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  [Discuss] Omega Speedmaster space watches (Page 5)

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] Omega Speedmaster space watches
Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-22-2010 11:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kirk Jenks:
Very cool!! What does it cost?
As with all high-end watches, it's best to call an Omega authorized dealer and inquire, but some online reports place it in the vicinity of $7,500.

Ashy
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posted 07-02-2011 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know this is a late entry for the ASTP Speedmaster but I have just managed to get my hands on one a couple of days ago. When it originally came out last year I liked it, then didn't like it then liked it again. By the time I decided to raid my savings and get it they all seemed to have been snapped up.

Well I was out shopping the other day in Manchester and found one! My wife convinced me I should get it, as I had been searching for one for so long, so with very little arm twisting I got it. It is a beautiful watch, (and in my opinion, nicer than the 40th anniversary Apollo 15 watch that my wife was going to get me for my birthday). The watch is great and so is my wife!!

moorouge
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posted 07-15-2011 01:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
The serial numbers on the lugs did not appear until the mid-90's.
I have a Speedmaster with a number on the lug - 011 - bought in the very early 90's.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-26-2011 09:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Omega has introduced the Speedmaster Moonwatch "Apollo 15" 40th Anniversary Limited Edition.
There are also some features which distinguish the Apollo 15 40th Anniversary model from the classic Speedmaster Professional. This Limited Edition timepiece has a minute track in blue, white and red – the three colors of the Apollo 15 patch. There is a blue ring around the small seconds subdial; there are white and red rings around the 12-hour and 30-minute counters respectively.

The screw-in caseback is embossed with an image of the Lunar Rover and the words "APOLLO 15" and "40th ANNIVERSARY". The outer circle of the caseback is black chrome engraved with "THE FIRST WATCH WORN ON THE MOON", "JULY 30, 1971" and the limited edition number.

Philip
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posted 07-26-2011 11:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The backside looks superb on this one

nasamad
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posted 07-26-2011 03:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nasamad   Click Here to Email nasamad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I love the face on the one, nice and subtle.

Lou Chinal
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posted 07-26-2011 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not a big fan of anniversary models, but I think I'm going to get this one.

spaceflight america
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posted 08-11-2011 07:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflight america     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am working with a non-profit, and we have been trying to get some dummy Speedmaster watches for display on our shuttle and Apollo spacesuits.

Our NASA contact at Johnson suggest we just send them an email, explain our situation, and mention his name. I did, and got a nice form email telling me that they were looking into it. Months later, no response.

I know they make them, and I suspect dummy watches are not too expensive. Any advice? Anybody know the President of Speedmaster (Swatch)?

Tykeanaut
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posted 08-11-2011 09:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would just send them a gentle reminder asking for a decision.

The President of Omega watches in 2009 was Mr. Stephen Urquhart. I imagine he still is?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-11-2011 09:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Having worked with OMEGA (they sponsored collectSPACE for a year several years ago), my advice is to be patient but also realistic.

OMEGA fields a lot of requests and they are selective about who they work with or where they allow their watches to be displayed. If you didn't stipulate in your original letter, you may want to follow-up with specific exhibit plans, including how many people you estimate will see the displays and in what context they will do so (i.e. educational field trips, museum visits, etc.).

As an alternative, you may want to work with a local authorized OMEGA dealer who might loan (or donate) watches as an in-kind sponsorship of your exhibit.

spaceflight america
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posted 08-11-2011 09:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaceflight america     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good advice. I will follow up with a more detailed letter, and if that doesn't work, I will check with my local dealer.

David Carey
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posted 08-11-2011 09:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David Carey   Click Here to Email David Carey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One other thought. The USA Omega service center may have some Speedys that are beyond repair but otherwise cosmetically suitable for your needs.

I believe this is the right/central service spot.

SilverSnoopy
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posted 08-22-2011 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SilverSnoopy   Click Here to Email SilverSnoopy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nasamad:
I was wondering if anyone knows where I can get an "Apollo style" velcro strap? Obviously I don't need one as long as the Apollo straps, but I know Omega did issue some kind of commemorative watch with an optional velcro strap.
eBay has them now in both sizes. Buzz is wearing one with the strap wrapped around his wrist 2x in his Apollo 11 on-board photo.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-28-2011 10:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For Omega owners in the Houston area, good news:
OMEGA comes to Houston as the brand's new flagship store opens at the Houston Galleria

The 2635-square-foot OMEGA Boutique will offer the brand’s entire product palette, including products which are only available at OMEGA flagship stores.

The concept for the OMEGA Boutique at the Houston Galleria was modeled on the design of the New York flagship. The façade has been conceived around the themes of sun, water, earth and time. Brilliant lighting illuminating the products in the show window represents the sun’s energetic light rays.

