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  Flown Patch, Pin and Flag Certificates

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Author Topic:   Flown Patch, Pin and Flag Certificates
Jim Behling
Member

Posts: 694
From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 09-10-2012 10:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have over 30 certificates or photos with either a flown patch, pin and flag from the missions that I have worked on. Most are in a archival portfolio with a few in picture frames due to size or they were given to me that way. All but 2 are personalized to me and the provenance for those two may be debatable to others (even though I know they were flown).

The question(s) are:

  • Would you keep them all?
  • If not, why not?
  • How would you culled the collection? (I suppose a list of the missions and flown item may help, which I am working on).

Spaceguy5
Member

Posts: 421
From: Pampa, TX, US
Registered: May 2011

posted 09-11-2012 01:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Spaceguy5   Click Here to Email Spaceguy5     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Personally, if they were mine--even having not worked on any missions--I would want to keep all of them. If I had anything from a mission which I had a personal connection to, I'd especially want to keep it.

I prize every flown item in my collection, despite having many redundant items and only one with a personal connection (it was awarded to my mom for work she did with STS-39).

Flown items might be less unique to people who've worked with the program or to serious collectors, although to the average person, seeing something that was flown in space is much more memorable.

That's why I also like keeping my items on display so that I can share them with people. I don't have room to display everything at once, although I do alternate what I have on my walls/shelves when I feel like it. I'm also loaning some of my items to a local museum, and considering loaning others to schools. I remember many years ago, one of the elementary schools I'd attended had a framed flag which was flown, and it certainly left a very good impression.

Another way I look at it is that when I'm much older, this stuff will likely be much more valuable. Meaning that if necessary, it could be a good investment to my kids or grand kids.

If I did have to cull my collection though, my criteria would be to firstly keep items I felt the most personal connection to, and secondly keep items from flights with important milestones. I'd also want to hold onto the most displayable pieces.

Jim Behling
Member

Posts: 694
From: Cape Canaveral, FL
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 09-11-2012 02:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim Behling   Click Here to Email Jim Behling     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is the list:
  • Shuttle/MIR flag (STS-91) with certificate
  • RRMD experiment patch (STS-84?) with certificate
  • USAF Master Space badge (STS 51-J) on plaque
  • 6555th ASTG Spacecraft Division pin (STS-28) on plaque
  • STS-27 patch with certificate
  • OASIS II experiment patch (STS-27) with certificate
  • OASIS experiment patch (STS-29) with certificate
  • STS-28 patch with landing photo
  • US Flag (STS-28) with certificate
  • STIC contract patch (STS-28) with certificate
  • STS-33 patch with launch photo
  • STS-36 patch with certificate
  • STS-38 patch with certificate
  • 6555th ASTG Spacecraft Division patch (STS-38) with certificate
  • US Flag (STS-39) with certificate
  • 6555th ASTG Spacecraft Division patch (STS-39) with certificate
  • STS-44 patch with certificate
  • STS-44 patch with certificate (different from above)
  • STS-53 mission and 6555th ASTG Spacecraft Division patch with certificate
  • US Flag (STS-53) with certificate
  • Spacehab Program Flag (STS-57) with certificate
  • STS-60 patch with certificate
  • STS-63 patch with certificate
  • STS-76 patch with certificate
  • STS-77 patch with certificate
  • STS-81 patch with certificate
  • STS-86 patch with certificate
  • STS-91 patch with certificate
  • STS-95 patch with certificate
  • Undocumented STS-96, 101 and 106 patches

rgarner
Member

Posts: 443
From: Liverpool, United Kingdom
Registered: Mar 2012

posted 09-11-2012 02:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for rgarner   Click Here to Email rgarner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Personally I would keep them. But I'm of the 'passing down to children/grandchildren' type of guy. I like the thought that in maybe 100 years my grandchildren will be telling stories about me to my great grandchildren and having such pieces there to show them. But thats me.

spaced out
Member

Posts: 2735
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 09-12-2012 01:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think it's easy as a collector to say keep them all but it's different for people who worked on the programs.

If you worked on something for a Shuttle mission the flown presentation is a memento of that work but it's just a souvenir. Someone who worked on a whole string of missions, as is typical, ends up with dozens of such presentations. Each job was 'special' of course, so each presentation is 'special', but they don't need to keep a particular presentation to remind themselves of having done that work.

Even the astronauts eventually reach a stage where they have passed on some items to kids, grandkids and friends, but don't feel they need to hang on to all the other items they kept from their missions. In the end the flown items are just souvenirs. Parting with them doesn't take away the memories of the actual flight.

If I was in Jim's situation I'd make sure there's a flown presentation for every child/grandchild, a couple of favourites for a wall somewhere in the house, then I don't see any problem with selling the others.

As for keeping Shuttle flown presentations for the future as an investment I'm not so sure. There are thousands upon thousands of these presentations out there. Right now the majority are in the collections of those they were awarded to but as the decades go by they will appear on eBay in ever greater numbers, starting with the earlier missions and moving on up through the years.

Gonzo
Member

Posts: 506
From: Lansing, MI, USA
Registered: Mar 2012

posted 09-12-2012 10:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gonzo   Click Here to Email Gonzo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well put, Chris.

I will add to this:

quote:
Originally posted by spaced out:
There are thousands upon thousands of these presentations out there. Right now the majority are in the collections of those they were awarded to but as the decades go by they will appear on eBay in ever greater numbers, starting with the earlier missions and moving on up through the years.

...that, by then, there will be even more of these "in the hands of the collections of those they were awarded to" as there will be many more future missions! Point being, the number of these presentations will never go down. Sure some of the "older" ones will become more valuable as time goes by due to rarity, but these presentations will always be out there. And in growing numbers.

fredtrav
Member

Posts: 1123
From: Birmingham AL USA
Registered: Aug 2010

posted 09-12-2012 10:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fredtrav   Click Here to Email fredtrav     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with Chris (spaced out) on the matter of appreciation in value of shuttle flown flags and patches and other items. If you look at lists of items flown on the shuttle, there are hundreds, if not thousands of flown flags and patches not to mention flown seals, pins, etc. on each shuttle mission.

With 133 returned missions there is a lot of material out there that can come on to the market. As the workers on the missions age and pass away, or those that were laid off need money, more shuttle flown items will start to show up on eBay and at other auction venues and lower prices may follow.

I believe the pool of collectors is shrinking and until we return to space in a meaningful and exciting way(a manned mission to Mars for example) it will continue to do so.

Keep the items that you have a connection to, a few extra to give to family, assuming they want them, friends etc then disperse the remainder however you see fit like selling them on eBay, or donate some to schools to display (though with the realization that after a few years they may end up on eBay anyway).

All times are CT (US)

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