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Author Topic:   ISS Expedition 43 insignia
Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 05-04-2013 10:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
ISS Expedition 43 mission patch

The International Space Station's (ISS) Expedition 43 begins with the scheduled undocking of Soyuz TMA-14M in March 2015. Three new crew members will arrive shortly thereafter on Soyuz TMA-16M.


Credit: NASA

Expedition 43 will be commanded by NASA astronaut Terry Virts. His crewmates, all flight engineers, include: Roscosmos cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov, Yury Lonchakov and Mikhail Korniyenko, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti.

The hexagon (six-sided) shape of the Expedition 43 patch represents the six crew members living and working onboard the orbital outpost.

The International Space Station is portrayed in orbit around the Earth, representing the multi-national partnership that has constructed, developed, and continues to operate the ISS for the benefit of all humankind.

The sunrise marks the beginning of a new day, reflecting the fact that we're at the dawn of our history as a space faring species. The moon and planets represent future exploration of our solar system, for which the ISS is a stepping stone.

Finally, the five stars honor the crews who have lost their lives during the pursuit of human spaceflight.

GoesTo11
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From: Denver, CO USA
Registered: Jun 2004

posted 05-04-2013 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for GoesTo11   Click Here to Email GoesTo11     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So the five stars refer to the crews of Apollo 1, Soyuz 1, Salyut 1/Soyuz 11, Challenger, and Columbia, correct? Nice gesture and a handsome patch design.

Bill Nelson
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From: Lakewood, Colorado U.S.A.
Registered: Jul 2006

posted 05-04-2013 01:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bill Nelson   Click Here to Email Bill Nelson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Somebody should ask the crew to add a star for Michael Adams, who died on an X-15 flight that I believe qualified as a space flight.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-04-2013 03:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
By international standards, only one X-15 pilot qualified for astronaut wings: Joe Walker. Adams achieved an altitude of 50.3 miles, which by USAF standards was enough to award him astronaut wings, but was 11.7 miles shy of where the rest of the world (and today, everyone) considers space begins.

dogcrew5369
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posted 05-06-2013 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Shouldn't there be an asteroid represented since that is now a destination for NASA? It would probably be silly to stick an asteroid on the patch, but why not?

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 05-06-2013 10:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The ringed planet represents a crewed spacecraft circling around an asteroid....

dogcrew5369
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posted 05-08-2013 04:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh, that makes sense. Most spherical asteroid I ever saw, but okay.

hoorenz
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From: The Netherlands
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posted 05-10-2013 05:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hoorenz   Click Here to Email hoorenz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Designed by Matt Lehman, assisted by Brandon Heath, working with Terry Virts.

Ken Havekotte
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Posts: 1947
From: Merritt Island, Florida, Brevard
Registered: Mar 2001

posted 05-10-2013 05:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
By international standards, only one X-15 pilot qualified for astronaut wings: Joe Walker.
By "international standards," have those standards changed a bit since the 1960s?

How about other X-15 rocketplane pilots such as Bob White, Pete Knight, John McKay, Bob Rushworth, and Bill Dana?

I've always thought Gen. White was the first "astronaut" so designated in a winged aircraft by flying nearly 60 miles high in July 1962, both by military (all U.S. branch services) and NASA recognition.

So, by world-wide standards today, does "space" begin at about 62 miles above the earth? Does the U.S. Air Force today not approve or support the 62-mile-high altitude?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-10-2013 07:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Due to flyover rights (the ability for a satellite or spacecraft to pass over another country without violating that nation's airspace), the U.S. military had an interest in keeping the demarcation line between Earth and space as low as possible.

And so it chose 50 miles (80.5 kilometers) to award astronaut wings.

Legally, the U.S. does not define an altitude for where space begins, but rather follows international law, which defines the lower boundary of space as the lowest perigee attainable by an orbiting space vehicle. To quote Wikipedia out of convenience:

Due to atmospheric drag, the lowest altitude at which an object in a circular orbit can complete at least one full revolution without propulsion is approximately 150 km (93 mi), while an object can maintain an elliptical orbit with perigee as low as 129 km (80 mi) with propulsion.
That said, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), the world governing body for air sports and aeronautics and astronautics world records, has held the Kármán line at 62 miles (100 kilometers) as the boundary between Earth and space since before Yuri Gagarin left the launch pad. It was by the FAI's definition that the Soviet Union and the U.S. conducted the race to launch the first satellite and then man into space.

p51
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From: Olympia, WA, USA
Registered: Sep 2011

posted 05-10-2013 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I really like this. I thought that many of the expedition patches had a very similar look, this one really stands out.

