accident. Roosa was just saying that the bodies and suits were not completely destroyed.

carmelo
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posted 10-28-2005 10:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for carmelo   Click Here to Email carmelo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have read that in spring of 1967 were constructed Apollo Block-1 suits with beta cloth cover layers for Schirra's crew. They were used until when the news Apollo A6l suits arrived in late summer 1967. Is correct?

carmelo
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posted 10-28-2005 10:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for carmelo   Click Here to Email carmelo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apollo Block 1 suits with beta cloth cover layer for Schirra crews in spring of 1967 perhaps is this?

carmelo
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posted 10-28-2005 11:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for carmelo   Click Here to Email carmelo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In this photo dated early 1968, John Young, member of back crew of Apollo 7, is wearing an Apollo Block 1 suit (recognizable for the life vest attachment points on the breast) with Gemini helmet. Stafford and Cernan are wearing A6L suits. He is obvious that in until early 1968 the A6L suits had not been distributed enough.

Rick Boos
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posted 10-28-2005 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Boos   Click Here to Email Rick Boos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Parts of the spacesuits were still white in color, as seen in the posted photos, and that was probably what he was referring to. What is not shown in the photos is the extent of damage to the backside of Grissom's suit. The suits were (as shown) were in very poor condition.

As I said in my earlier post you can still see shredded white flakes of spacesuit material below the hatchway sill on the floor of the spacecraft upon the melted mattress pads. This is where the tangled bodies of Grissom and White were found... still reaching for the hatch and fused together to the floor of the spacecraft and fused to the mattress pad. As a matter of fact Ed White's handprint can clearly be seen permanently etched into the hatch.

This white spacesuit material can also be seen in the gutted interior cockpit shots right after the fire in the seat area.

Having been inside Apollo 1 I observed a number of interesting things. One thing in particular that caught my attention was the obvious pathway of the fire and the vast difference in temperature ranges, and extent of damage. In some places it was hot enough to melt stainless steel, and yet in other places blue velcro (Grissom's and Chaffee's side) was not damaged at all.

As for someday displaying Apollo 1 I really don't think it should be restored. It should be left as is for the sake of history and for future generations and possible analysis down the line in years to come when technology improves. If it is going to be on display it should be done tastefully with closed hatches and blacked out windows. The interior parts would not need to be installed.

One idea that we were kicking around was displaying it out at launch complex #34 directly below the opening of the launch pedestal below ground level in the equipment room. In other words as you walk under the launch pedestal dead center below you would be Apollo 1. The viewer would look through glass and observe the entire spacecraft from a top angle.

This would serve several purposes. First it would be displayed where the accident happened, secondly it would be out of reach of collectors with sticky fingers, and thirdly it would rid Langley of the burden while in reality it would still be stored, only at KSC. The interior components could be stored as they are now with the spacecraft in the equipment room, but out of sight from everyone.

Brock
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posted 10-28-2005 02:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Brock   Click Here to Email Brock     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wherever Apollo 1 is stored it deserves better than being in some nondescript warehouse facility. On my visit to LC-34 I was told that the blockhouse is empty inside and that all hardware and computers are gone. If that is so maybe they should house Apollo 1 in the blockhouse. I am sure that that as a two story structure it could accommodate CM 012. It could almost make the LC-34 blockhouse a museum.

I also think your idea of putting it on display under the launch pedestal is worthy of consideration but I think preserving it outdoors in the Florida climate would take its toll. I was shocked at the condition of LC-34. You look at the crew photos of Apollo 1 in front of the Service Structure, Gantry and blockhouse and the place looked like a beehive of activity back in the day. It was really hard for me to get an idea of where everything once stood as it would have for Apollo 1 and 7.

I think the same could be said for the conditions of LC-19 and LC-14 as well.

Rick, you talked about the crew autopsy being done near the pad (I think they called it the bioastronautics support unit). Is that the same building as the "infirmary" in the Cape industrial area that one passes on the Then and Now Tour?

Rick Boos
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posted 10-28-2005 03:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Boos   Click Here to Email Rick Boos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please read my post again. I mentioned under the launch pedestal "below ground level in the equipment room". There are equipment rooms under Pad #34 (as there are at pad #5 and some of the other pads) and it would not be exposed to the weather. A nitrogen purge system would be needed however (anywhere it was located for that matter) as was the case at Langley for the mandated 10 years.

