Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Hardware & Flown Items
  Researching and exhibiting Voskhod Globus

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Researching and exhibiting Voskhod Globus
music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-24-2009 04:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have been working on several projects to put in context the Globus acquired at Regency-Superior.

For starters, I have gathered everything I could, from books (the Halls, Siddiqis and Harveys), the Web (a few hundred pictures, mostly from European sources), and audiovisual footage. I'm even starting to decipher the Russian language, which will undoubtedly open me up to an upper level of documentation in this subject matter.

Anyone familiar with Vostok/Voskhod hardware and procedures? Sources for documentation? I'm eager to exchange notes!

In the mean time, here's the first draft for a navigation panel mock-up presentation:

Globus FG et maquette i01 Making a Vostok-Voskhod navigation panel: tracing upon an existing photo

I started by making a composite image of the best shots I had found of the panel. I then lowered the contrast and boosted the luminosity of the picture to make it very pale, yet decipherable. After, I traced the boundary lines in black, and then tweeked the luminosity and contrast settings back such that the original image paled away, leaving only my black traces. I finally printed it to scale and stuck it to a sheet of Coroplast.

I'd like to end up making a 3-d, photorealist mock-up of the panel as one way to exhibit this beauty.

I'd like to have a killer exhibit for April 12's jubilee!

------------------
Francois Guay
Collector of litterature, notebooks, equipment and memories!

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-26-2009 03:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What a beaute!

GlobusFG Docu photo 4 002 COPIE cS pub9226+

GlobusFG Docu photo 4 013 cS pub9225+

Voskhod 'Globus' panel instrument - Close-up back view i01

GlobusFG Docu photo 4 085 cS pub9226+

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-26-2009 08:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Given the Soviets propensity for simple design and the age of the device (darn near as old as the Antikythera mechanism) would have expected a hampster attached to a drive belt which spun the globe rather then all that gearing.

Really is a thing a beauty and probably the first time opened in 50 years. It always amazes me how complex technology also is innately artistic.

------------------
Scott Schneeweis
http://www.SPACEAHOLIC.com/

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-26-2009 10:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, as I understand, it has to be slightly more complex than Mercury's, given the fact that it is motor-driven, while Mercury's is hand-wound if I recall right.

It actually seems much more complex too, but I'd like to have a picture of Liberty Bell Seven's from the Cosmpsphere which I saw in 2001... Anyone?

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-26-2009 10:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a complete compendium of pictures I took for documentation purposes.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-27-2009 12:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A few observations:

- The Soviets used metric screws and fixtures? The four screws holding the Globus to the frame of the Navigation panel are metric screws, I got replacements right off the shelf at Home Depot.

- As I expected, the instrument is mostly a mechanical work of art. All of the adjusments are mechanical, and the only electrics and electronics found are a motor (used only to fast-forward the indicator from nadir position to landing position), a variable resistance going once around each orbit, two multipole relay-type blade-contacts sending the position of cam-wheels, those being wired to a small PCB with four diodes and three resistors -- two of those being soldered in parallel. And a single solenoid actuator: it received pulses from a sequencer outside of the assembly every five seconds or so, and it turned a sprocketwheel by a fraction of a turn -- the movements cascades to the whole instrument from that single actuator. That's it! Click on the pics.

- On the first picture above, one can see some paper bullets with numbers applied on the globe at some points around the USSR -- most unrelated to a nominal landing -- which lead me to believe that this is a training unit -- albeit maybe it flew unmanned before being assigned to a training station.

kyra
Member

Posts: 520
From: Louisville CO US
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 03-01-2009 07:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Excellent! This is from a Voskhod type instrument panel. (Vostoks had an abort light in place of the latitude/longitude indicator).

The spacecraft bus voltage is 28v, but you might not want to try running this as there might be a step down transformer somewhere.

Many times in orbit, the cosmonaut was given a correction index (knob at the right side) to adjust the position.