Ken Havekotte
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From: Merritt Island, Florida, Brevard
Registered: Mar 2001

posted 05-10-2013 09:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Robert, for fully explaining the 50/62-mile "space" border differences and mainly by the guidelines provided by the FAI.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-12-2013 01:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Courtesy AB Emblem, here is an early look at the embroidered Expedition 43 patch, as approved by NASA.

AB Emblem does not plan to offer this patch for sale until closer to the launch in 2015. Until then, this patch will not be in production except for the orders directly from NASA.

Liembo
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From: Bothell, WA, USA
Registered: Jan 2013

posted 09-06-2013 05:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Liembo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Too bad this one isn't in the wild yet.
Yuri Lonchakov unexpectedly resigned Thursday (Sept. 5), leaving the Russian federal space agency Roscosmos, despite being assigned to command the International Space Station in 2015.

hoorenz
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From: The Netherlands
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posted 09-14-2013 08:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hoorenz   Click Here to Email hoorenz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was told that only one single batch of 50 patches has been produced.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-14-2014 01:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Revised (Padalka) artwork, as released by NASA:

Wildcats
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From: Herington, Kansas, USA
Registered: Feb 2014

posted 02-17-2014 01:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Wildcats     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was curious why Gennadi Padalka's name on this patch doesn't match his prior patches (Expeditions 9, 20, 31, 32 and even the new 44 patch)? It appears there are too many "A's". I'm no Russian spelling expert but this 43 spelling does not look the same. Just wondering.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-17-2014 01:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Look a bit closer at the artwork. It reads:
ПАДАЛКА
The three "A's" are actually "ада" in uppercase (though the style of font has the two characters close in appearance).

Wildcats
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posted 02-17-2014 01:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Wildcats     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For some reason Robert my phone isn't displaying it like you had it spelled out. When I clicked on the picture and brought it up on the flickr site, it also appeared to be misspelled. I will have to check my computer at work tomorrow and see if it is correctly displayed. Thanks for responding and clarifying.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 02-17-2014 01:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This might help — here's an enlargement of the Padalka's name from the patch:

hoorenz
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From: The Netherlands
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posted 02-18-2014 02:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hoorenz   Click Here to Email hoorenz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was my first thought when seeing this Padalka version last November: "What an unfortunate choice for the font." In the printed version it is still somewhat acceptable, but in the embroidered patch, the A's and D are too hard to distinguish in my opinion.

If I had been asked to add Padalka's name instead of Lonchakov's, and I had encountered this unexpected problem with the font, I would have changed the "D" to the other variant, maybe something like this:

KAPTEC
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From: Madrid, Spain
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posted 02-18-2014 08:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KAPTEC   Click Here to Email KAPTEC     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It would have been a very better solution Erik, but...

hoorenz
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posted 02-18-2014 02:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hoorenz   Click Here to Email hoorenz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
...but there are more important things in life.

dogcrew5369
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posted 02-20-2014 02:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If it helps, the Russians seem to be okay with the A-looking Cyrillic D. A Russian lady gave me this bookmark once while in Russia and the D's look unusually like an A. Just saying it's not a big deal.

hoorenz
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From: The Netherlands
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posted 02-20-2014 04:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hoorenz   Click Here to Email hoorenz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No big deal indeed. Only a bit unfortunate when it is next to an A (such as Vinogradov) or even in between two A's (Padalka) and you are designing it for small embroidery...

Then this is what you get:

COR482932
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posted 02-21-2014 07:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for COR482932   Click Here to Email COR482932     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just another example of Padalka's name tag on his Sokol suit with this font style.

dogcrew5369
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posted 03-01-2014 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dogcrew5369   Click Here to Email dogcrew5369     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
True. If not for being stuck between two A's, the Cyrillic D would be no problem. Just unfortunate luck that it is.

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