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  4/03: NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Jim Lovell award ceremony (Maryland)

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Author Topic:   4/03: NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Jim Lovell award ceremony (Maryland)
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-31-2009 12:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
James Lovell Receives Ambassador of Exploration Award

NASA honored astronaut James "Jim" Lovell, Jr., with the presentation of an Ambassador of Exploration Award for his contributions to the U.S. space program. During a ceremony held Friday, April 3, Lovell accepted the award at the Patuxent River Naval Air Museum in Lexington Park, Md., and presented it to the museum for display.

NASA is giving the Ambassador of Exploration Award to the first generation of explorers in the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space programs for realizing America's goal of going to the moon. The award is a moon rock encased in Lucite, mounted for public display. The rock is part of the 842 pounds of lunar samples collected during six Apollo expeditions from 1969 to 1972.

Lovell was born in Cleveland and received his bachelor's degree from the United States Naval Academy in 1952. He spent four years as a test pilot at the Naval Air Test Center, now the Patuxent River Naval Air Station. Lovell was the pilot for the Gemini 7 mission and the command pilot for Gemini 12. He and fellow crewmen, Frank Borman and William A. Anders, became the first humans to leave the Earth's gravitational influence and travel to the moon during the Apollo 8 mission in 1968. On Lovell's fourth mission, he was the commander of Apollo 13.

Dave Clow
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Posts: 213
From: South Pasadena, CA 91030
Registered: Nov 2003

posted 04-06-2009 03:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dave Clow   Click Here to Email Dave Clow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm sure someone has already long since answered this, but I'm curious to know how these particular samples were chosen, and why they weren't considered primarily valuable for research purposes.

I've seen a couple of them and it's always a thrill.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27327
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-06-2009 03:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The samples, as I understand it, are from rocks that have already been extensively studied, such that there scientific value has been exhausted.

All times are CT (US)

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