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  [Discuss] Omega Speedmaster space watches (Page 7)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] Omega Speedmaster space watches
Mike Dixon
Member

Posts: 844
From: Kew, Victoria, Australia
Registered: May 2003

posted 07-17-2014 05:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mike Dixon   Click Here to Email Mike Dixon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Here's Buzz modeling the new Apollo 11 45th anniversary Omega Speedmaster
I like that tie.

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 28
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 07-20-2014 08:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Couldn't help but post this one today.

Philip
Member

Posts: 5067
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 09-13-2014 04:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
New Speedmaster? Dark Side of the Moon?

MOL
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Posts: 24
From: Los Angeles, CA
Registered: Oct 2004

posted 09-13-2014 05:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MOL   Click Here to Email MOL     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not new — it has been out for about six months. Best price I have ever seen for it is $10k. It retails for $12k!!

Philip
Member

Posts: 5067
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 09-20-2014 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not about being new but about mentioning the "dark side" of the Moon... they probably mean the far side of the Moon. LOL

toadboy65
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Posts: 10
From: Alexander, Nc, USA
Registered: Sep 2014

posted 09-30-2014 07:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for toadboy65   Click Here to Email toadboy65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My wife gave me a Speedmaster for our wedding, 25 years ago. I wanted a watch that I could not kill, and I was keen on the Apollo connection as well. I have worn it high in the Himalayas and down to 250 feet underwater. I was wearing it in Mogadishu in 93, In Iraq one and two, across Southeast Asia and Africa. It is almost part of my anatomy. My spare watch is a Breitling Aerospace.

kr4mula
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Posts: 626
From: Cinci, OH
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 10-01-2014 02:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nice choices! My main watch is a Breitling Montbrillant Datora, but I'm keeping an eye out for the right vintage Speedy.

But it begs to ask...what is it that you do that takes you to all those places?

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1932
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 10-05-2014 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Dixon:
I like that tie.
They are available from The Space Shop at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

Tykeanaut
Member

Posts: 1932
From: Worcestershire, England, UK.
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 10-12-2014 08:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A quote from the book "Cold" by British explorer Ranulph Fiennes:
Watches destined for polar regions can be specially modified to withstand extremes of temperature. For example the Rolex Explorer II can upon request be equipped with a special lubricant that ensures that the watch is reliable in temperatures of minus 90 degrees C.
Did the Omega Speedmaster require any modifications such as this?

328KF
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Posts: 944
From:
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 10-12-2014 12:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Speedmaster was used to help navigate to the North Pole on the 1968 Plaisted expedition. Reinhold Messner walked to the South Pole in 1989 wearing one. In both cases, temperatures were noted to be as low as -60 deg C.

Omega uses both expeditions in their advertising, but there is no mention of them being modified with special lubricants. A few years back Omega released the "Alaska Project" model which was essentially a standard watch with a special removable outer case.

The story goes that they were developing this as a model that could withstand extended periods in extreme cold, as would be encountered on lunar pole and crater explorations.

The Chinese developed the Fiyta "Spacemaster" for their first EVA. Among their claims, is that the manufacturer "invented a specially formulated lubricant which allows the watch to continue working... temperature range of -80° to +80° Celsius (a first in the world)."

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 28
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 12-12-2014 01:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone have any insight into the relationship between NASA, the National Air and Space Museum, and the astronauts regarding the Speedmasters used on their individual missions? Was there a specific reason why the National Air and Space Museum chooses to keep possession/ownership of the watches and not allow them to be kept by the astronauts? I did have a conversation with the curator of personal equipment once and she said that the astronauts had a great personal connection to the watches they flew with.

I do know they are sometimes given out on loan to the astronauts for events, but what makes them different than other items they were allowed to keep possession of?

The reason I ask, is I was watching an old Apollo 8 lecture (2008) put on by the NASM and a question was asked about possession of items kept by the museum. The curator began to answer and Bill Anders spoke out and said "Like watches?" In response, both Borman and Lovell began to laugh. It sounded like the issue of the watches was a touchy subject. Borman's reaction was like "Oh no, here we go."

Again, just looking for a little bit more insight if more could be shared here.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 31202
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-12-2014 07:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA, rather than the Smithsonian, made the decision to retain the Speedmasters as federal property.

Late in the Apollo program, memos were exchanged between the Johnson Space Center and NASA Headquarters to establish what the space agency would retain for reuse or display and what it would release to the astronauts. The watches were grouped with other non-expendable equipment to be kept.

NASA later transferred ownership of the watches as a group to the Smithsonian, under its agreement with the institution concerning the preservation of space program artifacts. For many years after that though, the Smithsonian loaned the astronauts their Speedmasters for their personal use.

The Apollo 8 crew's comments may have come near the time the Smithsonian was recalling the loan of all the watches to enter the national collection.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 31202
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-15-2014 08:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
On the watch blogs, some attendees at Baselworld have posted pics of the new iteration of the Speedmaster X-33, called the "Skywalker."
Omega on Dec. 11 formally announced the Speedmaster Skywalker X-33.
Omega's new Skywalker X-33 space watch features astronaut's invention

A European astronaut's idea for improving the wristwatches worn in space has become the basis for a new version of the timepiece first used on the moon.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 31202
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 12-15-2014 08:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Omega has also announced the Speedmaster "Gray Side of the Moon," a watch "inspired by the lunar dust that has preserved mankind's first and last steps on the moon."
This 44.25 mm shimmering model is crafted from white ceramic that has been transformed through-and-through to a metallic grey. This addition to the iconic Speedmaster collection tells another story of the Apollo 8 mission and captures NASA astronaut Jim Lovell's words during the spacecraft’s lunar orbit: "The Moon is essentially grey."

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 28
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 12-16-2014 06:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just received notification that my new Skywalker just arrived at the boutique in Florence. I think this is a great update to the original X-33 and the GEN II version.


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