The paper indicators are valuable info - probably communications stations (permanent and movable) for either the Zarya or Vesna system. The fact we see 2 near Ethiopia is because the TDU retrofire was over Madagascar to settle the spacecraft near the primary recovery area in Kazakhstan.

There is a checklist called "Instruction to Cosmonauts" which was updated several times during these programs, but it is not available. Amazingly it is only a small booklet.

The 24 panel lights are very enigmatic. I have tried to find these for years to no avail. We only know several of these labels through circumstantial reports. (Spusk I,II, III, Gas on Descent II, Fire, Radiation in SA, Prepare to Catapult, Tones alarm, and several others) The breakdown of colors of these lights is more consistent (10 red, 6 yellow, and 8 green, I believe)

I have a collection of panel images, some of them close up. Please contact me. May I also recommend the works of Yuri Tiapchenko - on Alexander Zhelznyakov's Encyclopedia Cosmonautica site under "Pult Cosmonauts".

Kindly, What are the outside dimensions of this panel as it faces the viewer ? This is new information. This will allow extrapolation of the sizes of other panels.

To clarify, I meant the raised portion of the front of the panel that would be seen when the panel is installed into the larger panel, sorry for the edit.

Philip
Member

Posts: 5039
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 03-08-2009 08:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
More interesting is to see the Mercury orbit indicator on the very same webpages of François Guay!!!

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 03-08-2009 06:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yeah, Phillip, these images of the Mercury piece were the first ones I put on my Photobucket repository. I had kept them from the original eBay auction page that I have missed in Spring 2002.

I had put them there to share them on a few cS threads about Globus and the Mercury OPI, such as this one.

Lou Chinal
Member

Posts: 1086
From: Staten Island, NY
Registered: Jun 2007

posted 03-12-2009 07:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would love to get my hands on a "Familiarization Manual" for a Vostok, but apparently no such book exits. The closest thing to it is "Instructions to Cosmonauts" which is only about 10 pages long(a little light reading the night before launch). And as noted early a state secret.

I'm thinking of just going around to wherever there is a Vostok on display and making a pest of myself until they let me into one, I'd photograph the living hell out of it.

kyra
Member

Posts: 520
From: Louisville CO US
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 03-13-2009 09:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kyra   Click Here to Email kyra     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Each April 12th usually brings forth new articles and previously unknown facts. Maybe we'll get lucky this year and the "Instructions to Cosmonauts" will get published by the state archives. The Vostok was actually fully declassified in 1991, but access to the information is a different problem.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-16-2009 02:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just finished building a handling and exhibition assembly for the Globus. Click the pictures to view in HD.

Photobucket

Photobucket

I designed this assembly to exhibit this instrument with its cover opened. It belongs, ideally, onto a walk-around pedestal, under a plexiglass cube.

It also serves as a bench for close-up examination. This sturdy handling assembly can safely be positioned on a tabletop on each of its six faces.

The cover is affixed to the assembly under the instrument proper. (I couldn't put the cover away because a cable bundle goes through it which couldn't be removed non-destructively). I made a special holder for the 19-prong connector.

The slight tilt backwards gives a better viewing angle on both its faceplate and its insides.

Photobucket Photobucket

I still have a few hours' work to make a crate, then it ships to this exhibition, which opens next Wednesday.

There's eighteen pictures here.

Philip
Member

Posts: 5039
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 04-16-2009 09:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well done François, what the total weight of this piece?

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-16-2009 11:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You know, I don't even know the weight of the instrument itself... But I'll find out the combined weight of the artefact-plus-assembly when I FedEx it tomorrow morning, though...

I would estimate that the piece itself must be around 8 to 10 pounds. The front-plate is thick and massive. My assembly probably adds about 5-8 pounds to it.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-17-2009 12:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I got to illuminate the indicator under the globe. What does it say exactly?