As for the blockhouse most of them on ICBM row are now used for storage or office space.

dtemple
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posted 10-28-2005 05:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dtemple   Click Here to Email dtemple     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The idea of restoring CM 012 in my mind means restoring it to its immediate post-fire condition - in other words weld the forward and aft heatshields back together and finish the exterior surface so that the seam is completely hidden, but don't cover the exterior damage.

I don't agree that the inner pressure hull should be left out. At some point, something will have to be done with it anyway. If it is not included with the outer shell then eventually the pressure shell will be disposed of in some manner, thus it will be lost. As a historic artifact that doesn't seem right.

The USS Arizona is on display, so why not the complete Apollo 1 spacecraft?

Of course a full reconstruction of the Apollo 1 spacecraft would be more expensive. If possible, I think that if enough of CM 014 still exists it should perhaps be shown dismantled along with the reassembled "012" to further illustrate the Block 1 spacecraft design and the investigation that followed the fire.

Of course such a display would require even more money and more space. Clearly, the least expensive and most practical way to display Apollo 1 is as Rick suggested, though in my opinion it is not necessarily the best way.

divemaster
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posted 10-28-2005 05:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm sure that any Apollo 1 type suit questions could be directed to Walt Cunningham in e-mail. He's always been very forthcoming with answers about equipment [if he knows the answer].

There are so many photos of Walt in his Apollo 2 suit out there, and they appear to look the exact same as the Apollo 1 suits.

mjanovec
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posted 10-29-2005 01:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spaceman1953:
Ditto that on the suits...have never seen these pics.
It's probably just a trick of the light, but looking at the face shields of the Grissom and White suits, one can see an eerie pattern of light that looks very much like faces. Very disturbing...

heng44
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posted 10-30-2005 02:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for heng44   Click Here to Email heng44     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by carmelo:
Apollo Block 1 suits with beta cloth cover layer for Schirra crews in spring of 1967 perhaps is this?
That Donn Eisele photo was taken on December 29, 1966, during altitude chambers tests at KSC. It has an S67-prefix, but it was taken in the final days of 1966.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 11-03-2005 07:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Brock:
Is that the same building as the "infirmary" in the Cape industrial area that one passes on the Then and Now Tour?
Yes, the "infirmary" is the same dispensary that you're referring to at the Cape-side industrial area. Located on Hangar Road, the Bioastronautics Operation and Support Unit (BOSU) is at the south end of the dispensary facility.

This is the same building that the bodies of the Apollo 1 crew members were first transported to after the fire and examined, each in a separate unit. The medical facility is less than 2 miles from Pad 34 where the tragic fire took place. The white transport van that took the Apollo 1 crew to the pad test went right by the dispensary as it turned left on Hangar from NASA Causeway East, altogether about a 5-mile trip from KSC's crew quarters to the Saturn 1B launch complex.

Re: Apollo 1 spacecraft "post-fire" future, and/or, what should happen to it; I think Rick and many others know my position on this, however, to physically support any sort of public viewing of Spacecraft 012 at or even near LC-34 will poise many difficult and challenging concerns and problems, let alone, long-term money support. It would be nice, in my opinion, to get the first manned Apollo ship out of Langley's storage and... somehow... display the craft in the most delicate, tasteful, and appropriate means that could make everyone happy. But that may be an impossibility -- at this time -- as some family members would not approve any such action, and not to mention mixed reactions within NASA/NASM as well.

If the capsule was to be displayed in the future, like Rick, I don't think at all it should be restored, No, keep her as she was after the fire investigation and block out the windows.

It was even discussed years/decades ago about the possibility of placing Apollo 1 inside 34's blockhouse, under the pedestal at the pad, or somewhere nearby. But such possibilities, as mentioned before, are just not practical at the moment. I don't think the Apollo Command Module would even fit inside the main doors of the blockhouse (I'll have to recheck on that along with the service entry area of the control center), as I would hate to see it disassembled in pieces just to accomplish such a feat. More damage of such a move could be done to the aging spacecraft and the cost alone, in a number of ways, is just not feasible in my opinion.

Oh well, this debate will probably be going on always... hopefully someday there can be a better, respectful, and permanent "home" for America's first three-man spacecraft.

Fra Mauro
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posted 11-05-2005 12:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just looked at the photos of the suits. First, I am surprised that NASA let these slip out into the public domain. How long have these been available? Second, the pictures aren't as clear as I would have liked. Third, I am going to assume that some parts of the suits fell apart further as they were removed from the crew.

Stephen Clemmons
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posted 11-05-2005 02:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Stephen Clemmons   Click Here to Email Stephen Clemmons     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good posts. Lots of good questions.