A stroke pattern above the displays casts shadows and reflects light – a perfect depiction of clouds, which gather water and generate rain. Vertical tracks express rainfall. The rain symbolizes time which is never still and never returns in exactly the same form.

Below the displays, chiseled and silvered glass represents an exposed cross section of the earth, which conveys a history of time.

Buzz Aldrin attended the ribbon cutting on Sept. 21 (link includes photos).

328KF
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posted 09-28-2011 02:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While these new Omega boutiques are great to visit, I would disagree that they are good news. Swatch has been trying to move their Omega brand upscale the past few years, to compete with the likes of Rolex.

I recently visited the one in White Plains, NY and found it pretty spectacular, but so were the prices! The anniversary editions are priced significantly higher than the standard model (Apollo 15 was $7500, I recall) and NO discounts are ever considered.

The sales staff is very knowledgable and friendly, and acknowledge that this is the new direction for the company. They have cut a vast majority of their authorized dealers in the U.S., where the discounts could be significant, in order to sell on their own turf.

The boutique will be a nice place to visit, drool over nice watches, and pick up a free copy of Omega's Lifetime magazine. Other than that, not a good thing for the prospective buyer.

328KF
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posted 03-07-2012 03:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just announced by Omega — Omega Spacemaster Z-33 — the apparent successor to the Speedmaster and the current issue X-33. I wonder if we'll see these on ISS in the future...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-08-2012 08:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
OMEGA's press materials make no mention of the Spacemaster Z-33 being designed or intended for use in space.

Despite its name, it seems to be a successor to the FlightMaster, rather than the Speedmaster (or X-33).

Time will tell (no pun intended) but I would have expected OMEGA to promote its history in space were this watch intended to continue that legacy.

328KF
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posted 03-08-2012 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes it's an odd move for Omega... a quartz movement re-make of an old pilot watch design in a time when in-house developed mechanical calibers are all the rage.

I really don't understand why they would play off of the X-33 and Speedmaster names with this one. It is a bit misleading if they don't intend to market them to NASA.

Personally I don't like the case design, but the one positive I see in this is that Omega has not completely ruled out producing quartz movements. If they would open their eyes and realize that there is a growing desire for the X-33 to become available again, maybe a re-release is possible. Funny how once a product like that is discontinued, everybody wants one.

garymilgrom
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posted 03-08-2012 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The red LED-like readouts, even if they are some high-tech LCD technology, echo the cheapest watches made. I think the design is very poor.

Tykeanaut
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posted 03-08-2012 10:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yuck! I'll stick with the Speedmaster, thank you.

Gilbert
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posted 03-08-2012 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Gilbert   Click Here to Email Gilbert     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yeah, I agree, it's not all that attractive.

Glint
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posted 03-08-2012 01:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The tiny face in the awkwardly large case is offsetting. I agree, it's quite an eye sore -- especially with the unsightly red LED numerals.

328KF
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posted 03-08-2012 03:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And as if to make up for striking out with that one, Omega has hit a home run with the "First Omega in Space" edition of the Speedmaster, closely replicating Wally Schirra's model he wore on MA-8.

True Speedy fans will note the subtle differences between this and the modern issued watches, particularly the straight case lugs and no crown guard on the side buttons.

Really pleased with this one!

Ashy
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posted 03-14-2012 10:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've just been sent a rather blurred image from a display at Baselworld 2012 of the Apollo 17 anniversary watch.

I don't know whether I like it or not. It seems a departure from the usual anniversary Omegas, with the face being what appears to be an engraved Apollo 17 patch in a silver or pewter colour.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-14-2012 10:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Omega hasn't put out a release yet but here are some photos via Flickr:

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo XVII will be available beginning in November for a suggested retail price of $7,200.

The previously announced Speedmaster "First Omega in Space" will go on sale in September for a suggested retail price of $5,300.

The Spacemaster Z-33 will be available in May for a suggested $5,900.

Ashy
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posted 03-14-2012 11:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's the chappie! A lot better than the photo I have been sent!

What do people think? I have the option of putting an order in but I think it needs to grow on me.

Tykeanaut
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posted 03-14-2012 12:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tykeanaut   Click Here to Email Tykeanaut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry, I don't like the Apollo 17 issue either. The crew patch would have been fine on the reverse or smaller like the Apollo 11 40th anniversary edition.

garymilgrom
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posted 03-14-2012 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think it's beautiful. If I had the funds, Apollo would be telling me the time.

Neil Aldrin
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posted 05-15-2012 09:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Neil Aldrin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just purchased a pre-owned Moon to Mars Speedmaster and wanted to verify the authenticity of the movement, so I removed the back (yes, it's real).

What I noticed in putting the watch-back back on is that the words and logo do not line up perfectly like they do in those nice Omega photos. So I did much searching on the internet to find different photos of Speedy watch-backs. What I found is that most don't line up perfectly at all. Matter of fact, they seem to be in all different orientations when they are installed and tightened.

