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  SCRUB: Delta 4 heavy

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Author Topic:   SCRUB: Delta 4 heavy
Danno
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posted 12-09-2004 01:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Danno   Click Here to Email Danno     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SCRUB! The poor weather forecast has prompted Boeing to cancel plans to launch the Delta 4-Heavy rocket on Friday. Liftoff is rescheduled for Saturday at 2:31 p.m. EST.
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/delta/d310/status.html

Tom
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posted 12-10-2004 09:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Will the Delta-4 Heavy launch, scheduled for tomorrow afternoon air on NASA-TV?
Thanks.

Danno
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posted 12-11-2004 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Danno   Click Here to Email Danno     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another scrub today. See above link for details.

They will try again tomorrow.

dang...

Ken Havekotte
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posted 12-13-2004 02:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tom--I don't think NASA will be airing on their NASA-TV site the upcoming Delta IV Heavy maiden launch. The nation's Space Agency usually provides coverages pertaining to NASA-related missions and projects, not commercial nor/and any non-government rocket and satellite vehicle carriers like the new Delta IV Heavy.

nasamad
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posted 12-13-2004 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nasamad   Click Here to Email nasamad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Launches are broadcast here

http://www.arianespace.com/site/index2.html

Adam

Apollo-Soyuz
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posted 12-13-2004 04:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Apollo-Soyuz   Click Here to Email Apollo-Soyuz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing will have a webcast of the Delta-4 Heavy launch.

------------------
John Macco
Shady Side, MD

[This message has been edited by Apollo-Soyuz (edited December 13, 2004).]

[This message has been edited by Apollo-Soyuz (edited December 13, 2004).]

Tom
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posted 12-13-2004 10:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Ken, John. I'll have to catch it on the Boeing website.

Ben
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posted 12-14-2004 12:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Arianespace is only for ariane launches. For Delta's you can watch at:
www.boeing.com/delta

also the same at www.boeing.com/launch

For Atlas (like this Friday) and some Protons you can watch at
www.ilslaunch.com

If a NASA payload is onboard any rocket it will be on NASA TV but those are the only times.

If the payload happens to be an Echostar satellite, Dish Network customers can watch on channel 101 usually. But there have only been about 8 of those so far.

There are no official webcasts of Titans (only one left) but every launch out of Cape Canaveral can be followed here, though not always with sound or a countdown:
http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/

------------------
-Ben

http://www.geocities.com/ovcolumbia/

spaceuk
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posted 12-14-2004 05:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Really looking toward this launch as it is going set the tone for the heavy launchers for future missions.

The Delta 4 Heavy is just under 20% more powerful than the Titan-IVB .

Future potential growth Delta Heavy vehicles with maybe more strap-ons and new RS-xxx engines could also knock on the door of the capability of a Saturn V vehicle. Now that would be great :-)

Phill
UK

Tom
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posted 12-14-2004 05:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Phill:
Are you sure about the comparison between Titan 4B and Delta 4-Heavy?
I read that the new Delta has 1.9 million pounds of thrust at launch, quite a bit lower than the Titan 4B with over 3 million pounds of thrust.

[This message has been edited by Tom (edited December 14, 2004).]

Ben
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From: Daytona Beach, FL
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posted 12-14-2004 06:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ben   Click Here to Email Ben     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Boeing calls the Heavy "the most powerful launcher since the Saturn V."

Well, let's not stretch things out here.

It's true in only way...lifting capability. 1.9 million pounds of thrust can lift 29,000 lbs to geo orbit and 50,000 to low earth orbit. If they put enough of those core first stage boosters together to equal Saturn V, it's payload lofting capability would rival it.

Titna 4 can also send 50,000 to LEO, but only about 15,000 to geosync (and it has 3.4 million pounds of thrust at liftoff).

The Saturn V had 7.6 million lbs of thrust and carried about 200,000 to low earth orbit, but again that included the siv-b I believe.

The shuttle is a little different. It boasts 7.8 million at liftoff (and is by far the most powerful rocket in the world, second only to the N1 in history). But the orbiter itself is considerd "payload." The orbiter can carry 65,000 pounds maximum in its cargo bay and that has to include an upper stage if it's leaving low earth orbit.

Some NASA documents say the shuttle can lift nearly 300,000 pounds into orbit, far more than the Saturn V. Yea, well, that includes the orbiter itself!

And on a separate note, Delta 4 Heavy is the third tallest rocket ever built at 235 feet, with the N1 at 410 and Saturn V at 363.

------------------
-Ben

http://www.geocities.com/ovcolumbia/

[This message has been edited by Ben (edited December 14, 2004).]

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