Photobucket

Mike Dixon
Member

Posts: 834
From: Kew, Victoria, Australia
Registered: May 2003

posted 04-17-2009 12:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The word "MECTO" appears to translate into the word "seat" .... second word has me stumped.

hoorenz
Member

Posts: 855
From: The Netherlands
Registered: Jan 2003

posted 04-17-2009 01:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hoorenz   Click Here to Email hoorenz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This would translate "place of landing."

spacekid2
Member

Posts: 182
From: San Diego, CA, USA
Registered: Jul 2004

posted 04-22-2009 01:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacekid2   Click Here to Email spacekid2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Or it simply means:

Location

местоположение

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 11-01-2009 11:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Voskhod "Globus" mentionned in this thread is still visible as part of the exhibition "Time & Exploration" at the National Watch & Clock Museum in Columbia, Pa, until the end of 2009.

Another notable artefact is an Apollo sextant. An Apollo 17 lunar sample is also one of the items loaned by the Smithsonian Institution.

Columbia is about one hour north of Baltimore, and about 80 minutes due west from Philadelphia.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-25-2011 12:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Philip - (almost two years ago!):
Well done François, what the total weight of this piece?
Philip, what a fool I am! I haven't weighed the item before integrating it to its home-made support, so I'll get to weigh it when I un-mount it eventually for maintenance purposes.

I would estimate the net weight to be in the neigbouring of five kilograms.

The front plate is very sturdy -- it serves as a structural support for the entire mechanism. I though originally that it was made of steel, but magnets don't stick to it, so probably aluminum. The encasing cover is also aluminum. It's 5 mm thick with even thicker protuberances.

The rest is steel and brass mounting plates and wheels of various thickness, no real effort has been made to save weight here, except for the globe itself and the two latitude and longitude cylindrical indicator, which are probably made of aluminum, the purpose of which has probably nothing to do with saving payload weight, but rather to provide reduced inertial resistance to the mechanism.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-07-2011 01:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
(Also as a Facebook event here en français ici)

Gagarin and the Globus

"Gagarin and the Globus"
Meet witnesses from the Yuri Gagarin era
at the Cosmodôme, this Sunday April 10th, 2011.

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the first human space flight by Yuri Gagarin, a spacecraft instrument from the era will be presented at Cosmodôme in Laval, Québec, during its "Gagarine Day" activities. This will be this artifact's first public presentation in Quebec, and maybe even in Canada. It exemplifies USSR's technological dedication towards its early mastery of space exploration. Other Soviet and Russian artifacts will also be shown.

The most significant item presented is a navigation instrument meant for the first manned Soviet rockets. Called "Globus", it's a miniature terrestrial globe whose displacement exhibits the movement of the spacecraft around its orbit, moved by the most exquisite horological mechanism, the size of a big toaster. The "Globus" shown on Gagarin Day is almost identical to the instrument facing the heroic cosmonaut during his historic hundred and eight minutes in space.

Visitors will be able to observe it closely and witness all of its wheels in movement, second after second: it is truly an early precursor to the GPS! This artifact and others will be presented by their collector, a fan of astronautics from Montreal. A teacher by trade, he will share with visitors of all ages the fascinating genesis of this great human adventure of the twentieth century – fifty years almost to the day after the historic space flight of April 12th, 1961.

There will be animations in both English and French, and maybe in Russian too! Indeed, the Russian community of Canada is part of "Gagarin Day" and will be celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of this momentous event from its national history.

The activity "Gagarin and the Globus" is available for institutions.

WHERE:
Cosmodôme
2150, Autoroute des Laurentides
Laval (Québec) www.cosmodome.org

WHEN:
Sunday, April 11th, 2011
from 10am to 13am

garymilgrom
Member

Posts: 1798
From: Atlanta, GA, USA
Registered: Feb 2007

posted 04-07-2011 07:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well done Francois! I wish I lived closer.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-07-2011 06:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It won't be a sorry place here next Sunday brunchtime at Cosmodome / Canadian Space Camp! The place will be crowded with: Russian community leaders, officials and nationals of all ages! La creme of the Greater Montreal astronomer hobbyists! Local families enticed by the faint media buzz! And the Cosmodôme gang or course, jolly messengers of scientific enthusiasm! I used to be one of them for a short while, one of the few docents, practically a senior citizen (at fourty ) on the "quiet" side, the museum side at this mission-galore space center!