Regarding the Apollo 1 Memorial, I have always felt that some kind of memorial should be placed on Pad 34, whether it be the remains of Apollo 1 or some other type of display. The idea of having the actual spacecraft in its dissembled configuration placed in the instrument room below the launch pad or even between the four pedestals legs still remaining on P-34, in a sealed container, as long as it was tastefully done, would be an excellent exhibit for future generations to see what our "moon" program cost us.

It's possible that the spacecraft could be reassembled only as a shell, with the heat shields installed and windows blacked out using volunteers in the area that worked on the craft or in the program.

Regarding CM 014 being scrapped, when Spacecraft 014 was brought to the PIB, it was used to develop removal procedures to disassemble Spacecraft 012. As each part was removed from 014, the engineers wrote the procedures so that each part of 012 was removed in proper sequence, listing removal torques for the bolts, screws, tubing "B" nuts and electrical connections.

This verified that each part of 012 was not damaged with the dis-assembly techniques.

When it was all over, spacecraft 014 was just a pile of parts, with the main shell intact. Many of these items were then used as spare parts on Spacecraft 017 and 020 (unmanned), or shipped back to Downy since there was nothing wrong with them and would not be needed in the future.

No one seems to know where the main hull of 014 went to, but it is possible that it was also shipped back to Downy, California, since it still belonged to NAA and had not been accepted by NASA. I don't believe that it would have been scrapped at KSC because of the materials involved.

I'm sure that it joined other hulks of previous craft used in previous testing and was scrapped there.

Regarding the suits, the pictures that have been published by NASA shows that the suits were heavily damaged, certainly not in the pristine white condition that was later described.

The condition of the suits could not be determined that night during the rescue attempts because of the short times that we were in the spacecraft. I'll have to accept the opinion of those that removed the bodies later as to what they found.

I think that when Cernan described what they found, it was to counteract a news release issued shortly after the fire from an unidentifiable source by a newspaper that said the astronauts had been completely burned up.

This could have come from the fact that Gus was under his seat and Ed had slipped off the center seat and was down in the open space between the seat and airframe where he had slumped over.

When we removed the inner hatch, it would only go so far as it was lodged against Ed's body. This blocked about half of the hatch opening, restricting our entry into the craft until we could get the hatch to finish falling.

To someone looking in, it would appear that both astronauts had been incinerated since their seats were empty.

The real condition of the astronauts was not known to the public until later that evening and even then, no details were given other than the three astronauts were killed in a fire on Pad 34.

Fra Mauro
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posted 06-05-2013 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did the doctors at the pad open the visors of the suits when they examined the crew?

MadSci
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posted 06-07-2013 04:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MadSci     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a distant memory of reading an account by someone involved in viewing the interior of the spacecraft after the fire and they remarking that a layer of white ash lay on top of the bodies. If so, this might account for any remarks that the spacesuits appeared 'white'.

ColinBurgess
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posted 06-07-2013 07:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ColinBurgess   Click Here to Email ColinBurgess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Although there's no mention of the white ash in his account, Dr. Fred Kelly gives a very graphic description of the aftermath of the accident in "We Have a Fire in the Cockpit," which forms the latter part of Duane Graveline's excellent book, "From Laika With Love." Dr. Kelly was one of the first on the scene, and he not only gives a full description of what he encountered at the pad, but a detailed analysis of the later medical findings.

BMacKinnon
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Posts: 136
From: Waterford, MI. USA
Registered: Jul 2007

posted 06-10-2013 03:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BMacKinnon   Click Here to Email BMacKinnon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Continuing on a line brought up in a previous post that referred to the Arizona Memorial in Hawaii, here in Dearborn, Michigan at the Henry Ford Museum, we have on display the chair (rocker) that President Lincoln was sitting in when he was assassinated and also the limousine that President Kennedy was riding in when he was shot. Both are from national tragedies but yet tastefully displayed.

The limo was reconfigured by the Secret Service before it was retired. The Lincoln chair has not been restored.

I feel that the Apollo 1 capsule (or what is left of it) could and should be tastefully displayed. Especially now while we still have people who were there that could be involved in helping to create the display.

Pad 34 might be a hard place to display it, with it being on the Cape Canaveral side, but maybe a location at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex near the Space Mirror could be possible site.

To display the capsule would help present and future generations be able to see and understand the sacrifices that were made with the Apollo 1 tragedy and what was learned to prevent it from happening again.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-10-2013 04:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Rather than splinter this subject, we have a thread dedicated to the topic of displaying Apollo 1 here.


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