Has this been your experience as well?

Larry McGlynn
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posted 05-15-2012 06:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo XVII will be available beginning in November
I was not planning to purchase another Speedmaster, but this one is beautiful in it's design.

I placed my order via a deposit for the Apollo 17 watch last week. The edition number is 72. I should have it by the Apollo 17 40th anniversary in December.

It looks exquisite due to the change in watch face style. Omega is making some daring changes with anniversary watches. The ASTP 35th Anniversary watch with a meteorite face (Gibeon meteorite) was a unique and welcome departure from the former design.

LM-12
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posted 01-15-2013 10:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Charlie Duke mentions in the crew debrief that his watch was damaged on EVA-3:

DUKE: Another comment on the EVA. We mentioned our failures, except one I failed to mention was that my watch blew a crystal on EVA-3 and it stopped running at that point. So the flight watch went belly up and I got it brought it back to let them examine it. But the crystal either blew out or broke, and I don't ever remember hitting it. The face of the watch doesn't look like it's scratched. So I think what happened is the crystal just blew out and we got dust in it, and the thing was just not running and that happened on EVA-3. That's it.

LM-12
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posted 01-16-2013 12:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA photo AS16-116-18719 is a close-up shot of Charlie Duke taken near the end of EVA-3. It looks to me like the watch on his right arm is missing the crystal cover and there is some lunar dust on the watch face.

Rick Mulheirn
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posted 01-16-2013 04:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick Mulheirn   Click Here to Email Rick Mulheirn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Judging by this photo Charlie's watch was repaired upon return from the moon.

Jurg Bolli
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posted 01-16-2013 08:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jurg Bolli   Click Here to Email Jurg Bolli     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Where was this photo taken, where is the watch now?

LM-12
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posted 01-16-2013 09:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think the unrepaired watch would have made a more interesting display. Now it just looks like all the others.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-16-2013 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It may have been repaired because Duke desired to continue wearing it on Earth. The Smithsonian provided the watches on loan to the astronauts for their continued use.

GACspaceguy
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posted 01-16-2013 10:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for GACspaceguy   Click Here to Email GACspaceguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So, would it have been Omega or NASA that cleaned and thus captured the moon dust, I wonder?

328KF
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posted 01-16-2013 09:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There were, in fact, two occasions when the venerable Speedmaster popped a crystal during lunar surface EVA's. Charlie's watch did so on EVA 3, and Dave Scott's was reported to have failed on EVA 2.

As the days on the surface passed , the temperatures rose, so each successive EVA was performed at a higher ambient temperature. I believe during testing, there was one temperature range (a large fluctuation between cold shadow and extremely hot sunlight) which was identified that caused enough flexing of the Hesalite crystal that it could separate from the bezel.

Scott identified this failure as the reason he used his backup Waltham chronograph during EVA 3. I seem to recall during TV transmissions on the return flight of 16 that Duke still had a Speedmaster on his wrist, although the resolution is not good enough to determine if it is the failed one or a spare.

Following Apollo, Omega designed and evaluated an additional outer case that was intended to protect the watch during proposed lunar pole expeditions in extreme cold. These models were known as the "Alaska Project" and were re-released to the public several years ago. They had a white face and the aluminum case that the watch rested in was red. While good as a conversation piece, they were, in my opinion not a very attractive pieces to wear in normal daily use.

Lou Chinal
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posted 01-17-2013 04:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lou Chinal   Click Here to Email Lou Chinal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'll admit the Apollo 17 version looks cool, I think I'll get the MA-8 style.

LM-12
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posted 01-19-2013 01:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The anomaly summary in the Apollo 16 Mission Report has this about Duke's watch failure:

At depressurization, just prior to the third lunar extravehicular activity, the Lunar Module Pilot noted that his chronograph crystal was gone. The chronograph hands and face were not hit. However, about 12 minutes later the movement stopped. Most likely, warpage caused by thermal cycling allowed the differential pressure across the acrylic crystal to pop it out of the case. The exposure to and penetration of lunar dust contamination about the Lunar Module Pilot's sleeves probably caused the failure of the chronograph movement.

These chronographs are certified to a maximun temperature of 160° F. Testing has demonstrated that in the range of 190° F, the crystal is weakened to the point where internal pressure can push the crystal off. For the chronograph to reach a temperature of 190° F, direct continuous exposure to incident solar radiation normal to its surface is required for approximately 12 minutes.

These chronographs are tested at the Manned Spacecraft Center when received, again before shipment to the Kennedy Space Center and again just prior to flight. The Apollo chronograph is a secondary timing device and is not critical to mission success or crew safety. There are no plans for corrective action.

This anomaly is closed.


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