There will be Russian food and traditions, and let's hope, some good vodka!

The Globus is now a new exhibit sitting right among Cosmodôme's own large-size Soviet and Russian replicas, right next to a eight-some-feet high Semiorka. Here is Globus exhibit, along with a Soyuz or Almaz clock:

Globus at Cosmodome / Canadian Space Camp

Truth being said, they temporarily had to remove the "V2" exhibit. The Germans will have to wait a few months...

Now, all is ready for the upcoming celebrations. "Поехали!"

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-07-2011 09:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's been agreed over an elbow-shake (I wouldn't shake hands today, runny nose, y'know...) agreed, then, that Globus will stay at Cosmodôme for some weeks or months. In fact, three more hardware items will soon join it, in a setting similar to what was used at the National Watch and Clock Museum.

The place is three miles from home, for Pete's sake! A nice bike ride it is in fact, first in Montreal ala Boston, along the banks of the quiet Prairie river, over a low-riding bridge, then Laval and its fresh industrial campuses! You'd see some rowing team at dusk you'd swear you were in Cambridge, MA. Not bad a bike ride for visiting my chargees. Seeing historical stuff serving its purpose is cool.

And I'll see Sylvain more often, I guess... Oh by the way, fellows: Isn't this a cliché for museum directors: he earnestly collects... but he's far from, let's say, savvy.

Las! he's known of my collectSPACE membership for years, but he hardly visits. Busy-busy, aren't we? But man oh man, let's buy!

Friends, he likes autographs, which I know nothing about, so I hope one of you has the little elbow push it takes to usher in this fantastic lad and to make him use it. I'd like him to know the good stuff!!!

Maybe one of those American Campers, mmhhh?

Philip
Member

Posts: 5039
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 04-11-2011 05:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congrats on probably the best "50th anniversary Vostok 1 - Yuri Gagarin" display worldwide!!!

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 04-11-2011 09:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks Philip. It went very well, hundreds came. People marvelled at the mechanical complexity of the Globus. Children read aloud instructions right from an early orientation Soyuz sextant, and everyone had a chance to touch its faceplate, "to touch history" as I invited. Just by looking at pristine packs of ASTP cigarettes, adult Russian expatriates who have stopped smoking ages ago remembered vividly the taste of those first (Philip Morris) Western cigarettes!...

I'll attend an official get-together at the Russian consulate on the 12th, the anniversary evening.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-16-2011 10:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I studied the IMP 'Globus' instrument further recently, and here are some of my findings.

Fig. 1 — Here's my unit's electrical connector.

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument

Fig. 2 — Male connector layout

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument

The 'Retro' indicator light on the Vostok and Voskhod Globus lights up when the instrument displays the projected landing point (versus the point to the nadir of the spacecraft, which is the normal operation of the instrument).

It turns out that my Globus contains only two electrical actuators:

  1. The main electrical actuator is a solenoid actuating a ratchet hook, which turns a wheel, one tooth at a time. The movement then cascades down to the rest of the mechanism: this is what actually makes the globe and the latitude-longitude indicators do their work. The electrical impulses for the solenoid probably came from a sequencer located in the instrument unit of Vostok/Voskhod. My hunch is that impulses came every 1 to 5 seconds, but I have yet to test this, and also to asses if said frequency was fixed through the flight or if it was modulated according to sensors' signal: it being modulated according to current altitude would make sense. Radar-based, precise and discrete measurement of altitude was within the 1960's state of the art. To integrate it into the mechanical computing would be taking advantage of Kepler's second law of planetary motion. As seen in Fig. 2, I have found the two pins connected to the solenoid, I have made myself a quick-and-dirty female plug from a wine cork, with nineteen tiny drilled holes and small-gauge, single-strand copper wires inserted in the proper holes. I actuate this manually from a 18v source (two 9v batteries), which works fine even though the rated voltage used for Voskhod is 28v.

  2. A second electrical actuator, to be used only before the deorbit burn, is a motor which is used to advance the instrument's position from 'Present ground position at spacecraft's nadir' to 'Ground position of expected landing if retrorockets were activated presently'. The switch for that function was found on the switch panel, the only other panel in the Vostok and Voskhod other than the navigation panel in which the Globus is found. I won't fiddle with this motor until I find out more about it. But I don't care so much for that function. Just manually going "click, click, click" on an old Morse code transmission key and 'orbiting' the Earth in slow-motion looking to this 6-inch globe... Hearing the solenoid doing its own clock, clock, which was a prevalent sound in Vostok and Voskhod, according to cosmonauts... What a thrill!
The other pins on the connector actually return data generated by the mechanical computer via electric valves (blade contacts) and voltage-modulating variable resistor. See Fig. 3. and Fig. 7.

Fig. 3 — 'A' is a variable resistor which cycles around once every mechanical 'orbit'.

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument
  • 'B' point to two coaxial, cardioid-shaped cam discs.
  • 'C' is a rocker arm tracing the inner cam disc.
  • 'E' is a rectifier bridge (I think it feeds the motor)
Fig. 4 — A central computation requirement is the transformation of rotations into sinusoids.

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument
  • 'A' is a conical cam cylinder whose cross-section defines a sinusoidal function.
  • 'B' is one of three rocker arms tracing the shape of the conical cam.
  • 'C' is connected to a front-plate knob used by the pilot to set of one of the three orbital parameters. Upon actuation of the knob, the rocker arm moves from one end of the cam to the other, hence modulating the amplitude of the function traced by the rocker arm.
  • 'D' is the tip of a second rocker arm, tracing the cam 120 degrees apart from the first rocker arm. An unseen third rocker arm traces the cam another 120 degrees further.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-16-2011 11:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fig. 5 — Each of the 'A's is an assembly of two cardioids-shaped discs, each with its own rocker arm.

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument
  • 'B's are rocker arms (two others are hidden from view).
  • 'C' transmits a resulting motion towards the latitude indicator.
Fig. 6 — There are several wheel systems like this one, which sums two motions into a single one.

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-16-2011 11:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fig. 7 — This mechanical system, with its two saw-toothed wheels and its two ratchet arms, is a mechanical rectifier: it transforms an alternative motion into a unidirectional one.

Voskhod IMP 'GLOBUS' instrument

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-16-2011 11:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fig. 8 — 'A' is the conical cam's axis and pivot point.

Voskhod IMP 'Globus' instrument

The three 'B's transmit the pilot's manual settings for each of three orbital parameters to the worm drives 'C' shown on Fig. 4.

'E' is a system of two cam discs which follows the rotation motion of the motor which, as pointed out earlier, fast-forwards the Globus' reading from actual spacecraft nadir terrain to projected point of landing, and vice-versa. 'D' is a set of blade switches whose commutation by the cam discs 'E' is transmitted to the Voskhod's switch panel, providing electrical enable-disable stops to limit the forward or backward displacement.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-20-2011 01:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Voskhod IMP 'Globus' instrument

Voskhod IMP 'Globus' instrument

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-20-2011 02:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Radio stations:

Voskhod IMP 'Globus' instrument
  1. Baykonur
  2. Kolpashevo
  3. Yelizovo
  4. Simferpol, on the Black Sea
  5. Sholkovo (Moscow)
  6. Ulan Ude
  7. Ussurisk
  8. Krasnoe Selo (Leningrad)
  9. The blank stickers are fleet ships.
So when the call "Zarya-5" is made, now we know where that is: Moscow.

Thanks to 'Kyra' for these precisions.

music_space
Member

Posts: 1075
From: Canada
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 10-28-2011 09:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for music_space   Click Here to Email music_space     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Globus now has a Wikipedia page. Feel free to comment!

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement